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INTEGRIERTER RESONATOR UND FILTERVORRICHTUNG - Dokument EP0894190
 
PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP0894190 24.01.2002
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0894190
Titel INTEGRIERTER RESONATOR UND FILTERVORRICHTUNG
Anmelder Donaldson Co., Inc., Minneapolis, Minn., US
Erfinder GILLINGHAM, R., Gary, Prior Lake, US;
RISCH, T., Daniel, Burnsville, US;
TOKAR, C., Joseph, Apple Valley, US;
WAGNER, M., Wayne, Apple Valley, US;
MATTHYS, A., Bernard, Apple Valley, US;
STEINBRUECK, A., Edward, Eden Prairie, US
Vertreter Eisenführ, Speiser & Partner, 28195 Bremen
DE-Aktenzeichen 69709082
Vertragsstaaten AT, BE, CH, DE, DK, ES, FI, FR, GB, GR, IE, IT, LI, LU, MC, NL, PT, SE
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 25.04.1997
EP-Aktenzeichen 979213915
WO-Anmeldetag 25.04.1997
PCT-Aktenzeichen US9707003
WO-Veröffentlichungsnummer 9741345
WO-Veröffentlichungsdatum 06.11.1997
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 03.02.1999
EP date of grant 12.12.2001
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 24.01.2002
IPC-Hauptklasse F02M 35/14

Beschreibung[en]
Background of the Invention 1. Field of the Invention

The present invention is directed to an integrated filter and resonator apparatus for filtering the air and reducing the noise, and in particular to an apparatus which inserts inline into a duct.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Systems for filtering air and systems for reducing noise with engines such as internal combustion engines are well known. Internal combustion engines typically have ducts to direct air into the engine which usually include an intake snorkel. an air cleaner, an intake duct, and an intake manifold. In addition, a throttling mechanism or throttle body is found on spark ignited internal combustion engines.

The air cleaner component has evolved from filters with oil applied to the filter media for trapping particulate to pleated filters in annular configurations positioned on top of the engine. Filters in present automobiles typically utilized are panel-type filters configured to fit into crowded spaces of smaller engine compartments. However, it can be appreciated that more efficient and smaller filters are needed with current and future vehicle designs which can be placed inline into a duct.

Helmholtz resonator devices require a large volume forming a resonator chamber and a connection type to the source of the noise However. the large volume required takes up valuable space in the engine compartment which is at a premium in today's automobile designs. In addition, since the resonator chamber typically requires a large volume, it may be placed distant from the noise source, thereby requiring duct work leading to the chamber taking up additional volume.

Since filters and resonators typically each require an enlarged chamber for satisfactory performance, it can be appreciated that the enlarged volume could be combined to decrease the overall volume required for separate filter and resonator devices. In addition to the volume required for two separate devices. the additional volume is required for duct work for two devices rather than a single, combined device.

Integrated resonator filter apparatuses are known from FR 1.586.317, DE 26.16.861 A and FR 1.207.490. All of these resonator filter apparatuses disclose a cylindrical filter element having an open filter interior. The air flow is directed from the outside of the filter element into the open filter interior towards the resonator. Accordingly, prior art resonator filter apparatuses require housings having larger diameters than the respective filterelements and do not provide inline straight-through flow. Furthermore, the housing comprise air inlets being perpendicular to the respective air outlets and for example can not be space-savingly inserted directly into a duct.

It can be seen then, that a new and improved resonator and filtering device is needed which occupies less volume than traditional devices. Such a device should provide for using a single volume for housing both the resonator and the filter device. In addition, the filter apparatus should provide for substantially inline straight-through flow which can lead into a resonator device. The apparatus should also be insertable directly inline into a duct or other chamber while occupying less volume. The present invention addresses these as well as others associated with filter and resonator devices.

Summary of the Invention

The present invention is directed to an integrated resonator filter apparatus for filtering fluid and reducing noise. The apparatus includes a fluted filter element in a preferred embodiment. Downstream from the filter element is a resonator device integrated into the same housing. A Helmhol resonator having an enclosure with a straight tube of such dimensions that the enclosure resonates at a single frequency determined by the geometry of the resonator is used in several embodiments. The resonator device is generally directly coupled to a duct leading to an engine plenum or other noise source. The resonator and filter are in an integrally-formed device sharing a housing in a preferred embodiment which is insertable inline into a duct, serving as a portion of the duct.

These features of novelty and various other advantages which characterize the invention are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed hereto and forming a part hereof. However, for a better understanding of the invention, its advantages, and the objects obtained by its use, reference should be made to the drawings which form a further part hereof, and to the accompanying descriptive matter, in which there is illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the invention.

Brief Description of the Drawings

In the drawings, wherein like reference letters and numerals indicate corresponding elements throughout the several views:

  • Figure 1 shows a perspective view of double-faced fluted filter media for the filter apparatus according to the principles of the present invention;
  • Figure 2A-2B show diagrammatic views of the process of manufacturing the filter media shown in Figure 1;
  • Figure 3 shows a perspective view of the fluted filter media layered in a block configuration according to the principles of the present invention;
  • Figure 4 shows a detail perspective view of a layer of single-faced filter media for the filter element shown in Figure 3;
  • Figure 5 shows a perspective view of the fluted filter media spiraled in a cylindrical configuration according to the principles of the present invention;
  • Figure 6 shows a detail perspective view of a portion of the spiraled fluted filter media for the filter element shown in Figure 5;
  • Figure 7 shows an end view of a first embodiment of a resonator and filter apparatus according to the principles of the present invention;
  • Figure 8 shows a top plan view partially broken away of the resonator and filter apparatus shown in Figure 7;
  • Figure 9 shows a side sectional view of the resonator and filter apparatus taken along line 9-9 of Figure 8;
  • Figure 10 shows a side elevational view partially broken away of a second embodiment of a resonator and filter apparatus;
  • Figure 11 shows a top plan view partially broken away of the resonator and filter apparatus shown in Figure 10;
  • Figure 12 shows an end elevational view of a third embodiment of a resonator and filter apparatus according to the principles of the present invention;
  • Figure 13 shows a side sectional view taken along line 13-13 of Figure 12;
  • Figure 14 shows an end elevational view of a fourth embodiment of a resonator and filter apparatus according to the principles of the present invention;
  • Figure 15 shows a sectional view of the resonator and filter apparatus taken along line 15-15 of Figure 14;
  • Figure 16 shows a sectional view taken through line 16-16 of the resonator of the resonator and filter apparatus shown in Figure 15;
  • Figure 17 shows an end elevational view of a fifth embodiment of a resonator and filter apparatus according to the principles of the present invention;
  • Figure 18 shows a side sectional view of the resonator and filter apparatus taken along line 18-18 of Figure 17;
  • Figure 19 shows a perspective view of a modular filter /resonator attached to an intake manifold of a typical internal combustion engine;
  • Figure 20 shows a perspective view of an integrated filter and resonator apparatus integrated into the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine;
  • Figure 21 shows a perspective view of an integral resonator and filter apparatus having the resonator volume integrated into the intake manifold downstream from the filter element; and
  • Figure 22 shows a graph of noise attenuation versus frequency for the resonator apparatus shown in Figure 14.

Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiment

Referring now to the drawings, and in particular to Figure 1, there is shown a portion of a layer of double-faced permeable fluted filter media, generally designated 22. The fluted filter media 22 includes a multiplicity of flutes 24 which form a modified corrugated-type material. The flute chambers 24 are formed by a center fluting sheet 30 forming alternating peaks 26 and troughs 28 mounting between facing sheets 32, including a first facing sheet 32A and a second facing sheet 32B. The troughs 28 and peaks 26 divide the flutes into an upper row and lower row. In the configuration shown in Figure 1, the upper flutes form flute chambers 36 closed at the downstream end, while upstream closed end flutes 34 are the lower row of flute chambers. The fluted chambers 34 are closed by first end bead 38 filling a portion of the upstream end of the flute between the fluting sheet 30 and the second facing sheet 32B. Similarly, a second end bead 40 closes the downstream end of alternating flutes 36. Adhesive tacks 42 connect the peaks 26 and troughs 28 of the flutes 24 to the facing sheets 32A and 32B. The flutes 24 and end beads 38 and 40 provide a filter element which is structurally self-supporting without a housing.

When filtering, unfiltered fluid enters the flute chambers 36 which have their upstream ends open, as indicated by the shaded arrows. Upon entering the flute chambers 36, the unfiltered fluid flow is closed off by the second end bead 40. Therefore, the fluid is forced to proceed through the fluting sheet 30 or facing sheets 32. As the unfiltered fluid passes through the fluting sheet 30 or face sheets 32, the fluid is filtered through the filter media layers, as indicated by the unshaded arrows. The fluid is then free to pass through the flute chambers 34, which have their upstream end closed and to flow out the downstream end out the filter media 22. With the configuration shown, the unfiltered fluid can filter through the fluted sheet 30, the upper facing sheet 32A or lower facing sheet 32B, and into a flute chamber 34 open on its downstream side.

Referring now to Figures 2A-2B, the manufacturing process for fluted filter media which may be stacked or rolled to form filter elements, as explained hereinafter, is shown. It can be appreciated that when the filter media is layered or spiraled, with adjacent layers contacting one another, only one facing sheet 32 is required as it can serve as the top for one fluted layer and the bottom sheet for another fluted layer. Therefore, it can be appreciated that the fluted sheet 30 need be applied to only one facing sheet 32.

As shown in Figure 2A, a first filtering media sheet 30 is delivered from a series of rollers to opposed crimping rollers 44 forming a nip. The rollers 44 have intermeshing wavy surfaces to crimp the first sheet 30 as it is pinched between the rollers 44 and 45. As shown in Figure 2B, the first now corrugated sheet 30, and a second flat sheet of filter media 32 are fed together to a second nip formed between the first of the crimping rollers 44 and an opposed roller 45. A sealant applicator 47 applies a sealant 46 along the upper surface of the second sheet 32 prior to engagement between the crimping roller 44 and the opposed roller 45. At the beginning of a manufacturing run, as the first sheet 30 and second sheet 32 pass through the rollers 44 and 45, the sheets fall away. However as sealant 46 is applied, the sealant 46 forms first end bead 38 between the fluted sheet 30 and the facing sheet 32. The troughs 28 have tacking beads 42 applied at spaced intervals along their apex or are otherwise attached to the facing sheet 32 to form flute chambers 34. The resultant structure of the facing sheet 32 sealed at one edge to the fluted sheet 30 is single-faced layerable filter media 48, shown in Figure 4.

Referring now to Figure 3, it can be appreciated that the single-faced filter media layer 48 having a single backing sheet 32 and a single end bead 38 can be layered to form a block-type filter element, generally designated 50. A second bead 40 is laid down on an opposite edge outside of the flutes so that adjacent layers 48 can be added to the block 50. In this manner, first end beads 38 are laid down between the top of the facing sheet and the bottom of the uted sheet 30, as shown in Figure 4, while the space between the top of the fluting sheet 30 and the bottom of the facing sheet 32 receives a second bead 40. In addition, the peaks 26 are tacked to the bottom of the facing sheet 32 to form flutes 36. In this manner, a block of fluted filter media 50 is achieved utilizing the fluted layers 48 shown in Figure 4. The filter element 50 includes adjacent flutes having alternating first closed ends and second closed ends to provide for substantially straight-through flow of the fluid between the upstream flow and the downstream flow.

Turning now to Figures 5 and 6, it be appreciated that the single-faced filter media 48 shown in Figure 4 can be spiraled to form a cylindrical filtering element 52. The cylindrical filter element 52 is wound about a center mandrel 54 or other element to provide a mounting member for winding, which may be removable or left to plug the center. It can be appreciated that non-round center winding members may be utilized for making other filtering element shapes, such as filter elements having an oblong or oval profile. As a first 38, as shown in Figure 4, has already been laid down on the filter media layer 48, it is necessary to lay down a second bead 40 with the sealing device 47, shown in Figure 5, at a second end on top of the fluted layer 30. Therefore, the facing sheet 32 acts as both an inner facing sheet and exterior facing sheet, as shown in detail in Figure 6. In this manner, a single facing sheet 32 wound in layers is all that is needed for forming a cylindrical fluted filtering element 52. It can be appreciated that the outside periphery of the filter element 52 must be closed to prevent the spiral from unwinding and to provide an element sealable against a housing or duct. Although in the embodiment shown, the single faced filter media layers 48 are wound with the flat sheet 32 on the outside, there may be applications wherein the flat sheet 32 is wound on the inside of the corrugated sheet 30.

Referring now to Figures 7-9, there is shown a first embodiment of an integrated filter and Helmholtz resonator apparatus, generally designated 60. The filter and noise control apparatus 60 includes filter elements 62 arranged as parallel fluid flow paths. In the preferred embodiment, the filter elements 62 are spiraled, fluted filter elements, as shown in Figures 5 and 6. enters the elements 62 at an enlarged inlet 64 and exits at a reduced outlet 66. A housing 68 retains the elements in a side-by-side arrangement and a coaxial Helmholtz resonator tube 70 mounts intermediate and offset from the filter elements 62 and substantially aligned with the outlet 66. Gaskets 72 and 74 retain the filter elements in a sealed configuration which forces the fluid through the elements and prevents contaminants from bypassing the filter elements 62. Although the integral filter and resonator apparatus 60 is shown alone, it can be appreciated that additional ducting may be connected to the inlet 64 to draw fluid from remote locations.

In addition to the coaxial resonator tube 70, the volume surrounding the filter element 62 creates a Helmholtz resonator volume that can be tuned to control the induction noise created by the engine's operation. The configuration of the coaxial resonator tube 70 is on the outlet side of the filter element 62 to control noise passed directly from an engine downstream. The coaxial design improves the coupling path of the Helmholtz resonator to the engine noise which propagates directly through the plenum to the downstream side of the filter element 62.

Referring now to Figures 10-11, there is shown a second embodiment of the integrated filter/Helmholtz resonator apparatus, generally designed 80. The resonator and filter apparatus 80 includes a housing 82 with a filter element 84, a Helmholtz resonator volume 81, and a coaxial Helmholtz resonator tube 86. In the embodiment shown in Figures 10-11, the filter element 84 is a substantially rectangular block type filter utilizing the fluted filter media 50, as shown in Figure 3. Fluid enters the housing 82 at an inlet 88 and exits at an outlet 90. The outlet 90 couples directly to the engine induction plenum in a preferred embodiment. Although the filter element 84 shown has a square cross-section profile, it can be appreciated that this profile can be formed in a suitable common shape to optimize the filter loading area and utilize the space available.

The area downstream from the filter element 84 includes a narrowing chamber 92 surrounding the coaxial Helmholtz resonator tube 86. The coaxial resonator tube extends substantially with the prevailing direction of flow and bends upward at its upstream end to engage an orifice in the wall of the narrowing chamber 92. It can be appreciated that the volume between the housing 82 and chamber 92 form the Helmholtz resonator volume 81.

Referring now to Figures 12 and 13, there is shown a third embodiment of an integral filter and Helmholtz resonator apparatus, generally designed 100. The resonator and filter 100 includes a tandem Helmholtz resonator 102 and a filter portion 104 upstream of the resonator portion 102. A housing 106 includes an inlet 108 proximate the filter 104 and an outlet 110 downstream from the resonator portion 102. The Helmholtz resonator 102 includes a volume 112 and a coaxial tube 114 substantially coaxial with the outlet 110 and including an upstream end portion 116 bending to extend radially to connect to an orifice in the wall of a resonating volume chamber 118. The filter 104 may include a radial gasket 120 forming a seal around the periphery of the filter 104 with the housing 106. The seal 120 is integrally formed to the body of filter element 104 in a preferred embodiment. In the preferred embodiment, the filter 104 is a fluted filter element, as shown in Figures 5 and 6. The outlet 110 is preferably directly linked to an engine intake plenum when used with internal combustion engines.

It can be appreciated that with the embodiment shown in Figures 12 and 13, the tandem Helmholtz resonator filter apparatus 100 can be coupled with an intake duct or snorkel to require very little additional volume from an engine compartment. In this manner, the engine may have an intake located outside the engine compartment while the tandem resonator and filter apparatus 100 is located within the engine compartment.

Referring now to Figures 14-16, there is shown a fourth embodiment of a integral filter and Helmholtz resonator apparatus, generally designed 120. As with the embodiment shown in Figures 12 and 13, the resonator and filter apparatus 120 includes a Helmholtz resonator 122 and filter portion 124. A housing 126 includes an inlet 128 and an outlet 130. The filter may include a gasket 132 which forms a seal between the housing 126 and the periphery of a filter element 134. The gasket 132 provides for removing the upstream end of the housing 126 and replacing the filter element 134.

The Helmholtz resonator 122 includes an annular tube 136 which extends from the outlet 130 upstream into the resonator portion 122. In addition, a coaxial tube 138 extends downstream into the annular tube 136. The annular tube 136 opens at its upstream end between a widening area 140 of the coaxial tube 138 and the Helmholtz resonator volume 142. In addition, the coaxial tube 138 opens at the downstream end to the annular tube 136. Therefore, an open annular passage is formed between the outlet 130 at the downstream end and the Helmholtz resonator volume 142 at the upstream end. By sizing the coupling areas, the Helmholtz tube created by tubes 136 and 138, and the resonator 142 to match the wave lengths of the given noise frequencies, the noise can be greatly reduced with the present invention. In addition, the previous advantages from the other embodiments relating to positioning of the intake and volume required are retained. As shown in Figure 16, the coaxial tube may include flattened side portions 144 which further reduce the size of the passage between the coaxial tube 136 and the annular tube 138. In this manner, two opposing top and bottom chambers, as shown in Figure 16, are created for the Helmholtz connecting tube to the resonator volume 142. This provides for additional sound reduction tuning and for greater precision in matching the targeted noise wavelengths.

Referring now to Figures 17 and 18, there is shown a fifth embodiment of an integral Helmholtz resonator-filter apparatus, generally designed 150. The integral resonator filter apparatus 150 includes a Helmholtz resonator 152 and a filter portion 154. A housing 156 includes an inlet 158 and outlet 160.

In the preferred embodiment, a filter element 162 is a cylindrical fluted filter type element, as shown in Figures 5 and 6. The fluted filter element 162 preferably includes a gasket 164 intermediate the filter element 160 and the housing 156. As with the other embodiments, a Helmholtz resonator 152 is downstream from the filter element 162. The Helmholtz resonator 152 includes a communication tube 166 extending to a volume 168 upstream from the communication tube 166. The communication tube extends into the outlet 160. A second resonating structure includes coupled chambers having a communication chamber 170 at the outlet 160 which has the communication tube 166 extending partially thereinto. In addition, the communication chamber 170 extends downstream beyond the communication tube 166 receiving flow from the outlet 160. Within the housing 156 is a resonating chamber 172 surrounding the enlarged portion of the Helmholtz volume 168. The various resonator structures provide for noise reduction over a wide frequency range. The various elements may be configured so that particular frequencies over the wide range may be precisely tuned.

Referring now to Figures 19-21, there are shown embodiments of a filter apparatus mounted in an intake manifold. shown in Figure 19, an integral filter/ resonator apparatus 200 includes a resonator section 202 with a filter section 204 which may be separate modular components which seat together to form the integral resonator filter unit 200. The resonator-filter apparatus 200 mounts upstream of the engine manifold 206 and the throttle body 208. A duct 210 connects from the throttle body to the outlet side of the resonator 200 so that the resonator is in direct fluid connection to the noise source at the manifold 206. It can be appreciated that in the embodiment shown, the resonator filter apparatus 200 forms a portion of the duct upstream from the manifold 206. In this arrangement, additional space or ductwork to connect to a remote device is not required for filtering or noise reduction. It can also be appreciated that additional ductwork can be connected to the filter element 204 to draw air from a remote location.

Referring now to Figure 20, there is shown a second embodiment of a resonator and filter apparatus 220, including a filter portion 222 and resonator portion 224 seated together to form the filter and resonator unit 220. The resonator-filter apparatus 220 mounts upstream from the intake manifold 226 and throttle body 228 and is directly connected by a duct 230. In the embodiment shown, the filter and resonator apparatus are part of the duct which extends through the interior of the manifold so that no additional space is required. The manifold runners form the outer layer of the resonator chamber 224 to provide support while reducing the noise radiated by the resonator portion 224. It can be appreciated that the resonator portion 224 is directly connected by the duct 230 to the noise source for improved noise reduction. It can also be appreciated that additional ductwork can be connected to the inlet to draw air from a remote source.

As shown in Figure 21, another embodiment of a resonator/filter apparatus 240 is shown. The resonator filter apparatus is integrated into the intake manifold 248. In the embodiment shown, the Helmholtz resonator 242 includes a large volume within the arc of the manifold runners. In this manner, the manifold runners form the outer layer of the resonator volume and provide support while reducing the noise radiated by the volume's shell. Similar to other embodiments, the Helmholtz resonator tube joins the intake ducting intermediate the filter 244 and the throttle body 250. Thus, the resonator tube is integral to the intake plenum 252. The filter portion 244 is connected via a tube 246 to the resonator portion 242. The filter and resonator are upstream from the manifold 248 and the throttle body 250 and connected via an intake plenum 252. In the configuration shown, the filter element 244 is directly upstream from the plenum 252 and the manifold 248. It can be appreciated that the space on the interior of the manifold 248 is utilized as a resonator volume so that very little additional space is required. Moreover, the duct upstream from the plenum 252 has the filter element 244 integrated therein so that no additional space is required for the filter.

Referring now to Figure 22, there is shown a typical graph of noise attenuation in decibels over a range of frequencies attribut to the Helmholtz resonator structure. It can be appreciated that the loss is substantial, especially in the range between 70 and 100 hertz. The graph is shown for the Helmholtz resonator and filter apparatus 120 shown in Figures 14-16. By tuning the resonator structure 122 to match certain wavelengths for noise at corresponding frequencies, the overall noise is greatly reduced. Variation of volumes, lengths, diameters, and relative positions provide for elimination of targeted wave lengths.

If the resonator connecting tube length and volume are of constant area throughout and not prone to enlargements or constrictions, the Helmholtz resonator's peak noise attenuation frequency can be estimated using the relation:

   Where TAN is the trigonometric tangent function
  • π = 3.14159
  • C = speed of sound
  • lt= connecting tube length
  • lv= length of the volume that sound traverses
  • At = connecting tube area
  • Av = cross sectional area of the volume
  • fr= maximum noise loss frequency

The aforementioned equation can be applied to embodiments 60, 80, 100, 120 and 180.

If the resonator connecting tube or volume changes cross sectional area along the sound propagation length such as embodiment 150, the aforementioned formula cannot be used directly. In this case, the tube, volume and air cleaner must be computer modeled and its performance evaluated to accurately predict the resonant frequency. The aforementioned equation provides an approximation of the resonant frequency for a given volume and connecting tube. An alternative method to computer modeling is prototype construction, test and evaluation.

If the connecting tube and volume lengths are less than one tenth of the wavelength of the noise frequency of maximum loss, the Helmholtz equations, well known to those skilled in the art, can be used to relate the connecting tube length and area, volume and resonant frequency. However, generally this condition is violated by the connecting tube lengths for the embodiments shown and the frequency range of interest.

The attenuation in decibels cannot be estimated accurately because it depends on the flow losses in the connecting tube and entrances between the tube and volume. Test apparatus must be constructed and the attenuation measured.

It is to be understood, however, that even though numerous characteristics and advantages of the present invention have been set forth in the foregoing description, together with details of the structure and function of the invention, the disclosure is illustrative only, and changes may be made in detail, especially in matters of shape, size and arrangement of parts within the principles of the invention to the full extent indicated by the broad general meaning of the terms in which the appended claims are expressed.


Anspruch[de]
  1. Eine in eine Leitung integrierbare (in-line) Resonator- und Filter-Vorrichtung (60) für ein Gehäuse mit einer Strömung, die dort hindurch von stromaufwärts nach stromabwärts geht, mit
    • einem Filtermittel (52),
    • einer Resonationskammer, die in dem Gehäuse stromabwärts des Filtermittels im Bereich offener stromabwärts gerichteter Enden angeordnet ist;
    • einem Rohr (70), das in der Resonationskammer angeordnet ist;
    • wobei der Resonator und die Vorrichtung dadurch gekennzeichnet sind, dass
    • das Filtermittel in-line in dem Gehäuse angeordnet ist, das Filtermittel eine Kanallage (30) und mindestens eine Seitenlage (32) aufweist, welche Kanalkammerwände bilden, die eine Vielzahl von Kanalkammern (34) umgrenzen, die sich in Längsrichtung erstrecken, mit einem geschlossenen Ende und einem offenen Ende, wobei benachbarte Kammern alternierend einander gegenüberliegende offene und geschlossene Enden aufweisen, wobei Strömung in offene stromaufwärts gerichtete Enden und durch die Kanalkammerwände und aus offenen stromabwärts gerichteten Enden hinausfließt.
  2. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Filtermittel (52) und die Resonationskammern integral in einem einzelnen Gehäuse (68) ausgebildet sind.
  3. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 1 oder 2, wobei das Rohr (70) sich längs in dem Gehäuse erstreckt.
  4. Vorrichtung nach einem der Ansprüche 1 oder 2, wobei das kanulierte Filtermittel ein erstes Filterelement (62) und ein zweites Filterelement (62) aufweist, die Seite an Seite in dem Gehäuse angeordnet sind.
  5. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 4, wobei die Resonationskammer (68) die Filterelemente (62) umgibt.
  6. In-line Resonator- und Filter-Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Vorrichtung an einer Maschine anbringbar ist, wobei die Maschine einen Ansaugstutzen (206) aufweist, mit bogenförmigen Läufern, wobei die Resonationskammer (224) mit dem Einlass-Stutzen in Verbindung steht, der in einem von den Bogenteilen ausgebildeten Raum angeordnet ist.
  7. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Filterelement (84) einen rechtwinkligen Querschnitt aufweist.
  8. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das Filtermittel ein Filtermodul (204) aufweist und die Resonationskammer in einem Resonator-Modul (202) ausgebildet ist, das zum Kontakt mit dem Filtermodul konfiguriert ist.
  9. In-line Resonator- und Filter-Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 1, wobei das kanulierte Filtermittel erste und zweite parallele Filterelemente (62) aufweist, die sich längs in dem Gehäuse erstrecken.
  10. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 9, wobei das Rohr (70) koaxial mit einem Auslass (66) ist,
  11. Vorrichtung nach einem der Ansprüche 9 oder 10, wobei jedes der Filterelemente (62) zugeordnete Dichtungsmittel (64) aufweist.
  12. Vorrichtung nach einem der Ansprüche 9 bis 11, wobei die Filterelemente (62) zylindrisch sind.
  13. In-line Resonator- und Filter-Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 1, zusätzlich mit:
    • einer ringförmigen Rohrbaugruppe mit einem ersten Rohr (138), das mit der stromabwärts gerichteten Seite des Filterelementes in Verbindung steht, und einem zweiten Rohr (136), das sich koaxial mit dem ersten Rohr radial nach außen von dem ersten Rohr erstreckt und sich an einem stromaufwärts gerichteten Ende zu der Resonationskammer (142) öffnet.
  14. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 1, zusätzlich mit ersten und zweiten Resonatoren (172, 168), die koaxial mit dem Gehäuse (156) ausgerichtet sind.
  15. Vorrichtung nach Anspruch 14, wobei der erste Resonator (172) eine Kammer aufweist, mit einem rohrförmigen Bereich (166), der sich in die Kammer von dem stromabwärts gerichteten Ende erstreckt.
  16. Vorrichtung nach einem der Ansprüche 14 oder 15, wobei der zweite Resonator (168) eine Kammer aufweist, die den ersten Resonator umgibt und Fluidströmung aus dem Filterelement (162) aufnimmt.
  17. Vorrichtung nach einem der Ansprüche 14 bis 16, wobei ein Auslass einen Bereich einer stromabwärts gerichteten Leitung (252) aufweist mit einem reduzierten Querschnitt, und wobei der rohrförmige Abschnitt sich mindestens teilweise in den Auslass erstreckt.
  18. Vorrichtung nach einem der Ansprüche 1 - 3, wobei das Filtermittel und die Resonationskammer koaxial ausgerichtet sind.
  19. Vorrichtung nach einem der Ansprücche 1 - 5 oder 18, wobei das Gehäuse (82) einen Einlass (88) aufweist sowie einen Auslass (90), der koaxial mit dem Einlass ist.
Anspruch[en]
  1. An in-line resonator and filter apparatus (60) for a housing having flow therethrough from upstream to downstream, comprising:
    • filtering means (52)
    • a resonating chamber positioned within the housing downstream of the filtering means proximate open downstream ends;
    • a tube (70) located within the resonating chamber;
    • said resonator and apparatus being characterized by
    • said filtering means being positioned inline in the housing, the filtering means comprising a fluting sheet (30) and at least one facing sheet (32) forming flute chamber walls defining a plurality of flute chambers (34) extending in a longitudinal direction having one closed end and one open end, wherein adjacent chambers have alternating opposite open and closed ends, wherein flow passes into open upstream ends through the flute chamber walls and out open downstream ends.
  2. An apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the filtering means (52) and resonating chambers are integrally formed in a single housing (68).
  3. An apparatus according to any of claims 1 or 2, wherein the tube (70) extends longitudinally in the housing.
  4. An apparatus according to any of claims 1 or 2, wherein the fluted filtering means comprises a first filter element (62) and a second filter element (62) located side by side in the housing.
  5. An apparatus according to claim 4, wherein the resonating chamber (68) surrounds the filter elements (62).
  6. An in-line resonator and filter apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the apparatus mounts to an engine, the engine having an intake manifold (206) with arcing runners, wherein the resonating chamber (224) connects to the intake manifold located within a space formed by the arcing members.
  7. An apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the filter element (84) has a rectangular cross-section.
  8. An apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the filtering means comprises a filter module (204), and the resonating chamber is formed in a resonator module (202) configured for engaging the filter module.
  9. An in-line resonator and filter apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the fluted filtering means comprises first and second parallel filter elements (62) extending longitudinally in the housing;
  10. An apparatus according to claim 9, wherein the tube (70) is coaxial with an outlet (66).
  11. An apparatus according to any of claims 9-10, wherein each of the filter elements (62) includes associated sealing means (64).
  12. An apparatus according to any of claims 9 - 11, wherein the filter elements (62) are cylindrical.
  13. An in-line resonator and filter apparatus according to claim 1, further comprising:
    • an annular tube assembly including a first tube (138) coupled to the downstream side of the filter element, and a second tube (136) extending coaxially with the first tube radially outward from the first tube and opening at an upstream end to the resonating chamber (142).
  14. An apparatus according to claim 1, further comprising first and second resonators (172, 168) coaxially aligned with the housing (156).
  15. An apparatus according to claim 14, wherein the first resonator (172) comprises a chamber having a tubular portion (166) extending into the chamber from the downstream side.
  16. An apparatus according to any of claims 14 or 15, wherein the second resonator (168) comprises a chamber surrounding the first resonator and receiving fluid flow from the filter element (162).
  17. An apparatus according to any of claims 14 - 16, wherein an outlet comprises a portion of a downstream duct (252) having a reduced cross-section, and wherein the tubular portion extends at least partially into the outlet.
  18. An apparatus according to any of claims 1-3, wherein the filtering means and resonating chamber are coaxially aligned.
  19. An apparatus according to any of claims 1-5 or 18, wherein the housing (82) includes an inlet (88) and an outlet (90) coaxial with the inlet.
Anspruch[fr]
  1. Appareil formant résonateur et filtre en ligne (60) pour un boîtier que traverse un flux d'amont en aval, comprenant :
    • des moyens de filtrage (52)
    • une chambre de résonance positionnée à l'intérieur du boîtier en aval des moyens de filtrage à proximité d'extrémités en aval ouvertes ;
    • un tuyau (70) situé à l'intérieur de la chambre de résonance ;
    • ledit appareil formant résonateur et filtre étantcaractérisé par le fait que :
      • lesdits moyens de filtrage sont positionnés en ligne dans le boîtier, les moyens de filtrage comprenant une tôle ondulée (30) et au moins une tôle lui faisant face (32) qui forment des parois de chambre ondulées définissant une pluralité de chambres ondulées (34) s'étendant dans un sens longitudinal, présentant une extrémité ouverte et une extrémité fermée, dans lequel des chambres adjacentes possèdent des extrémités ouvertes et fermées opposées et qui s'alternent, où un flux passe dans des extrémités en amont ouvertes, traverse les parois de chambres ondulées et sort par des extrémités en aval ouvertes.
  2. Appareil selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les moyens de filtrage (52) et les chambres de résonance forment un seul tenant dans un boîtier unique (68).
  3. Appareil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 ou 2, dans lequel le tube (70) s'étend de manière longitudinale dans le boîtier.
  4. Appareil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 ou 2, dans lequel les moyens de filtrage ondulés comprennent un premier élément filtrant (62) et un second élément filtrant (62) situés côte à côte dans le boîtier.
  5. Appareil selon la revendication 4, dans lequel la chambre de résonance (68) entoure les éléments filtrants (62).
  6. Appareil formant résonateur et filtre en ligne selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'appareil se monte sur un moteur, le moteur présentant un collecteur d'admission (206) doté de canaux d'amorçage d'arc, dans lequel la chambre de résonance (224) est reliée au collecteur d'admission situé à l'intérieur de l'espace formé par les éléments d'amorçage d'arc.
  7. Appareil selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'élément filtrant (84) présente une coupe transversale rectangulaire.
  8. Appareil selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les moyens de filtrage comprennent un module de filtre (204) et la chambre de résonance est formée dans un module de résonateur (202) configuré pour venir en prise avec le module de filtre.
  9. Appareil formant résonateur et filtre en ligne selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les moyens de filtrage ondulés comprennent des premier et second éléments filtrants parallèles (62) s'étendant longitudinalement dans le boîtier.
  10. Appareil selon la revendication 9, dans lequel le tuyau (70) est coaxial à un orifice de sortie (66).
  11. Appareil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 9 et 10, dans lequel chacun des éléments filtrants (62) comprend des moyens de scellement associés (64).
  12. Appareil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 9 à 11, dans lequel les éléments filtrants (62) sont cylindriques.
  13. Appareil formant résonateur et filtre en ligne selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre :
    • un ensemble de tuyaux annulaires comprenant un premier tuyau (138) couplé au côté situé en aval de l'élément filtrant, et un second tuyau (136) s'étendant coaxialement au premier tuyau radialement vers l'extérieur depuis le premier tuyau et s'ouvrant au niveau d'une extrémité située en amont sur la chambre de résonance (142).
  14. Appareil selon la revendication 1, comprenant en outre des premier et second résonateurs (172, 168) coaxialement alignés avec le boîtier (156).
  15. Appareil selon la revendication 14, dans lequel le premier résonateur (172) comprend une chambre ayant une partie tubulaire (166) qui s'étend dans la chambre à partir du côté situé en aval.
  16. Appareil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 14 ou 15, dans lequel le second résonateur (168) comprend une chambre qui entoure le premier résonateur et reçoit un écoulement de liquide provenant de l'élément filtrant (162).
  17. Appareil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 14 à 16, dans lequel un orifice de sortie comprend une partie d'un conduit situé en aval (252) présentant une section transversale réduite, et dans lequel la partie tubulaire s'étend au moins partiellement à l'intérieur de l'orifice de sortie.
  18. Appareil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 3, dans lequel les moyens filtrants et la chambre de résonance sont coaxialement alignés.
  19. Appareil selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 5 ou 18, dans lequel le boîtier (82) comprend un orifice d'entrée (88) et un orifice de sortie (90) coaxiaux à l'entrée.






IPC
A Täglicher Lebensbedarf
B Arbeitsverfahren; Transportieren
C Chemie; Hüttenwesen
D Textilien; Papier
E Bauwesen; Erdbohren; Bergbau
F Maschinenbau; Beleuchtung; Heizung; Waffen; Sprengen
G Physik
H Elektrotechnik

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