PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP1062547 23.01.2003
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 1062547
Titel TRANSPARENTE UND SEMITRANSPARENTE BEUGUNGSELEMENTE, INSBESONDERE HOLOGRAMME, UND IHRE HERSTELLUNG
Anmelder OVD Kinegram AG, Zug, CH
Erfinder VLCEK, Miroslav, 530 12 Pardubice, CZ;
SKLENAR, Ales, 500 02 Hradec Králove, CZ
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
DE-Aktenzeichen 69904452
Vertragsstaaten AT, BE, CH, DE, DK, ES, FI, FR, GB, IT, LI, LU, NL, PT, SE
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 11.03.1999
EP-Aktenzeichen 999060254
WO-Anmeldetag 11.03.1999
PCT-Aktenzeichen PCT/CZ99/00007
WO-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0099047983
WO-Veröffentlichungsdatum 23.09.1999
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 27.12.2000
EP date of grant 11.12.2002
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 23.01.2003
IPC-Hauptklasse G03H 1/02

Beschreibung[en]
Background of the invention

This invention relates to an improvement of transparent and semitransparent diffractive elements and more particularly to transparent and semitransparent type holograms and their making process These diffractive elements are themselves transparent or semitransparent in the visible (VIS) and/or near infrared (NIR) spectral regionsand yet are also endowed with the characteristics of a reflection type element being observed under suitable angle. It means that reproduction in the transparent or semitransparent element of the present invention is effected only within a specific reproduction angle range, while no hologram is recognised at other ordinary angles. This leads to the advantage that there is no visual obstruction of the article on which the diffractive element is laminated. Fig. 1 shows the basic constitution of the transparent or semitransparent diffractive element according to the present invention.

State of the art

Demand for holograms has grown not only as the way of the record of sound or information but as the elements used in such activities of human beings as advertisement, security sector, safety technique, protection of product originality, money counterfeit protection etc.

It is well known that one of the following replication technologies is usually used for mass production of any diffractive elements in suitable polymer materials - hot embossing, injection moulding and casting.

Relief microstructure (master copy) is produced by one of the many high resolution fabrication technologies, the most commonly used being holographic exposure of suitable photosensitive material, including chalcogenides (US 3,825,317), direct writing with focused laser and e-beam, optical photolithography with subsequent wet or dry etching.

In most cases, a nickel shim or stamper is electroformed or replica is produced through casting into epoxy resin. These replicas are used for own mass production of copies into polymers using injection moulding (CD fabrication), casting (production of gratings for spectrophotometers) or hot embossing, for example into transparent foil (M.T. Gale; J. of Imaging Science and Technology 41 (3) (1997) 211).

Transparent polymeric materials such as polyethylene with index of refraction n = 1.5 - 1.54, polypropylene n = 1,49, polystyrene 1,6, polyvinyl chloride 1,52 - 1,55, polyester resin 1.52 - 1,57 etc. (for more examples see US patent 4856857) or copolymers (for correction of index of refraction) can be used for transparent or semitransparent holograms and other diffractive elements production. Low refraction index value of these polymers or copolymers prepared from them determines their low reflectance (R about 4 %), hence the holographic effect of diffractive structure developed in layers of these polymers is insufficient (US patent 4856857). Under the term "holographic effect" used in the following text we will understand the phenomenon, that the hologram is very intensive in reflected light at suitable angle of observation. Low reflected intensity and thus the drawback of poor brightness of diffractive element recorded in the polymer layer is usually passed by forming a thin metallic film (generally Al) on the relief forming face of transparent polymeric layer (M. Miler Holography - theoretical and experimental fundamentals and their application, SNTL, Prague 1974 (in Czech); M.T. Gale: J. of Imaging Science and Technology 41 (3) (1997)211).

Strong improvement of brightness achieved at the cost of loss of the transparency is the main drawback of such technique. Transparency or at least semitransparency of diffractive element is required or desired in many applications (for example protective diffractive elements on banknotes, identity cards with photo etc.). Some technical applications of diffractive elements are directly conditioned by transparency or semitransparency of created element ( for example microlense array for CCD cameras, polarising filters etc.).

It is further known that to preserve (or to decrease only partly) the transparency of diffractive element and at the same time to improve holographic effect of the hologram recorded in the polymeric layer (further called layer 1), it is necessary to cover layer 1 by other transparent layer (further called layer 2) of different material (further called holographic effect enhancing material) which has in general different index of refraction n (i.e. higher or lower ) than material of the transparent layer 1 (US patent 4856857, US patent 5700550, US patent 5300764). The higher difference in index of refraction of polymeric bearing layer 1 and holographic effect-enhancing layer 2, the higher holographic effect can be achieved (US patent 4856857).

It is as well known that very thin layer (with thickness to the limit 20 nm) of suitable metal (e.g. Cr, Te, Ge) can be used as such layer 2 deposited on the transparent layer 1 in which a hologram has been hot-formed. Such very thin metallic layer being used, relatively high transparency is preserved. Relatively strong enhancing of holographic effect can be achieved when the index of refraction of deposited metallic layer is either significantly lower (e.g. Ag n = 0,8; Cu n 0,7) or significantly higher (e.g. Cr n = 3,3, Mn n = 2,5, Te n = 4,9) than index of refraction of transparent layer 1 (n about 1,5), (US patent 4856857). Such thin metallic layers are deposited at transparent, diffractive element bearing layer 1 by vacuum deposition technique. The drawback of the application of thin metallic layer as holographic effect enhancing material is relatively high melting point of these materials and therefore difficult evaporating of many of these metals. An additional drawback is high absorption coefficient of metals. Already slight deviations in the thickness of evaporated metal layer implicate significant deviations in the transmissivity of the system (layer 1 - bearing diffractive element + layer 2 - metal) and moreover upper limit of the permissible thickness is very low (it depends on the metal, but in general it must not exceed 20 nm (US patent 4856857)). According to our measurements evaporation of either 10 nm thick Cr layer or 4 nm thick Ge layer on the polymeric layer decreases its transmissivity down to about 30 % (see Fig. 2).

In the present art, oxides of metals (e.g. ZnO, PbO, Fe2O3, La2O3, MgO etc.), halogenide materials (e.g. TICl, CuBr, CIF3, ThF4 etc.) eventually more complex dielectric materials (e.g. KTa0,65Nb0,35O3, Bi4(GeO4)3, RbH2AsO4 etc.) are used single or possibly in several layers deposited criss-cross as holographic effect enhancing layers (US patent 4856857). The drawback of the application of these materials is the fact that their index of refraction values are very close to the index of refraction of transparent polymeric layer 1 (e.g. index of refraction values are 1,5 for ThF4, 1,5 for SiO2, 1,6 for Al2O3, 1,6 for RhH2AsO4 etc.) (US patent 486857). Accordingly an amplification of holographic effect is relatively low. Many of these materials require again relatively high temperature for their evaporation and not least some of them are quite expensive or hardly prepareable, what obstructs their mass application.

Further it is known, that binary chalcogenides of zinc and cadmium as well as compounds Sb2S3 and PbTe (US patent 4856857), eventually multilayer systems of these chalcogenides with oxides or halides (US patent 5700550) or multilayer system ZnS and Na3AlF6 (US patent 5300764) can be used as holographic effect enhancing. These materials are endowed with satisfactory index of refraction values (e.g. 3,0 for Sb2S3, 2,6 for ZnSe, 2,1 for ZnS). But short wavelength absorption edge of many of these materials (e.g. Sb2S3, CdSe, CdTe, ZnTe) lies within near IR region only and these materials are characterised by high values of absorption coefficient in VIS. Similarly with metal layer used as layer 2, only very thin layers of these materials can be used as holographic effect enhancing layer 2 to achieve at least semitransparency of final product. Transparency is again significantly influenced by thickness deviations. Additional significant drawback of these materials is their difficult vaporization (again similarity with metals) given by their high values of their melting points Tg alfa - ZnS 1700 °C, beta - ZnS 1020 °C, ZnSe >1100 °C, ZnTe 1238 °C, CdS 1750 °C, CdSe > 1350 °C, CdTe 1121 °C, PbTe 917 °C) (Handbook of Chemistry and Physics 64th Edition 1983/84).

In the present art the process according to the scheme given in Fig. 3 is usually used in the mass production of transparent diffractive elements. Firstly a diffractive pattern is made in the layer 1, after it a thin dielectric or metallic layer is evaporated (perpendicularly or under specific incidence angle) a subsequently this evaporated layer is overlapped or laminated by another polymeric layer (M.T. Gale: Joumal of Imaging Science and Technology 41 (3) (1997) 211). As above mentioned materials (metals, their oxides, halides, binary chalcogenides of Zn and Cd, Sb2S3 and PbTe) are used as layer 2 in the production of diffractive elements by this way, the method has the same drawbacks, e.g. high melting temperatures determine difficult deposition, even small deviations in the thickness cause large deviations in the transmissivity, comparable index of refraction of many of these materials with index of refraction of polymeric layer 1, eventually full non transparency in VIS.

Further it is known that holographic tape (relief phase holograms shaped in a vinyl tape) have improved scratch resistance being covered with such materials as waxes, polymers and inorganic compounds, besides others arsenic sulphide can be used (US patent 3 703 407). In addition the coating enables tapes to be lubricated and enables tapes to be used in a liquid gate tape transport mechanism. In order to maintain the same diffraction efficiency as an uncoated tape, the minimum depth of this coating must be greater than the maximum peak-to-valley depth of any corrugation (US patent 3 703 407).

The document US 4 856 857 discloses a diffractive transparent element consisting of at least two layers having different refractive indices. The first layer is a transparent polymer in which a diffraction pattern is formed. The second layer enhances the holographic effect, has a higher refractive index than the first layer, comprises chalcogenides and sulphur, and has a melting point of about 550°C.

This document also discloses a corresponding production method.

The features of the preambles of independent claims 1, 4 and 5 are knonw in combination from this document.

Subject matter of the invention

The present invention does away with the drawbacks of the present-day techniques of transparent and semitransparent diffractive elements production.

Transparent and semitransparent diffractive elements, particularly holograms, consisting at least of two layers with different index of refraction, whereof a first bearing layer (1) is a transparent polymer or copolymer having index of refraction lower than 1,7 and on said first bearing layer is deposited a second to exposure sensitive holographic effect enhancing high refraction index layer (2) constituted by substances based on chalcogenides with an index of refraction higher than 1,7 and a melting temperature lower than 900 °C, characterized in that the first diffractive pattern is mechanically shaped in the bearing layer (1) and/or in the the high refraction index layer (2) and at least one further second diffractive pattern is formed in the exposure sensitive high refraction index layer (2) constituted by substances based on chalcogenides comprising at least one of the elements from the group sulphur, selenium, tellurium, said chalcogenide based substances being selected from the group of binary, ternary and even more complex chalcogenide and/or chalcohalogenide systems, containing, in addition to S or Se or Te, as a more electropositive element some of the elements Cu, Ag, Au, Hg, B, Al, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, N, P, As, Sb, Bi.

Chalcogenides based matters can contain further transient metal and/or at least one rare earth element, e.g. Pr, Eu, Dy.

Transparent or semitransparent diffractive element can further consists of other layers e,g. protective layer, adhesive layer, fragile layer, anchor layer. Protective layer protects layer 2 or layer 1 against environmental effect or against undesirable effect of consecutive exposure by UV light and improves tesistivity of the final product. The layer can either be permanent part of the hologram or of the diffractive element or can be removable. Adhesive layer allows unrepeatable or repeatable anchoring of the hologram or other diffractive element on protected article, printed document etc. The function of fragile layer is to adhere the upper layer and the lower layer and yet effect destruction of diffractive element during peeling for the purpose of forgery. Anchor layer is used to improve adhesivity of diffractive element to the base supporting sheet or to releasable sheet in the case of application as seal, sticker, label etc.

Transparent layer 1 can be inseparable part of some larger product, in such case the high refraction index layer 2 can be for example sprayed on the layer 1.

Production processes of such transparent and semitransparent diffractive elements are defined in independent claims 4 and 5.

If the depth of diffractive pattern is greater than the thickness of high refraction index layer 2 (very common situation), practically identical product (Fig. 1) is obtained as when the previous procedure is used. If the embossing depths are lower than thickness of high refraction index layer, the layer 1 operates as carrier of high refraction index layer 2 only. After that the second diffractive patterns are formed in the said to exposure sensitive high refraction index layer 2.

High refraction index layer can be deposited on a previously coloured layer 1 and thus through the combination of their colours (colour of layer 2 depending on the composition and thickness used) a required colour effect of transparent or semitransparent diffractive element can be achieved.

High refraction index layer 2 can be deposited either at low pressure e.g. using vacuum evaporation, sputtering or chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique or at normal pressure as solution of chalcogenide based matters using e.g. spraying, painting or spin coating method.

The composition of high refraction index layer 2 formed with some chalcogenide based matters can be modified by exposure or annealing induced diffusion of metals and/or by halogens and/or oxygen, which are implanted into layer 2 by interaction of the layer 2 with halogen vapours or oxygen or by air hydrolysis.

The sensation of the first diffractive pattern shaped mechanically in layer 1 and/or layer 2 is modified by second diffractive pattern formed in layer 2 by exposure and/or annealing and/or by selective etching.

Exposure with radiation of suitable wavelength and intensity (values depend on the particular composition of high refraction index layer (2), e-beam, ions, X-ray radiation etc.) or annealing originates structural changes in high refraction index layer or it originates even changes in its chemical composition (e.g. diffusion of metal, which is in direct contact with high refraction index layer, hydrolysis, oxidation). Thereby a change of the value of index of refraction of layer 2 takes place (it usually increases) and thus the difference between values of index of refraction of bearing layer 1 and high refraction index layer 2 is modified. It results in a different optical perception of the product. A chemical reaction induced by exposure or by annealing, e.g. with surrounding atmosphere, can result in the transformation of chalcogenide material into fully different compound (e.g. oxide); the product of such reaction must again satisfy the condition, that its index of refraction is higher than 1,7.

Local exposure through the mask or holographic exposure or local annealing can produce a record of the further second diffractive pattern into the high refraction index layer 2; the record can be either amplitude (based on different absorption coefficient of exposed and unexposed part of layer 2) or phase type based on either different values of index of refraction of exposed and unexposed parts of layer 2 or based on different thickness of exposed and unexposed parts of the layer 2 (different thickness can be achieved not only directly during exposure but also by consecutive etching of layer 2 by using well-known methods); even here can be used the phenomenon of local photoinduced diffusion, hydrolysis, oxidation etc. and the matter of high refraction index layer 2 can, in the place of local exposure or annealing change its chemical composition; resulting record in the high refraction index layer 2 can partly modify visual perception of the hologram and In addition it can be seen in view-through.

As index of refraction values of majority of chalcogenides exceed the value n = 2, application of chalcogenides layers as holographic effect enhancing layer 2 deposited on the transparent polymeric layers 1 with n < 1,7 results generally in a significant visual perception.

The transparency of final hologram or other diffractive element can be influenced through the thickness of layer 2.

Another important advantage of chalcogenide materials is the fact, that they can be synthesised in many systems in amorphous state and their glass forming regions are relatively wide. Being amorphous, these materials have not only very low scattering losses, but the possibility to prepare even nonstochiometric compounds takes place. Gradual mutual substitution of elements (not only S, Se and Te) in the composition of amorphous chalcogenides causes continuous changes in their index of refraction and reflectivity. Thus enhancement of holographic effect can be "tailored".

As a result of gradual mutual substitution of elements in the composition of amorphous chalcogenides arise gradual changes of their optical gap Egopt values (e.g. As40S60 Egopt = 2,37 eV. As40S40Se20 2.07 eV, As40Se60 1,8 eV) followed by gradual changes in the position of short wavelength absorption edge. Thus the colour (for given thickness) of layer 2 can be changed as well and transparent and semitransparent systems of different colours endowed with high holographic effect can be produced. So even colourless polymeric layers 1 can be used for production of transparent or semitransparent diffractive elements of required colour using one (or more) chalcogenide based layer of suitable composition as a layer 2. Thus composition and thickness of chalcogenide layer 2 influence significantly the transparency of final product (hologram) (Fig. 4) and reflectivity (Fig. 5) and thus intensity of holographic perception (it increases with the reflectivity of layer 2).

Amorphous chalcogenides are mainly as thin layers photosensitive to exposure with radiation of suitable intensity and vawelength (given by composition of the layer), e-beam, ions etc. This property enables us to provide an supplementary correction of index of refraction, reflectivity and transmissivity of high refraction index thin layer using exposure induced structural changes (Fig. 6), by exposure induced reaction of photosensitive chalcogenide layer with metal (e.g. Ag) (Fig. 6) or with gas (O2, air humidity) induced transformation into different chemical substance, which must satisfy the condition that n > 1.7. Similar effect can be achieved by annealing.

If exposure or annealing are local only, procedures mentioned in the previous paragraph can result in the formation of an image (including holographic one) in the high refraction index layer, which can partly modify visual perception of the hologram and in addition it can be seen in view-through. Sectional views of structures developed using photoinduced structural changes and photoinduced metal diffusion are presented in Fig. 7 and 8.

Further advantage of above mentioned chalcogenides are their low melting temperatures (usually 100 - 300 °C). They can be therefore deposited by worldwide commonly used vacuum evaporation method. As the values of absorption coefficient in the region behind short vawelength absorption edge are low, even possible small deviation in the thickness influences much less the holographic effect enhancing than when thin metallic layers are used. Large areas of chalcogenide layers can be formed relatively easily using corresponding vacuum evaporation equipment. The thickness of the chalcogenide layer 2 can be adjusted by synchronising the evaporation rate with the feed speed of transparent bearing layer 1.

Further advantage of amorphous chalcogenides is the fact, that mass production of chalcogenides of many compositions exist worldwide and they are thus immediately commercially available at affordable price.

Brief description of the drawings

  • Fig. 1 Sectional view of the diffractive element of the present invention, 1 -transparent bearing polymeric layer with n1 < 1,7, 2 - high refraction index chalcogenide based layer with n2 > 1,7
  • Fig. 2 Optical transmissivity T and reflectivity R of holograms produced by deposition of thin high diffractive index layer 2 formed by Cr or Ge on polyethylene layer 1 with hot embossed diffractive pattern
  • Fig. 3 Sectional views of sequence creation of transparent diffractive element based on the possibility of creation a diffractive pattern in bearing layer 1 and exploiting of the difference in index of refraction of layers number 1 and 2.
  • Fig. 4 Optical transmissivity of holograms produced by deposition of thin high diffractive index layer 2 formed by selected chalcogenide materials on polyethylene layer 1 with hot embossed diffractive pattern
  • Fig. 5 Reflectivity of holograms produced by deposition of thin high diffractive index layer 2 formed by selected chalcogenide materials on polyethylene layer 1 with hot embossed diffractive pattern
  • Fig. 6 Changes in optical transmissivity T of holograms created by photoexposure and by diffusion of Ag according to the techniques described in example 2 and 3.
  • Fig. 7 Sectional views of sequential steps of creation of transparent hologram or other diffractive element based on the possibility of creation of a diffractive pattern in bearing layer 1, exploiting the difference in index of refraction of layers number 1 and 2 and the photosensitivity of high refraction index chalcogenide layer 2.
  • Fig. 8. Sectional views of sequential steps of creation of transparent hologram or other diffractive element based on the possibility of creation a diffractive pattern in bearing layer 1, exploiting the difference in the index of refraction of layers number 1 and 2 and 5 (n1, n2 n5) and the photoinduced diffusion of metal 4 into chalcogenide layer 2 leading to origin metal doped high refraction index chalcogenide layer 5.
  • Fig. 9. Sectional view of possible final product - transparent hologram transfer sheet, which once being stuck on the protected article can not be peeled off without its destruction.

Examples of design

Following examples are given for better understanding of the present invention. Transparent polyethyleneterephthalate foil (n = 1,58) with thickness 50 µm or polycarbonate foil (n = 1,59) with thickness 60 µm were employed as layer 1 satisfying condition n < 1,7. Diffractive patterns were stamped into these layers using Ni shim and hot embossing method. Holograms and other diffractive elements, which were characterised by very low holographic effect, were further treated by some of the following processes given in examples 1 to 6. Application of thin chalcogenide layer as holographic effect enhancing, high refraction index layer 2 (Fig. 1) is the common vein in all these examples. The possibility to modify hologram or another diffractive element prepared by technique given in example 1 using well known phenomenon of photoinduced changes of the structure and properties of chalcogenides used as high refraction index layer 2 is demonstrated in examples 2 - 4. Example 7 is demonstration of relief pattern production by stamping or pressing the pattern into system polymeric layer 1 - chalcogenide high refraction index layer 2 created in advance. All methods of fabrication of holograms or other diffractive elements fabrication given in Examples 1 - 7 can be used for production of more complicated final products, sectional view of one of them is given in Fig. 9. Example of one simpler application of transparent holograms is given in the Example 8.

Example 1 (not claimed)

Thin layers (d = 10 - 500 nm) of Ge30Sb10S60 composition (n = 2,25) were deposited by vacuum evaporation method (deposition rate 1 nm/sec, pressure 5.10-4 Pa) on bearing layer 1 from the side of relief pattern fabricated beforehand in layer 1. In all cases sufficient holographic effect has been achieved as a result of a greater reflected light intensity. Relatively high transparency of prepared system has been preserved. Reflectivity (Fig. 5 curves 1,2) and transmissivity (Fig. 4 curves 2, 5 and Fig. 6 curve for d = 30 nm) of obtained structures depend on the thickness of deposited high refraction index layer 2. Thicker layers (of the order hundreds nanometers) being used, spectral dependence of the optical transmissivity and reflectivity was influenced strongly by interference phenomena, as vawelength of VIS and NIR radiation is comparable with thickness of high refraction index layer 2.

Similar results were obtained when other chalcogenide materials, e.g. Ge20Sb25Se55 (n = 3,11), As50Ge20Se30 (n = 2,95), (As0.33S0.67)90Te10 (n= 2,3) were applied as layer 2. Results of application of further chalcogenide based systems Ag8As36.9Se55,1, Ge20Sb10S70, As40S40Se20, As20Se40Te40 as layers 2 satisfying condition n > 1,7 are given in Fig. 4 - 6. Similar results were achieved when other binary (e.g. Se90Te10, Ge33S67), ternary (e.g. (As0.33S0.67)95I5) or even more complicated (e.g. As40S40Se10Ge10) chalcogenides were applied as layer 2. Thin layers of more complicated systems can be prepared either by vacuum evaporation of bulk samples of the same composition or by simultaneous evaporation of more simple chalcogenides from two boats (e.g. As40S60, Ge33S67, As40Se60 etc.). Enhancement of holographic effect has been achieved as well when chalcogenide layers were deposited sequentially, e.g. two different holographic effect enhancing layers were deposited sequentially. Thin layers of some chalcogenides (mainly of sulphides, e.g. Ge33S67) are relatively unstable in the air and can be hydrolysed, thus oxygen can be built in their structure.

Even thus hydrolysed layers operate as holographic effect enhancing layers

Example 2

Thin layer AS42S58 with thickness 100 nm was deposited by technique presented in example 1 on the carrying layer 1. Thus a significant holographic enhancing effect was achieved and the hologram recorded in carrying layer 1 was clearly visible under suitable angle of observation.

The system prepared by this way was modified using above described phenomenon of photoinduced structural change in high refraction index layer 2 (where exposed, the layer is transformed into a state marked as number 3 in Fig, 7). Exposition of the system from the index of refraction layer 2 side by UV lamp (I = 18 mW/cm2) for 300 sec caused a changed optical transimissivity of the system (Fig. 6) accompanied with increase of index of refraction value for about 0,1 and thus holographic effect was enhanced as well. Local exposure through the mask caused only local changes in the transmissivity and index of refraction (layer 3 in Fig.7) and thus a negative picture (exposed parts are less transparent) of used mask was developed in As42S58 layer, which can be seen in view-through and modifies the optical perception of the hologram recorded in the layer 1 when this is observed in reflection.

Similar results were achieved when after deposition of As42S58 layer, still before its exposure, the system layer 1 - layer 2 was treated in iodine vapours, what transformed composition of layer 2 into As-S-I (real composition depends on the temperature and concentration of I2). Even without subsequent exposure chalcohalide As-S-I layer had an enhanced holographic effect.

Example 3

Thin Ge30Sb10S60 layer with thickness 30 nm and subsequently 10 nm thin Ag layer (layer 4 in Fig. 8) were deposited by technique presented in example 1 on carrying layer 1. Consecutive 300 sec exposure with Xe lamp (I = 20 mW/cm2) induced diffusion of Ag into Ge30Sb10S60 layer, which was local only when exposition was provided through the mask (new composition layer Ag-Ge30Sb10S60, marked as layer 5 in Fig 8). New Ag-Ge30Sb10S60 layer has generally a higher value of index of refraction than Ge30Sb10S60 layer, final value depending on the amount of diffused silver. Excessive, unreacted Ag was striped by dipping in diluted HNO3 (1:1) and thus the picture of the mask was recorded into original layer 2. This picture can be seen in view-through and modifies optical perception of the hologram recorded in the layer 1 when this is observed in reflection.

Example 4

Final product fabricated in example 3 was further immersed in 0,02 mol/l KOH solvent, in which only high refraction index layer 2 is partly soluble. Layer 5 is resistant against this solvent. Thus a relief picture is formed in chalcogenide layer which can be seen in view-through and which again modifies optical perception of the hologram recorded in the layer 1 when this is observed in reflection.

Example 5 (not claimed)

Thin layer (d = 40 nm) of Ge24.5Ga10.2S64.8Pr0,35 was deposited by vacuum evaporation method (deposition rate 1 nm/sec, pressure 5.10-4 Pa) on the bearing layer 1 from the side of relief pattern fabricated beforehand in layer 1. Application of these materials as a high refraction index layer resulted again in the enhancement of the holographic effect, e.g. hologram recorded in carrying layer 1 was well seen when observed under specific angle.

Example 6 (not claimed)

Thin As40S60 layer was deposited using spin coating method at normal pressure on the polycarbonate bearing layer 1 from the side of relief pattern fabricated beforehand in layer 1. Starting solution As40S60 in n-propylamine was used in concentration 0,8 mol/l. Thicknesses of prepared layers were in range 0,5 - 2 µm. Deposition of As40S60 layer again led to partial improvement of optical perception of the hologram recorded in the layer 1 when this was observed in reflection.

Similar results were achieved when solutions of As33S67 or AS40S60 in n-propylamine or triethylamine were used either for spin coating deposition or these solvents were only painted on bearing layer 1.

Example 7

Thin As35S65 layer (d = 30 nm) was deposited by vacuum evaporation method on polycarbonate bearing layer 1. Relief structure was stamped into this bilayer from the side of high refraction index layer 2 by hot embossing at temperature about 150 °C. After a couple of minutes at this temperature, the whole system was cooled down and only after that thrust released. The product had similar properties as when As35S65 layer of identical thickness was used to prepare hologram by the technique described in Example 1. An identical result was achieved when As35S65 layer was deposited on layer 1 by CVD method.

Examples 8 (not claimed)

Thin layers (d = 20 nm) of Ge30Sb10S60 composition (n = 2,25) was deposited by vacuum evaporation method (deposition rate 1 nm/sec, pressure 5.10-4 Pa) on bearing layer 1 from the side of relief pattern beforehand fabricated in layer 1. Obtained hologram was set on document with text and photo (which had to be protected by applicated transparent hologram) and sealed with the document into 175 µm thick polyester foil provided with fusible paste. With regard to high transparency of the hologram (45% - 85 % in spectral region 400 - 750 nm, see Fig. 4 curve 5) were both, text and photo, very well readable and at the same time with regard to high reflection (24-15%, Fig. 5 curve 2) the hologram formed in the bearing layer 1 was very well seen being observed under specific angle.

Similar results (with different level of transparency and holographic effectiveness depending on the composition and thickness of layer 2) were obtained when other holograms endowed with enhanced holographic effect caused by application of chalcogenide thin layer 2 prepared by methods presented in examples 1 - 7 were used as counterfeit protecting elements.

Example of one diffractive structure which can be prepared is given in Fig. 3 (including processing) and an example of one possible multilayer hologram is presented in Fig. 9, where 6 stands for protecting layer which protects a high refraction index layer 2 or bearing layer 1 against environmental effect or against undesirable effect of consecutive exposure by UV light and improves resistivity of the final product, 7 stands for adhesive layer which enables either unrepeatable or repeatable anchoring of the hologram or other diffractive element on the protected article, 8 stands for fragile layer which ensures good adherence of two layers to each other and which depreciates itself during any attempt to peel off and thus causes irreversible deformation and destruction of the diffractive element, 9 stands for the anchor layer, which is usually used to improve adherence of adhesive layer 7 to high refraction index layer 2 or to the bearing layer 1. 10 stands for adhesive layer providing clutching of hologram to the carrier 11 before its own application.

Industrial exploitation

The present invention is applicable for fabrication of transparent and semitransparent diffractive elements and more particularly to a transparent and semitransparent type holograms. Besides of technical applications (e.g. record of picture or information) these products can be used in such activities of human beings as advertisement, security sector, safety technique, protection of product originality, money counterfeit protection etc.


Anspruch[de]
  1. Ein transparentes oder semitransparentes Beugungselement, insbesondere ein Hologramm, das wenigstens aus zwei Schichten, die sich im Brechungsindex unterscheiden, besteht, wobei eine erste Trägerschicht (1) aus einem transparenten Polymer oder Copolymer mit einem Brechungsindex kleiner als 1.7 besteht und auf der ersten Trägerschicht (1) eine zweite, den holographischen Effekt verstärkende Schicht (2) mit einem hohen Brechungsindex angeordnet ist, wobei die Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex aus Substanzen besteht, die auf Chalkogeniden mit einem Brechungsindex grösser als 1,7 und einer Schmelztemperatur tiefer als 900 °C basieren,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet,

    dass ein erstes diffraktives Muster in die Trägerschicht (1) und/oder in die Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex mechanisch abgeformt ist und danach wenigstens ein zweites diffraktives Muster in die auf äussere Einwirkung empfindliche Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex abgeformt ist, die aus Substanzen besteht, die auf den wenigstens eines der Elemente aus der Gruppe Schwefel, Selen, Tellur enthaltenden Chalkogeniden basieren, wobei die auf den Chalkogeniden basierenden Substanzen aus der Gruppe der binären, ternären und noch komplexeren Chalkogeniden und/oder der Chalkohalogeniden ausgewählt sind, welche zusätzlich zu Schwefel oder Selen oder Tellur als ein elektropositiveres Element einige der Elemente Cu, Ag, Au, Hg, B, AI, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, N, P, As, Sb, Bi enthalten.
  2. Ein transparentes und semitransparentes Beugungselement nach Anspruch 1,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet,

    dass die auf den Chalkogeniden basierenden Substanzen zusätzlich wenigstens ein Übergangsmetall und/oder ein Element aus der Gruppe der seltenen Erden enthalten.
  3. Ein transparentes und semitransparentes Beugungselement nach Anspruch 1 oder 2,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet,

    dass es weiter eine Schutzschicht (6) und/oder eine Klebeschicht (7) und/oder eine Trennschicht (8) und/oder eine Haftvermittlungsschicht (9) umfasst.
  4. Ein Herstellverfahren für ein transparentes und semitransparentes Beugungselement nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 3, wobei das erste diffraktive Muster in die Trägerschicht (1) mechanisch abgeformt wird und darauffolgend die Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex auf die Trägerschicht (1) aufgebracht wird,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet,

    dass das wenigstens eine zweite diffraktive Muster in die Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex abgeformt wird, wobei die Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex aus einer oder mehreren Lagen der auf den Chalkogeniden basierenden Substanzen mit verschiedener Zusammensetzung besteht, die nacheinander oder gleichzeitig aufgebracht werden.
  5. Ein Herstellverfahren für ein transparentes und semitransparentes Beugungselement nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 3,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet,

    dass die Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex zuerst auf die transparente Trägerschicht (1) aufgebracht wird und danach das erste diffraktive Muster in die Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex und/oder in die Trägerschicht (1) mechanisch abgeformt wird und dass danach das wenigstens eine zweite diffraktive Muster in die auf äussere Einwirkung empfindliche Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex abgeformt wird.
  6. Ein Herstellverfahren nach Anspruch 4 oder 5,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet,

    dass die auf die Trägerschicht (1) aufgebrachte Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex im Voraus gefärbt wird.
  7. Ein Herstellverfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 4 bis 6,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet,

    dass die Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex bei niederem Druck abgeschieden wird, z.B. durch Bedampfen im Vakuum, durch Kathodenzerstäubung (Sputtering) oder durch chemische Beschichtung aus der Gasphase (CVD-Technik).
  8. Ein Herstellverfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 4 bis 6,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet,

    dass die Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex auf die Trägerschicht (1) unter Atmosphärendruck aufgebracht wird, z.B. mittels Sprayen, mittels Malen oder mittels einem Spin Coating Verfahren.
  9. Ein Herstellverfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 4 bis 8,

    dadurch gekennzeichnet,

    dass wenigstens ein weiteres zweites diffraktives Muster in der auf den Chalkogeniden basierenden Substanzen bestehenden Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex mittels Belichtung und/oder mittels selektivem Ätzen und/oder mittels Licht und/oder Wärme induzierter Diffusion eines Metalls und/oder mittels Dotieren der Schicht (2) mit dem hohen Brechungsindex mit einem Halogen oder mit Sauerstoff durch Einwirken von Halogendämpfen oder von Sauerstoff oder durch Hydrolyse an Luft modifiziert wird.
Anspruch[en]
  1. A transparent or semitransparent diffractive element, particularly a hologram, consisting at least of two layers with different index of refraction, whereof a first bearing layer (1) is a transparent polymer or copolymer having an index of refraction lower than 1,7 and on said first bearing layer is deposited a second holographic effect enhancing high refraction index layer (2) constituted by substances based on chalcogenides with an index of refraction higher than 1,7 and a melting temperature lower than 900 °C, characterized in that a first diffractive pattern is mechanically shaped in the bearing layer (1) and/or in the high refraction index layer (2) and at least one second diffractive pattern is subsequently formed in the exposure sensitive high refraction index layer (2) constituted by substances based on chalcogenides comprising at least one of the elements from the group sulphur, selenium, tellurium, said chalcogenide based substances being selected from the group of binary, ternary and even more complex chalcogenide and/or chalcohalogenide systems, containing, in addition to S or Se or Te, as a more electropositive element some of the elements Cu, Ag, Au, Hg, B, Al, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, N, P, As, Sb, Bi.
  2. A transparent and semitransparent diffractive element according to claim 1, characterized in that the chalcogenide based substances also contain at least one transient metal and/or at least one element from the rare earth element group.
  3. A transparent and semitransparent diffractive element according to claims 1 or 2, characterized in that it also comprises a protecting layer (6) and/or an adhesive layer (7) and /or a fragile layer (8) and/or anchoring layer (9).
  4. A production process of a transparent and semitransparent diffractive element according to claims 1 to 3, in which the first diffractive pattern is mechanically shaped in said bearing layer (1) and subsequently on said bearing layer (1) the high refraction index layer (2) is deposited, characterized in that the at least one second diffractive pattern is formed in said high refraction index layer (2) comprising one or more layers of chalcogenide based substances of different composition, which are deposited subsequently or simultaneously.
  5. A production process of a transparent and semitransparent diffractive element according to claims 1 to 3, characterized in that said high refraction index layer (2) is first deposited on the transparent bearing layer (1) and then the first diffractive pattern is mechanically shaped in said high refraction index layer (2) and/or said bearing layer and after that the at least one second diffractive pattern is formed in said exposure sensitive, high refraction index layer (2).
  6. A production process according to claims 4 or 5, characterized in that the high refraction index layer (2) which is deposited on said bearing layer (1) is coloured in advance.
  7. A production process according to any from claims 4 to 6, characterized in that the high refraction index layer (2) is deposited under low pressure, e.g. by vacuum evaporation, sputtering or chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique.
  8. A production process according to any from claims 4 to 6, characterized in that the high refraction index layer (2) is deposited on the bearing layer (1) under atmospheric pressure, e.g. by spraying, painting or spin coating method.
  9. A production process according to any from claims 4 to 8, characterized in that the at least one further second diffractive pattern in the high refraction index layer (2) consisting of chalcogenide based substances is modified by exposure and/or selective etching and/or photo- and/or thermally induced metal diffusion and/or with a halogen or oxygen implantation into the high refraction index layer (2) by its interaction with halogene vapours or interaction with oxygen or through air hydrolysis.
Anspruch[fr]
  1. Elément de diffraction transparent ou semi-transparent, en particulier un hologramme, consistant en au moins deux couches d'indice de réfraction différent, dont une première couche porteuse (1) est un polymère ou copolymère transparent ayant un indice de réfraction inférieur à 1,7 et, sur la dite première couche porteuse, est déposé une deuxième couche (2) d'indice de réfraction élevé renforçant l'effet holographique constituée par des substances à base de chalcogénures ayant un indice de réfraction supérieur à 1,7 et une température de fusion inférieure à 900°C, caractérisé en ce qu'un premier motif de diffraction est formé mécaniquement dans la couche porteuse (1) et/ou dans la couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2) et au moins un deuxième motif de diffraction est ensuite formé dans la couche d'indice de réfraction élevé sensible à l'exposition (2) constituée par des substances à base de chalcogénures comprenant au moins un des éléments du groupe soufre, sélénium et tellurium, les dites substances à base de chalcogénures étant choisies dans le groupe des systèmes binaires, ternaires et même plus complexes de chalcogénures et/ou chalcohalogénures, contenant, en plus de S ou Se ou Te, comme élément plus électropositif, certains des éléments Cu, Ag, Au, Hg, B, AI, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, N, P, As, Sb, Bi.
  2. Elément de diffraction transparent et semi-transparent selon la revendication 1, caractérisé en ce que les substances à base de chalcogénures contiennent également au moins un. métal de transition et/ou au moins un élément du groupe des éléments de terres rares.
  3. Elément de diffraction transparent et semi-transparent selon les "revendications 1 ou 2, caractérisé en ce qu'il comprend également une couche de protection (6) et/ou une couche adhésive (7) et/ou une couche fragile (8) et/ou une couche d'ancrage (9).
  4. Procédé de fabrication d'un élément de diffraction transparent et semi-transparent selon les revendications 1 à 3, dans lequel le premier motif de diffraction est formé mécaniquement dans la dite couche porteuse (1), et la couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2) est ensuite déposée sur la dite couche porteuse (1), caractérisé en ce que le dit au moins un deuxième motif de diffraction est formé dans la dite couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2) comprenant une ou plusieurs couches de substances à base de chalcogénures de composition différente, qui sont déposées successivement ou simultanément.
  5. Procédé de fabrication d'un élément de diffraction transparent et semi-transparent selon les revendications 1 à 3, caractérisé en ce que la dite couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2) est d'abord déposée sur la couche porteuse transparente (1) et ensuite on forme mécaniquement le premier motif de diffraction dans la dite couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2) et/ou la dite couche porteuse et on forme le dit au moins un deuxième motif de diffraction dans la dite couche d'indice de réfraction élevé sensible à l'exposition (2).
  6. Procédé de fabrication selon les revendications 4 ou 5, caractérisé en ce que la couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2), qui est déposée sur la dite couche porteuse (1), est préalablement colorée.
  7. Procédé de fabrication selon une quelconque des revendications 4 à 6, caractérisé en ce que la couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2) est déposée sous basse pression, par exemple par une technique d'évaporation sous vide, de projection ou de dépôt chimique en phase vapeur (CVD).
  8. Procédé de fabrication selon une quelconque des revendications 4 à 6, caractérisé en ce que la couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2) est déposée sur la couche porteuse (1) à la pression atmosphérique, par exemple par une technique de revêtement par pulvérisation, peinture ou rotation rapide.
  9. Procédé de fabrication selon une quelconque des revendications 4 à 8, caractérisé en ce que le dit au moins un deuxième motif de diffraction dans la couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2), constituée de substances à base de chalcogénures, est modifié par exposition et/ou attaque sélective et/ou diffusion de métal photo-et/ou thermiquement induite et/ou implantation d'un halogène ou d'oxygène dans la couche d'indice de réfraction élevé (2) par son interaction avec des vapeurs d'halogène ou son interaction avec de l'oxygène ou par hydrolyse de l'air.






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