PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP0820140 06.11.2003
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0820140
Titel Einphasiger Permanentmagnetmotor
Anmelder General Electric Co., Schenectady, N.Y., US
Erfinder Archer, William Roy, Fort Wayne, Indiana 46815, US;
Beifus, Brian Lee, Fort Wayne, Indiana 46845, US;
Becerra, Roger Carlos, Fort Wayne, Indiana 46835, US;
Brattoli, Mark Aloysius, Fort Wayne, Indiana 46815, US;
Erdman, David Marvin, Fort Wayne, Indiana 46825, US;
Benedict, Eric Roger, Madison, Wisconsin 53704, US;
Jahns, Thomas Merlin, Schenectady, New York 12309, US;
Degner, Michael W., Madison, Wisconsin 53703, US;
Kliman, Burt, Gerald, Schenectady, New York 12309, US;
Soong, Wen Liang, Schenectady, New York 12305, US;
Stephens, Charles Michael, Pattersonville, New York 12137, US
Vertreter Voigt, R., Dipl.-Ing., Pat.-Anw., 65239 Hochheim
DE-Aktenzeichen 69725231
Vertragsstaaten DE, DK, ES, FR, GB
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 15.07.1997
EP-Aktenzeichen 973052319
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 21.01.1998
EP date of grant 01.10.2003
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 06.11.2003
IPC-Hauptklasse H02K 29/12
IPC-Nebenklasse H02P 6/16   H02P 6/22   

Beschreibung[en]

This invention relates to single phase permanent magnet motors, and in particular to the sensing of rotor position in such a motor.

Conventional hermetic refrigerator compressors typically use fixed speed single phase induction motors. Variable speed operation of motors is advantageous for improving efficiency. Conventional three phase permanent magnet (PM) motors, such as those being used for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning applications, are capable of variable speed operation but are more expensive than single phase PM motors which require fewer power semiconductor switches and associated gate drivers.

Refrigeration compressors which are hermetically sealed to prevent refrigerant leakage have several requirements of their motor drives. Most such compressors are designed to operate with a preferred direction of rotation due to the passive lubrication system which usually operates correctly in only one direction. Furthermore, a three-pin connector has been adopted as an industry standard for such compressors, so it is advantageous to have a maximum of three wires between the motor inside the compressor and its controller situated outside the compressor. The motor additionally should have long term reliability under high temperature operation (typically 65 °C ambient) and be capable of maintaining output torque and efficiency at rated speed by maintaining the current in phase with the motor back electromotive force (EMF) by appropriately phase-advancing the commutation signal.

Single phase PM motors require a suitable current commutation signal synchronized with the rotor position for proper operation. In most single phase applications, a Hall-effect position sensor is typically used to detect the rotor position and thereby control the motor. Such single phase motors having a Hall-effect sensor, however, generally require a total of five wires: two motor leads and three leads for the Hall-effect sensor (two too many for the standard sealing connector). Furthermore, the reliability of such sensors in the compressor environment is uncertain.

In order to avoid the use of a Hall sensor or other rotor position sensor, various sensorless control schemes have been developed for PM motors. In three phase PM motors under normal operation, there are times when one phase is open-circuited and has no current flowing in it. Under such conditions, the terminal voltage is equal to the back EMF voltage and can thus be sensed directly. Single phase motors, however, do not have natural intervals where the phase current remains zero for any length of time, and this approach is therefore not applicable.

For three phase motors, even if the phase current is non-zero, the back EMF voltage can be calculated by modeling the motor as a resistance, inductance, and back EMF voltage source, as described by M. Jufer, "Back-EMF Indirect Detection for Self-Commutation of Synchronous Motors," European Power Electronics Conference, 1987, pp. 1125-29. This technique can also be applied to single phase PM motors and has the advantage of not requiring any extra sensing leads. However, for single phase PM motors, it is difficult to provide a controllable preferred direction of rotation. Thus, the motor can start in either direction, depending on the initial rotor angular position. Fan and compressor drives generally are designed to operate in only one direction of rotation, so control over the rotation direction is critical. Furthermore, the required knowledge of the motor parameters is not always available and is subject to production and operating variations.

DE2339260 shows a known single phase permanent magnet motor comprising a rotor, a stator including stator teeth having each one notch and a quadrature axis winding positioned for generating an output signal representative of rotor angular position and positioned out-of-phase from a main winding of the stator, the quadrature axis winding comprising a coil situated in respective notch in the two stator teeth.

The object of the invention is to provide a single phase permanent magnet motor having a quadrature axis winding situated in notches where the amplitude of the output signal is amplified.

According to the invention, there is provided a single phase permanent magnet motor comprising:

  • a rotor;
  • a stator including stator teeth, at least two of the stator teeth each having multiple notches; and
  • a quadrature axis winding positioned for generating an output signal representative of rotor angular position and positioned out-of-phase from a main winding of the stator, the quadrature axis winding comprising multiple coils connected in series with each of the coils situated in respective ones of the notches in the at least two of the stator teeth. The motor may also include a commutation estimator circuit responsive to the output signal for estimating zero crossings of the back EMF in the main winding and generating a commutation signal to commutate the main winding of the stator in advance of the estimated zero crossings of the back EMF by an angle &thetas; calculated by the following: &thetas; = L * ω * IPEAK / (Vs)
where w is the speed of the rotor, IPEAK is a peak current in the main winding corresponding to a desired speed and/or torque of the motor, L is the motor inductance in the main winding, and VS is the voltage across the main winding.

The invention may best by understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings,

where like numerals represent like components, in which:

  • Fig. 1 is a flattened sectional top view of a single phase permanent magnet (PM) motor having a quadrature axis winding for sensing rotor angular position.
  • Fig. 1a is a flattened side view of a quadrature axis winding having a multiple coil structure according to the invention.
  • Fig. 2 is a schematic diagram illustrating a direction of forward (preferred) rotation.
  • Fig. 3 is a graph of voltage, integrated voltage, and phase current versus time for the diagram of Fig. 2 illustrating an electrical phase lead and commutation points of the voltage on the quadrature axis winding during low speed operation.
  • Fig. 4 is a schematic diagram illustrating a direction of reverse rotation.
  • Fig. 5 is a graph of voltage, integrated voltage, and phase current versus time for the diagram of Fig. 4 illustrating an electrical phase lag and commutation points of the voltage on the quadrature axis winding during low speed operation.
  • Fig. 6 is a graph of integrated voltage and phase current versus time for the diagram of Fig. 2 illustrating an electrical phase lead and commutation points of the voltage on the quadrature axis winding during high speed operation.
  • Fig. 7 is a block diagram of one embodiment of a single phase PM motor controller of the present invention.

Fig. 1 is a flattened sectional top view of a single phase permanent magnet (PM) motor which is not an embodiment of the invention, showing main windings 20 and an additional coil for sensing position (a "quadrature axis winding" 22). Both the main and the quadrature axis windings are electromagnetically affected by magnet flux of a rotor 10. However the quadrature winding is not electromagnetically affected by magnet flux of a stator 12. This allows the quadrature winding to detect the rotor position without being affected by currents in main winding 20.

Both windings are electromagnetically affected by the magnet flux of the rotor because the direction of flux to or from the rotor due to each rotor magnet 14 (represented by flux lines 17 and 19) depends on the polarity of the rotor magnet adjacent a respective portion of a stator tooth 16. For example, arrows 19 are used to indicate portions of the stator teeth adjacent a magnet having N (north) type polarity whereas opposing directional arrows 17 are used to indicate portions of the stator teeth adjacent a magnet having S (south) type polarity. Therefore, when a tooth is situated such that different portions are adjacent different polarity magnets, the flux will vary with rotor position. Because of the physical offset between the main winding and the quadrature axis winding, the magnetic flux variation and hence the voltage waveforms in the two windings will not be in phase.

The quadrature axis winding is not electromagnetically affected by the flux from the main winding due to the offset between the windings and because each portion of a single tooth 16 will transmit stator flux in a common direction which is not affected by rotor position.

In fig. 1, stator 12 has teeth 16 each having three notches 18, and quadrature axis winding 22 is wound between the center notches of two teeth and is therefore about ninety electrical degrees out-of-phase with main winding 20 of the stator. The quadrature axis winding according to the invention has multiple coils in series (shown in Fig. la) used to increase the magnitude of the induced quadrature axis winding voltage.

Fig. 1a is a flattened side view of a quadrature axis winding having a multiple coil structure with leads 126. For example, stator teeth 16 each having three notches 18 are shown with the quadrature axis winding being wound in three coil sections 120, 122, and 124 through the teeth with the wound sections coupled by portions 121 and 123 of the winding. The embodiment of Fig. 1a is useful because the number of winding turns can be increased over a motor wherein only one coil section is present and therefore the magnitude of the output signal of the quadrature axis winding can be amplified.

Fig. 2 is a schematic diagram illustrating a direction of forward (preferred) rotor rotation, and Fig. 3 is a graph of the main winding back EMF voltage (Ve), the quadrature winding voltage (Vq), integrated quadrature winding voltage, and phase current versus time for the diagram of Fig. 2. This graph illustrates the ninety degree electrical phase lead and commutation points of the voltage on the quadrature axis winding during low speed operation.

The quadrature axis winding voltage, which is directly proportional to rotor speed and, as discussed above, is out-of-phase with the back EMF of the main winding, as shown by Fig. 3. Preferably, the degree to which the quadrature axis winding is out-of-phase ranges from 75 to 105 degrees with an optimum value being about ninety electrical degrees. However, the invention is expected to work for any out-of-phase quadrature axis winding capable of providing rotor angular position control in the manner described below. Whether the quadrature axis winding electrical phase leads or lags depends upon the direction of rotor rotation, as discussed below.

The motor controller ideally requires a commutation signal corresponding to the zero crossings of the main winding back EMF voltage Ve. To obtain the correspondence, the quadrature axis winding is passed through an integrator (illustrated as a lead/lag filter, for example, in Fig. 9) which phase retards the signal. In one embodiment, the phase retard of the integrator is about ninety degrees. When the quadrature axis winding phase leads by about ninety degrees and the integrator phase retards the signal by about ninety degrees, the integrated signal becomes substantially in-phase with the main winding back EMF voltage, as shown in Fig. 3, and a commutation signal can be obtained by passing the integrated signal through a comparator (shown in Fig. 9) to detect the zero crossings of the quadrature axis winding voltage. Each zero crossing represents the initiation of a change in the polarity of the current in the main winding.

Integrators inherently have gains inversely proportional to their input frequencies. The voltage induced in the quadrature axis winding is directly proportional to the motor speed and thus the motor frequency. Therefore, the output signal of the integrator has an approximately constant amplitude which is independent of motor speed/frequency; in fact, the output signal of the integrator corresponds to motor flux. Due to the relatively constant signal amplitude, the zero crossings can be easily detected over a wide range of speeds. The low frequency cutoff of the integrator will determine the minimum operating speed.

Fig. 4 is a schematic diagram illustrating a direction of reverse rotation, and Fig. 5 is a graph of voltage, integrated voltage, and phase current versus time for the diagram of Fig. 4 illustrating an electrical phase lag and commutation points of the voltage on the quadrature axis winding.

If rotation of the rotor occurs in a reverse direction (a direction opposite to the preferred steady-state direction of the motor), as shown in Fig. 5, instead of leading the main winding voltage by ninety degrees, the quadrature axis winding voltage lags by ninety degrees. Therefore, when the voltage is integrated, the inherent phase retard of the integrator produces a commutation signal which is 180 degrees out of phase with the back EMF. This condition produces a braking torque, as the machine is acting as a generator, which causes the motor to slow down. Therefore, the motor has only one possible steady state (forward) direction of rotation - - a feature that is important when driving machines such as fans and compressors.

The preferred direction of rotation can be easily changed, if desired, by either inverting the commutation signal or by reversing the polarity of either quadrature axis winding 22 or main winding 20.

During motor start-up, the motor may transiently rotate in the reverse direction, depending on the initial rotor position. If the motor does begin to rotate in the reverse direction, the braking torque will occur, as discussed above, to stop any such reverse rotation. To improve the motor start-up characteristics one technique hereinafter referred to as "pre-alignment" is to apply a DC current to the main winding for a short period on the order of a fraction of a second to momentarily align the rotor and then, before commutating the current to the main winding, allow the rotor to fall back to a position in which the starting direction of the rotor is known.

Another technique hereinafter referred to as "kick-start" is to apply a DC current pulse of fixed duration ranging from tens of milliseconds to a second to get the rotor in motion and then switch to the quadrature axis winding signal for commutation. The commutation signal, which determines the polarity of the current applied to the motor, is normally obtained from the polarity of the integral of the quadrature axis signal. When starting, the quadrature coil signal is of low amplitude and is often noisy. To improve the starting characteristic, the commutation signal is forced to remain in one state for a fixed duration of tens of milliseconds to up to a second during the kick-start period. After this period the polarity of the integral of the quadrature axis voltage is used for commutation allowing normal operation. The optimum period of the kick-start pulse is determined by the motor and the load inertia and is best determined experimentally as that which gives the most reliable starting performance.

These techniques can be applied separately or in combination. Pre-alignment is designed to ensure a given rotation direction, whereas a kick-start pulse is expected to improve starting reliability. If both are to be used, pre-alignment is preferably performed before the kick-start pulse is applied.

Fig. 6 is a graph of integrated voltage and current versus time for the diagram of Fig. 2 illustrating commutation points of the voltage on the quadrature axis winding during rated speed operation. During rated speed operation, it is advantageous to phase advance, i.e., reduce the number of degrees of the phase retard, in order to maintain the main winding back EMF voltage and the phase current waveform in phase and thereby obtain maximum output power. The required phase advance for efficient operation increases from zero degrees (ninety degree phase retard) at near standstill to typically about 35° (55° phase retard) at rated speed for single phase PM motors and is a function of speed, bus voltage, and inductance.

Fig. 7 is a block diagram of one embodiment of a single phase PM motor controller (drive circuit) of the present invention which requires only two power electronic switches 40 and 42. The quadrature axis winding technique can also be applied to other single phase controller configurations such as H-bridge and bifilar configurations. The configuration shown in Fig. 7 has an advantage for compressor applications as it allows a three-wire motor connection to be more easily maintained as described below. The power electronic switches may comprise switches such as MOSFETs or IGBTs, for example.

A 120 V ac line supplies voltage for the motor through a half-bridge diode/capacitor configuration as follows. A supply lead of the ac line can be coupled to a first diode 28. A return lead of the ac line can be coupled to a node coupling a first capacitor 32, a second capacitor 34, and a resistor 36 which are each in parallel. Second capacitor 34 is coupled at an opposing end to switch 42 and also to a second diode 30 which in turn directs its output signal to first diode 28.

First diode 28 is coupled to another end of first capacitor 32 as well as to switch 40. The switches are coupled to the main winding, as well as to respective gate drives 44 and 46. Resistor 36 is coupled to another side of the main winding as well as to a hysteresis current controller 50. The main winding passes a motor current signal Im to the hysteresis current controller which in turn sends a gate drive signal to the gate drives. Gate drive 46 is coupled to the hysteresis controller through an inverter 48.

A differential voltage signal Vq from the quadrature axis winding is directed to a Quadrature Axis Position/Speed Estimator 54 which in turn sends a commutator signal comm to a commutation block 52 and an estimated speed signal ω&supand; to a proportional-integral (PI) speed controller 56. The estimated speed signal is obtained by rectifying the quadrature axis winding voltage, the mean value of which is proportional to motor speed. The PI closed loop speed controller uses the estimated speed along with a desired speed command ω* to determine the current command signal for the commutation block. The commutation block multiplies the commutation signal (which is indicative of whether the current signal should be inverted (-1) or unchanged (+1)) and the current command signal to send a commutated current command signal I* to the hysteresis current controller.

The main winding and the quadrature axis winding both require two connections, so a total of four wires from the motor would normally be required. To avoid redesigning the existing three-pin connector, one of the connections for the main winding 20 can be shared with one of the connections from the quadrature axis winding 22.

Fig. 8 is a circuit diagram illustrating a modified three-pin connection 60 which may be used in the controller embodiment of Fig. 7 for the sharing of a connection by the main winding 20 and quadrature axis winding 22 in a compressor case 58. A pseudo "Kelvin" or four-wire connection can be used to minimize the shared path 20a between a portion of the high current main winding and the low level quadrature axis winding, and hence reduce the interference.

Fig. 9 is a block diagram of an embodiment of quadrature axis winding position and speed estimator 54 of the present invention.

A differential amplifier 68 can be used to remove common-mode noise on the quadrature axis connections. The differential amplifier supplies a signal to an integrator (shown as lead/lag filter 70) which in turn supplies a phase retarded signal to zero crossing comparator 72 which provides the commutation signal. In one embodiment the lead/lag filter has characteristic frequencies of 5 Hz and 175 Hz. The differential amplifier also supplies a signal to a scaling and rectification block 74 which sends a rectified signal to a lowpass filter 76 for providing the speed estimation. In one embodiment the lowpass filter has a bandwidth of 24 Hz. The speed can alternatively be estimated based on the time interval between successive zero crossings of the phase retarded signal.

The lead/lag filter is designed to phase advance the commutation signal to maintain the current in phase with the motor back EMF for purposes of maintaining high torque per ampere and high efficiency as the rotor speed is increased. With a conventional Hall-effect sensor or back EMF sensing embodiment, phase advancing the commutation signal requires additional circuitry, such as an analog or digital phase locked loop, to track the commutation frequency and produce the required phase advance. Such additional circuitry is not required by the present invention.

Fig. 10 is a circuit diagram of a passive implementation of a first order lowpass filter which may be used for integrating in the embodiment of Fig. 9. The filter includes a resistor 62 in series with a capacitor 64. The cutoff frequency of the lowpass filter is designed to be lower than the lowest expected operating speed, for example, a speed such as 10 rpm. The expected ninety degree phase shift is obtained at rated speed, for example, at 1000 rpm.

Fig. 11 is a circuit diagram of a passive lead/lag filter which may be used in the embodiment of Fig. 9. This filter can be fabricated by adding a single resistor 66 in series with capacitor 64 or a capacitor (not shown) in parallel with resistor 62 to the embodiment of Fig. 10.

A lead/lag filter can be used to create a phase advance at higher speeds by designing the filter such that the phase retard reduces as the speed increases. The passive lead/lag filter can reduce the phase retard from ninety degrees at medium speeds to a lesser number of degrees (In one embodiment about 55 degrees) at rated speed. This corresponds to 35 degrees of phase advance at rated speed, which is desirable for efficient motor performance.

Fig. 12 is an analog circuit diagram illustrating one embodiment for designing the electronic components for the block diagram of Fig. 9.

The quadrature axis winding signal is fed to differential amplifier 68 which comprises a conventional differential amplifier circuit for removing the common-mode noise on the connections. In one embodiment, the input signals are fed through resistors 210 and 212 to the input terminals of an operational amplifier 215, a resistor 214 is coupled between a negative input terminal and an output terminal of operational amplifier 215, and a resistor 216 is coupled between a positive input terminal of operational amplifier 215 and ground.

The differential amplifier supplies a signal to an active lead/lag filter 70 which comprises a parallel combination of a capacitor 218 and a resistor 220 coupled to a negative input terminal of an operational amplifier 226, as well as a parallel combination of a capacitor 222 and a resistor 224 coupled between the negative input terminal and an output terminal of operational amplifier 226. Lead/lag filter 70 supplies a phase retarded signal to zero crossing comparator 72 which provides the commutation signal.

The differential amplifier also supplies a signal to a scaler/inverter 74a comprising a resistor 228 coupled to a negative input terminal of an operational amplifier 232 and a resistor 230 coupled between the negative input terminal and an output terminal of the operational amplifier.

The inverted signal is then supplied to a rectifier 74b. In one embodiment, rectifier 74b comprises four resistors 234, 236, 238, and 240 in parallel with one of the resistors (resistor 240) additionally in parallel with two diodes 242 and 244, one of which is coupled across a negative input terminal and an output terminal of an operational amplifier 246. Resistors 236 and 238 are further coupled to a negative input terminal of an operational amplifier 250, with a resistor 248 coupled across the negative input and output terminals of operational amplifier 250 to complete the rectifier.

The output signal of the rectifier is passed through a low pass filter 76 comprising a resistor 252 coupled to a negative input terminal of an operational amplifier 258, as well as a parallel combination of a capacitor 254 and a resistor 256 coupled between the negative input terminal and an output terminal of operational amplifier 258. The lowpass filter provides the speed estimation signal.

Referring now to an alternative embodiment, Fig. 13 shows a four-wire lead count implementation of the invention. As described below, this implementation of the invention uses zero crossing detection of the quadrature coil signal and a commutation estimation strategy embodied by a microcomputer and/or adaptive integrator. Further, the four-wire implementation is driven by an inverter bridge and performs current regulation by sensing current on a DC link.

As shown in Fig. 13, a motor 300, such as the motor described above, is for use in driving a rotatable component (not shown). The rotatable component may be an agitator and/or basket of a laundering apparatus, a fan or blower, or a compressor as described in, for example, commonly assigned U.S. Patent Nos. RE 33,655, 5,492,273, 5,418,438, 5,423,192, and 5,376,866, the entire disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, motor 300 is a single phase, electronically commutated motor. It is to be understood, however, that motor 300 may be any electronically controllable motor. Such motors may be any electronically controllable motor or dynamoelectric machine typically powered by an electronic commutating circuit. Such motors include, for example, external rotor motors (i.e., inside out motors), permanent magnet motors, single and variable speed motors, selectable speed motors having a plurality of speeds, and brushless dc motors, including electronically commutated motors, switched reluctance motors and induction motors. In addition, the motors may be multiphase motors or single phase motors and, in any case, such motors may have a single split phase winding or a multi-phase winding. Such motors may also provide one or more finite, discrete rotor speeds selected by an electrical switch or other control circuit.

A supply VS provides high voltage DC power to main winding 20 (see Fig. 16) via an inverter bridge 302 (also see Fig. 16). The inverter bridge 302, illustrated as an H-bridge in Fig. 13, includes a plurality of power switches 304, 306, 308, 310 between a positive rail 312 and a negative rail 314. For example, the power switches 304, 306, 308, 310 may be IGBT's, BJT's or MOSFET's. Inverter bridge 302 also includes a plurality of flyback diodes 316, 318, 320, 322 corresponding to switches 304, 306, 308, 310, respectively. Each flyback diode 316, 318, 320, 322 is preferably coupled in an anti-parallel relationship with each switch 304, 306, 308, 310, respectively. By selectively switching power switches 304, 306, 308, 310 to connect supply VS to winding 20, inverter bridge 302 provides power to winding 20 in at least one preselected sequence for commutating main winding 20. In this embodiment, main winding 20 is the direct or torque-producing coil of motor 300 (see Fig. 16). It is to be understood that supply VS may also provide power to operate the various other circuits in the system.

According to one embodiment of the invention, a commutation estimator circuit 324 (see Fig. 15) generates motor control signals, or commutation signals, for commutating winding 20. In a preferred embodiment, the commutation estimator circuit 324 is embodied by a microcontroller or microcomputer which executes routines for determining optimum commutation instances as a function of the desired speed and/or torque of motor 300. As such, commutation estimator circuit operates as a state machine. In response to the commutation signals, motor 300 produces a peak current that corresponds to the load torque demand. The current in winding 20 in turn produces an electromagnetic field for rotating rotor 10 of motor 300. By matching torque load with produced torque, motor 300 operates at a desired torque or speed.

The commutation signals preferably include a series of pulse width modulated cycles, wherein each cycle causes a corresponding switching event of power switches 304, 306, 308, 310. Winding 20 of motor 300 is adapted to be commutated in at least one preselected sequence and power switches 304, 306, 308, 310 selectively provide power to winding 20 in the preselected sequence. By regulating current and, thus, torque, in motor 300, the load and motor loss demand torque may be matched so that motor 300 achieves the desired speed. In the alternative, it is contemplated that a voltage regulated control strategy, rather than a current regulated strategy, may be implemented for controlling speed and/or torque of motor 300.

In a preferred embodiment, inverter bridge 302 operates from a single commutating signal which selects either switches 304 and 310 or switches 306 and 308 depending on the position of rotor 10. In this embodiment, only one of the active switches (e.g., switch 308 or 310) is involved in current regulation (pulse width modulating) at any given time. By performing pulse width modulation, inverter bridge 302 preferably provides a peak current to winding 20 that corresponds to the desired speed and/or torque of motor 300. As an example of the normal motoring operation of motor 300, a set of gate drives (not shown) enable a pair of switches, such as switches 304 and 310, in response to a commutation signal generated by commutation estimator circuit 324. Commutation estimator circuit 324 causes the pair of switches 304, 310 to be enabled wherein one of the two switches (e.g., switch 310) performs pulse width modulation while the other remains in its on state for the entire commutation interval as commanded by the commutation logic. The polarity of the motor back EMF during this time interval is counter to the supply voltage Vs such that the driving electromotive force developing current in motor 300 is the supply VS minus the back EMF. Commonly assigned U.S. Patent No. 4,757,603, for example, shows a pulse width modulation control for a motor.

Referring further to Fig. 13, commutation estimator circuit 324 receives signals via line 326 representative of the position of rotor 10 (see Fig. 8). For example, quadrature winding 23, illustrated in Fig. 1g, provides rotor position feedback. As shown in Fig. 1g, quadrature winding 23 is positioned along the center of each stator tooth 16 and wound from tooth to tooth along stator 12. Notch 18 of each tooth 16 retains winding 23 in place. Due to its position in the center of teeth 16, quadrature winding 23 provides for cancellation of flux originating from torque producing currents circulating in main winding 20. In other words, the magnetic flux of adjacent poles cancel so that the magnetic flux of stator 12 does not affect the voltage induced in quadrature winding 23. Further, since quadrature winding 23 is wound along the entire stator 12 and positioned out-of-phase from winding 20, the voltage induced in the quadrature coil is a phase-shifted signature of the voltage induced in main winding 20. The quadrature signal also accounts for all asymmetries rotor 10 may have because it is essentially an average signal for all of the stator teeth 16. The averaging effect of the quadrature coil associated with pole alignment on the motor magnets has a beneficial effect on the bidirectionality of the motor (i.e., its ability to produce the same torque in both directions) in the presence of unevenness of the magnet arcs due to manufacturing tolerances.

The magnitude of the quadrature voltage signal depends on the speed of rotor 10, the stack length of the laminations comprising stator 12, the magnet strength and length of rotor magnet 14 (see Fig. 1), and the number of poles. The shape of the quadrature signal, which is a true signature of the back EMF induced in main winding 20, is influenced by rotor skew, magnet asymmetries and lamination design. Other means including Hall sensors, slotted disks with opto interrupters, and the like may also provide rotor position feedback for motor 300 instead of or in addition to quadrature winding 23. For example, Hall sensors provide a rotor feedback signal which is typically in phase with the back EMF in main winding 20. However, as described above, Hall sensors require more connectors than quadrature winding 23 which is undesirable in certain applications. To optimize commutation of motor 300, such position feedback means typically require precise control of positioning tolerances and accurate measurements.

In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, quadrature winding 23 (see Fig. 16) comprises a multiple-turn coil. For example, quadrature winding 23 comprises a six-turn winding coil for twelve stator poles. In the case of a multiple-turn coil, the voltage induced in quadrature winding 23 is the summation of the individual voltages induced in each single turn of winding 23. By summing the individual voltages, the quadrature winding signal accommodates for differences from coil to coil in the voltages sensed in individual coils due to, for example, magnet irregularities.

As described above, the zero crossings of the back EMF in quadrature winding 23 provide information regarding the zero crossings of the back EMF in winding 20. Commutation estimator circuit 324 (see Fig. 15) preferably determines the position of rotor 10 as a function of the zero crossings of the quadrature winding signal and generates commutation signals in response thereto. Torque production in motor 300 is then determined by the product of the current and the back EMF in winding 20. In order to sustain positive torque, commutation estimator circuit 324 commutates winding 20 at an angular distance prior to the zero crossing of the back EMF wave in the direction that will oppose the voltage energizing it. With the correct angular distance, current in winding 20 reaches zero at the time that the back EMF also reaches zero.

A shunt resistor, current transformer, Hall-effect current sensor, integrated current sensor or other sensor or circuit known in the art may be used to sense the winding or motoring current of motor 300. As illustrated in Fig. 13, inverter bridge 302 includes a single resistive shunt RSHUNT in the negative rail 314. Only the motor current flows through the shunt resistor RSHUNT when power is being exchanged from supply VS to motor 300 and vice versa.

Fig. 14 illustrates exemplary waveforms of the signals processed by commutation estimator circuit 324 with respect to time. Fig. 14(a) shows the idealized voltage in quadrature winding 23 (i.e., Vq). Fig. 14(a) also shows the idealized back EMF waveform (i.e., Ve or -Ve depending on the direction of rotation) in main winding 20. Observed from quadrature winding 23, the voltage induced in the torque producing coil (i.e., main winding 20) is shown for different directions of rotation. As described above, quadrature axis winding 23 is preferably positioned approximately 90° out-of-phase from main winding 20. Thus, the phase difference between the two signals is approximately 90°. As an example, the 90° phase difference is indicated in Fig. 14(a) as the difference between a zero crossing 328 on the Vq waveform and zero crossings 330 on the ±Ve waveforms. Fig. 14(b) shows the digital representations of the quadrature and direct coil signals, referred to as Zq and ±Ze. For example, the digital representation Zq of the quadrature winding signal Vq is obtained by detecting the zero crossing of the waveform using a comparator (see Fig. 15).

Since back EMF signals are generated only when rotor 10 is moving, position information is not available when motor 300 is at standstill. Thus, in a preferred embodiment, motor 300 initially operates according to a starting algorithm. For example, inverter bridge 302 (see Fig. 16) applies current to motor winding 20 by turning on one pair of switches on opposite legs of inverter bridge 302. In the case of split capacitor topology, such as shown in Fig. 7, one switch is turned on. As a result of the current applied to winding 20, motor 300 generates torque in either direction of rotation and rotor 10 starts moving. As soon as rotor 10 moves, voltage is induced in quadrature winding 23 and the digital representation of this signal (i.e., Zq) is available for processing.

Once rotor 10 is moving, however, commutation is preferably synchronized to the quadrature signal Vq. Fig. 15 shows a block diagram of a preferred circuit for processing the quadrature winding signal Vq during start-up and running conditions. According to this embodiment of the invention, a zero crossing comparator 332 first generates the signal Zq at line 334. After rotor 10 begins moving during start-up, an integrator 336 (see Fig. 15) integrates the digital quadrature winding signal Zq and outputs a signal INT via line 338 representative of the integration. Following integration, a comparator 340 compares the integrated signal INT to a reference level VREF. As a result of the comparison, comparator 340 provides a commutation signal via line 342 for commutating motor 300. On the other hand, commutation estimator circuit 324 outputs commutation signals via line 344 to commutate winding 20 during running conditions.

A selector 346 outputs either the signal via line 342 from the integrator 336 and comparator 340 or the signal via line 344 from commutation estimator circuit 324 to commutate motor winding 20. In a preferred embodiment, the selector 346 comprises a switch responsive to the speed of rotor 10 for selecting between the commutation signal via line 342 from comparator 340 when the speed of rotor 10 is less than a threshold speed (e.g., 120 rpm) or the signal via line 344 from commutation estimator circuit 324 when the speed of rotor 10 reaches the threshold speed. In other words, after reaching the threshold speed, the start-up procedure concludes and selector 346 switches control to commutation estimator circuit 324. In the event rotor 10 has not reached the threshold starting speed, inverter bridge 302 may be force-commutated at a certain speed (e.g., 40 rpm).

As described above, commutation estimator circuit 324 may be embodied as a microcontroller. In a preferred embodiment, the microcontroller monitors the speed of rotor 10 by measuring the time interval between commutation instances. As an example, for a twelve-pole motor with 180° conduction intervals, twelve commutation instances occur for every mechanical revolution of the rotor. The number of commutations per mechanical revolution varies with the number of rotor poles. The length of the conduction interval could be less than 180° in certain applications (see Fig. 18). In this manner, the microcontroller is able to calculate the speed of motor 300 based on the time interval between commutations. In the alternative, it is to be understood that various other speed sensors or circuits may be used for detecting the speed of rotor 10.

Advantageously, the circuit of Fig. 15 provides a high level of noise immunity at low speeds where the amplitude of the quadrature signal Vq is likely to be small and subject to noise. As speed of rotor 10 increases, the amplitude of the quadrature signal Vq increases and provides well defined transitions at the zero crossings of the waveform. According to the invention, the circuit of Fig. 15 may be implemented in hardware using analog integration and a phase lock loop circuit. Alternatively, a microcontroller executes routines to perform the integration of the quadrature winding signal or to perform another starting algorithm as well as the estimation of the commutation instances. Fig. 16 illustrates a preferred motor drive circuit in schematic form which incorporates the features of the circuit of Fig. 15.

As shown in Fig. 16, a motor drive system according to the invention includes a user interface, or input and output interface I/O, which cooperates with a nonvolatile memory EE for providing system control signals to commutation estimator circuit 324, embodied as a microcontroller. In the illustrated embodiment, commutation estimator circuit 324 provides a commutation signal that includes two drive control signals, referred to as CMM1 and CMM2, via line 348 to a set of logic gates 350. The logic gates 350 output the commutation signals in the form of gate drive signals for electronically controlling a pair of upper gate drives 352, 354 and a pair of lower gate drives 356, 358. In turn, the gate drives 352, 354, 356, 358 provide enough signal conditioning to switch power switches 304, 306, 308, 310, respectively. In addition to providing voltage signals shifted from, for example, 5 volts to 15 volts for driving the power switches, gate drives 352, 354, 356, 358 also condition the signals provided from commutation estimator circuit 324 via line 348 for optimal operation of power switches 304, 306, 308, 310.

An AC to DC voltage converter 360 provides supply voltage VS (shown as +DC link and -DC link in Fig. 16) via a DC link (i.e., rails 312 and 314 of inverter bridge 302) to power switches 304, 306, 308, 310 for commutating a winding 20 of motor 300. The AC to DC voltage converter 360 also provides low voltage power (shown as low voltage sources VC and VD in Fig. 16) to operate commutation estimator circuit 324 and other circuitry of the motor drive system.

As described above, matching torque load with produced torque causes motor 300 to operate at a desired torque or speed. According to the invention, the motor drive system of Fig. 16 includes a current regulator circuit 362 for causing motor 300 to produce a peak current that matches the load torque demand as a function of a peak regulated current reference signal IREF. The current regulator circuit 362 converts the digital IREF signal to analog and compares it to the sensed current in the DC link. Then, as a function of a pulse width modulation frequency signal fPWM, current regulator circuit 362 outputs a PWM signal to the logic gates 350 which is a function of the peak regulated current. In this manner, current regulator circuit 362, in cooperation with commutation estimator circuit 324, regulates current in motor 300.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the motor drive system also includes an overcurrent detector circuit 364 for independently comparing the sensed current to a maximum current reference shown as ITRIP*. The maximum current reference is, for example, 20-50% greater than the peak regulated current level. Preferably, the maximum current reference is fixed according to the power limitations of power switches 304, 306, 308, 310 and/or motor 300. According to the invention, overcurrent detector circuit 364 compares the sensed current in the DC link to the maximum current reference and generates an overcurrent signal ITRIP when the sensed current exceeds the maximum current reference. In turn, commutation estimator circuit 324 receives the ITRIP signal and sets the state machine of the microcontroller accordingly to disable power switches 304, 306, 308, 310 and disconnect winding 20 from the supply VS.

Fig. 16 also illustrates a current zero crossing comparator circuit 366 for generating a signal Izero representative of the zero crossings of the current sensed in the DC link. A signal IZREF provides a reference for the zero current detector Izero. Preferably, its level is set slightly greater than zero.

Referring again to Fig. 14, Fig. 14(c) illustrates the integral of signal Zq (i.e., the digital representation of the quadrature coil voltage), INT, on integrator 336 via line 338. In this approach, the amplitude of Zq is independent of motor speed. Fig. 14(d) illustrates an exemplary commutation signal CMM, which is a function of the integrated signal INT, for causing commutation in motor 300. In this case, the advance angle is zero and integrator 336 provides 90° delay from the quadrature coil signal. Commutation instances 368 coincide with the zero crossings of the torque producing coil voltage, indicated at reference character 330 on the Ve and -Ve waveform, for example. This allows maximum accelerating torque at low speeds. Integrator 336, as shown in Fig. 15, is used from start-up to a threshold speed.

Further to the invention, commutation estimator circuit 324 determines preferred commutation instances for optimizing the performance of motor 300. As stated above, motor winding 20 must be energized at a proper instant of time relative to the generated back EMF to develop optimum motoring torque in motor 300. Fig. 14(d) shows commutation instances 368 which coincide with the zero crossings of the torque producing coil, or direct coil, voltage (Ze, -Ze). However, due to the inductive nature of motor 300, which is driven by a voltage source inverter such as inverter bridge 302, the motor current takes a finite time to reach a desired current level and to decay toward zero from a determined current level. Thus, motor current must be commutated in anticipation of the transition of the back EMF waveform in order for motor current to actually cross zero at the time the motor back EMF also crosses zero.

Commutation estimator circuit 324 preferably provides further optimization of motor 300 by causing the actual commutation instances to occur before motor back EMF crosses zero. By commutating motor 300 before motor back EMF crosses zero, the motor inductive current is allowed to decay while the back EMF also approaches zero. This allows the fundamental components of motor current to be in phase with the generated back EMF which maximizes torque production. In other words, motor 300 preferably achieves a unity power factor.

According to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, commutation estimator circuit 324 estimates a commutation angle in terms of the inductance of motor 300, the supply voltage VS, the commanded motor current, and the speed of rotor 10. Commutation estimator circuit 324 further tunes the estimated angle for maximum torque production by observing the zero crossings of the motor current and synchronizing the zero crossings of the current with the zero crossings of the back EMF. This approach is valid for steady state operation.

An open loop equation for determining the commutation angle according to the invention may be derived using a simplified motor voltage equation. Neglecting the winding resistance and assuming that the motor back EMF in the vicinity of a commutation instance is close to zero, the following equation is the voltage across motor winding 20: VS = L di / (dt)

Expressing the above equation in terms of a rotating speed, ω, and solving for an angular distance: VS = L di / (d&thetas;) * d&thetas; / (dt) d&thetas; = L * d&thetas; / (dt)*di / (VS) &thetas; = L * ω * IPEAK / (VS) where &thetas; is the angle it takes for the current to decay towards zero, ω is the rotor speed, IPEAK is the peak commanded current before the commutation, L is the motor inductance, and VS is the voltage across winding 20. This simplified equation for &thetas;-sets a first order approximation for the advance angle but does not require extensive computation power as the complete equation would. It is to be understood that the above equation may be modified so as to calculate an advance time interval rather than an angle because of the relationship between motor speed and angular distance.

Another way to effect an advance angle for commutating motor winding 20 is by adaptive delaying of the integrator signal INT. A variable delay circuit (not shown) following integrator 332 accommodates the start and running commutation angle requirements over the entire speed range.

Fig. 17 illustrates exemplary waveforms for motor 300 with respect to time in which the advance angle &thetas; is calculated according to the equation described above. Fig. 17(a) shows the idealized direct back EMF waveform Ve relative to the idealized quadrature back EMF waveform Vq. Fig. 17(b) shows the digital signals Zq and Ze representing the zero crossings of the quadrature and back EMF signals, respectively. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the microcomputer embodying commutation estimator circuit 324 generates the digital signal Ze by first measuring the interval between zero crossings of the quadrature winding signal. In the illustrated embodiment, quadrature winding 23 is preferably 90° out-of-phase with main winding 20 which usually conducts in 180° intervals. For this reason, the zero crossings of the motor back EMF may be calculated by dividing the interval between zero crossings of the quadrature signal by two. Fig. 17(b) indicates a quadrature signal zero crossing by reference character 372 followed by another quadrature signal zero crossing indicated by reference character 374. The microcomputer first measures the interval T between the zero crossings 372, 374 and then estimates that the next zero crossing of the motor back, indicated by reference character 376, will follow by an interval T/2.

Fig. 17(c) shows an exemplary commutation signal CMM generated by commutation estimator circuit 324. As indicated by reference characters 378 and 380, commutation preferably occurs at the angle &thetas; in anticipation of the back EMF zero crossings 382 and 376, respectively. Fig. 17(d) illustrates the motor current IM relative to the commutation and back EMF signals and Fig. 17(e) illustrates the current detected at the DC link shunt RSHUNT (see Fig. 16), i.e., Ishunt. In this instance, the current in the shunt is the current being exchanged between supply VS and motor winding 20. The intervals in which Ishunt is zero correspond to pulse width modulation off intervals when motor current IM is decaying while circulating in motor winding 20 and inverter bridge 302. When winding 20 is commutated, Ishunt has an opposite polarity (e.g., as shown at reference character 384) indicating the current flow from winding 20 to supply VS.

As shown in Fig. 17(d), beginning at reference character 386, the motor current IM starts to decay toward zero immediately following the commutation instance 378 and crosses zero at reference character 388. Likewise, beginning at reference character 390, the motor current IM starts to decay toward zero immediately following the commutation instance 380 and crosses zero at reference character 392. Advantageously, commutation estimator circuit 324 provides further tuning of the estimated angle for maximum torque production by observing the zero crossings of the motor current during steady state operation and synchronizing them with the zero crossings of the back EMF.

Comparator circuit 366 is used to detect the zero crossings of shunt current Ishunt to determine the zero crossings of the motor current IM. The waveform of Fig. 17(f) represents the output Izero of such a comparator. As described above, commutation estimator circuit 324 preferably causes commutation in motor 300 to occur so that the fundamental components of motor current are in phase with the generated back EMF to maximize torque production. By comparing the signal Izero to the estimated zero crossing signal Ze, commutation estimator circuit 324 determines the relative displacement between the back EMF and the current zero crossings. Although the commutation instance 378 does not yet provide optimum torque, as indicated by the displacement δ, the information of the relative displacement between the back EMF and the current zero crossing provided by signal Izero allows the commutation angle to be adjusted to minimize this displacement. For example, the transition of Izero shown at reference character 394, which corresponds to the current zero crossing 388, occurs before the back EMF zero crossing 382, indicating a negative displacement δ. The angular difference between the time inductive current decays to zero and the time the back EMF crosses zero must be minimized for optimal commutation. During steady state operation, commutation estimator circuit 324 observes this difference and adjusts, or fine tunes, the advance angle to minimize the displacement δ. In this instance, commutation estimator circuit 324 decreases the advance angle (e.g., &thetas;1). As a result of the adjustment, the transition of Izero shown at reference character 396, which corresponds to the current zero crossing 392, coincides with the voltage zero crossing 376. Thus, torque production in motor 300 is optimized. When angular displacement δ is greater than a minimum angle and inverter bridge 302 is enabled for 180° conduction intervals, negative torque is produced by motor 300. This negative torque reduces the motoring torque and could generate audible noise.

Alternatively, the circuit of Fig. 16, which includes a commutation signal comprised of two control signals (i.e., CMM1 and CMM2), can be commanded to operate at conduction intervals less than 180°. Motor conduction angles less than 180° reduces torque production and can be used for torque control whenever optimal operation is not required. With this scheme, an interval of zero current "dead time" is inserted after the motor current is commutated and has reached zero. The use of dead time is beneficial in preventing the generation of negative torque when rapid acceleration or deceleration is required and the estimation of the back EMF is subject to errors.

Fig. 18 illustrates exemplary waveforms for motor 300 with respect to time in which the conduction intervals are less than 180°. Fig. 18(a) shows the idealized direct back EMF waveform Ve relative to the idealized quadrature back EMF waveform Vq. Fig. 18(b) shows the digital signals Zq and Ze representing the zero crossings of the quadrature and back EMF signals, respectively. Fig. 18(c) shows a pair of exemplary control signals CMM1 and CMM2 constituting the commutation signal generated by commutation estimator circuit 324. As indicated by reference characters 398 and 400, commutation preferably occurs at the angle &thetas;1 and the angle &thetas;2 in anticipation of back EMF zero crossings 402 and 404, respectively. Fig. 18(d) illustrates the motor current IM relative to the commutation and back EMF signals and Fig. 18(e) illustrates the current detected at the DC link shunt RSHUNT (see Fig. 16), i.e., Ishunt. As shown in Figs. 18(d) and 18(e), commutating main winding for less than 180° causes a dead time in the current. The dead time is shown by, for example, an off interval 406. As shown in Fig. 18(d), beginning at reference character 408, the motor current IM starts to decay toward zero immediately following the commutation instance 398. After reaching zero, the current is off for the off interval 406 until the next commutation at reference character 410. Likewise, beginning at reference character 412, the motor current IM starts to decay toward zero immediately following the commutation instance 400. Again, after reaching zero, the current is off for the off interval 406 until the next commutation at reference character 414. Thus, as shown in Figs. 18(d) and 18(e), the current waveforms have intervals of no current due to the conduction intervals being less than 180°. Note that the motor current decays to zero and remains at zero twice every electrical cycle.


Anspruch[de]
  1. Einphasen-Permanentmagnetmotor enthaltend:
    • einen Rotor (10),
    • einen Stator (12) mit Statorzähnen (16), wobei wenigstens zwei der Statorzähne jeweils viele Kerben (18) haben und
    • eine Querachsen-Wicklung (22), die zum Generieren eines Ausgangssignals angeordnet ist, das eine Rotorwinkelstellung anzeigt, und die viele Spulen aufweist, die mit jeder der Spulen in Reihe verbunden ist, die in entsprechenden Kerben in wenigstens der zwei Statorzähne angeordnet sind.
  2. Motor nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Querachsen-Wicklung (22) in einem Bereich von 75 Grad elektrisch bis 105 Grad elektrisch ungleichphasig von der Hauptwicklung (20) des Stators (12) angeordnet ist.
  3. Motor nach Anspruch 1, wobei die Querachsen-Wicklung (22) etwa 90 Grad elektrisch ungleichphasig von der Hauptwicklung (20) des Stators (12) angeordnet ist.
  4. Motor nach Anspruch 1, 2 oder 3, ferner enthaltend:
    • einen Integrator (70), der mit der Querachsen-Wicklung (22) gekoppelt ist, für eine Phasenverzögerung des Ausgangssignals, und
    • einen Komparator (72), der mit dem Integrator (70) verbunden ist, zum Erfassen von Nulldurchgängen des phasenverzögerten Ausgangssignals, um ein erstes Kommutierungssignal zum Kommutieren der Hauptwicklung des Stators zu liefern.
  5. Motor nach Anspruch 4, ferner enthaltend:
    • eine Kommutierungs-Schätzschaltung (324), die auf das Ausgangssignal anspricht, zum Schätzen von Nulldurchgängen der gegenelektromotorischen Kraft (EMK), die durch die Hauptwicklung (20) generiert ist, und Liefern eines zweiten Kommutierungssignals, das den geschätzten Nulldurchgängen der Gegen-EMK voreilt,
    • eine Kommutierungssignal-Wählschaltung (346), die mit dem Komparator (72) und der Kommutierungs-Schätzschaltung (324) verbunden ist und auf die Drehzahl des Rotors (10) anspricht zum Wählen des ersten Kommutierungssignals zum Kommutieren der Hauptwicklung (20), wenn die Drehzahl des Rotors (10) kleiner ist als eine Schwellenwert-Drehzahl, und zum Wählen des zweiten Kommutierungssignals zum Kommutieren der Hauptwicklung (20), wenn die Drehzahl des Rotors (10) grösser ist als die Schwellenwert-Drehzahl.
  6. Motor nach Anspruch 4 oder 5, wobei der Integrator (70) ein Tiefpass-Filter oder eine Vor-/Nacheilungs-Filter aufweist.
  7. Motor nach Anspruch 4, 5 oder 6, wobei der Integrator (70) für eine Phasenverzögerung des Ausgangssignals um etwa neunzig Grad bei der Nenndrehzahl des Motors sorgen kann.
  8. Motor nach Anspruch 4, 5 oder 6, wobei der Integrator (70) für eine Phasenverzögerung des Ausgangssignals um eine Anzahl von Graden sorgen kann, die kleiner wird, wenn eine Drehzahl des Motors grösser wird.
  9. Motor nach Anspruch 4, 5 oder 6, wobei der Integrator (70) für eine Phasenverzögerung des Ausgangssignals um etwa neunzig Grad bei mittleren Drehzahlen des Motors und um eine kleinere Anzahl von Graden bei einer Nenndrehzahl des Motors sorgen kann.
  10. Motor nach Anspruch 4, ferner enthaltend:
    • einen Gleichrichter (74b), der mit der Querachsen-Wicklung (23) verbunden ist, zum Gleichrichten des Ausgangssignals und
    • ein Tiefpass-Filter (76) zum Filtern des gleichgerichteten Ausgangssignals, um ein Geschwindigkeitssignal zu liefern.
  11. Motor nach Anspruch 10, ferner enthaltend:
    • einen Drehzahlregler (324) zum Empfangen eines Drehzahlbefehls und des Geschwindigkeitssignals und zum Berechnen eines Strombefehlssignals,
    • einen Kommutatorblock (324) zum Multiplizieren des Kommutierungssignals und des Strombefehlssignals, um ein kommutiertes Strombefehlssignal zu liefern,
    • einen Hysterese-Stromregler (324) zum Empfangen des kommutiertes Strombefehlssignals von dem Kommutator und eines Statorstromsignals von dem Stator und zum Liefern eines Gate-Stromsignals,
    • zwei Gate-Treiber (352, 354, 356, 358), die jeweils mit dem Hysterese-Stromregler verbunden sind, wobei der eine der Gate-Treiber mit dem Hysterese-Stromregler über einen Invertierer verbunden ist, und
    • zwei elektronische Leistungsschalter, die jeweils mit einem entsprechenden der zweit Gate-Treiber und einer Hauptwicklung des Stators verbunden sind.
  12. Motor nach Anspruch 1, 2 oder 3, ferner eine Kommutierungsschätzschaltung (324) enthaltend, die auf das durch die Querachsenwicklung (23) erzeugte Ausgangssignal anspricht zum Abschätzen von Nulldurchgängen der gegenelektromotorischen Kraft (EMK), die von der Hauptwicklung erzeugt wird, und zum Liefern eines Kommutierungssignals, um die Hauptwicklung (20) des Stators bei einem Winkel &thetas; vor den geschätzten Nulldurchgängen der Gegen-EMK zu kommutieren, der wie folgt berechnet wird: &thetas; = L * ω * ISpitze / (VS) wobei ω die Drehzahl des Rotors ist, ISpitze ein Spitzenstrom in der Hauptwicklung ist, der der gewünschten Drehzahl und/oder Drehmoment des Motors entspricht, L die Motorinduktivität in der Hauptwicklung ist und VS die Spannung über der Hauptwicklung ist.
  13. Motor nach Anspruch 12, wobei ferner ein Nulldurchgangs-Detektor (366) zum Erfassen von Nulldurchgängen des Stroms in der Hauptwicklung vorgesehen ist und wobei die Kommutierungs-Schätzschaltung den Winkel &thetas; einstellt, um die Differenz zwischen den erfassten Nulldurchgängen des Stroms und den geschätzten Nulldurchgängen der Gegen-EMK zu minimieren, um dadurch die Drehmomenterzeugung des Motors zu optimieren.
  14. Motor nach Anspruch 12, wobei die Hauptwicklung (20) als Antwort auf das Kommutierungssignal in zwei Leitungsintervallen pro 360° Zyklus kommutiert wird, wobei der Strom in der Hauptwicklung in der einen Richtung verläuft während des einen der Leitungsintervalle pro Zyklus und in der entgegengesetzten Richtung während des anderen der Leitungsintervalle pro Zyklus und wobei jeder der Leitungsintervalle kleiner ist als 180°.
  15. Motor nach Anspruch 14, wobei das Kommutierungssignal ein Aus-Intervall zwischen aufeinander folgenden Intervallen aufweist, wobei der Strom in der Hauptwicklung (20) während des Aus-Intervalls auf Null abklingt.
Anspruch[en]
  1. A single phase permanent magnet motor comprising:
    • a rotor (10);
    • a stator (12) including stator teeth (16), at least two of the stator teeth each having multiple notches (18); and
    • a quadrature axis winding (23) positioned for generating an output signal representative of rotor angular position and positioned out-of-phase from a main winding (20) of the stator, the quadrature axis winding (23) comprising multiple coils connected in series with each of the coils situated in respective ones of the notches in the at least two of the stator teeth.
  2. The motor of claim 1, wherein the quadrature axis winding (22) is positioned in a range of 75 electrical degrees to 105 electrical degrees out-of-phase from the main winding (20) of the stator (12).
  3. The motor of claim 1, wherein the quadrature axis winding (23) is positioned about ninety electrical degrees out-of-phase from the main winding (20) of the stator (12).
  4. The motor of claim 1, 2 or 3 further comprising:
    • an integrator (70) coupled to the quadrature axis winding (23) for phase retarding the output signal; and
    • a comparator (72) coupled to the integrator (70) for detecting zero crossings of the phase retarded output signal to provide a first commutation signal for commutating the main winding of the stator.
  5. The motor of claim 4, further comprising:
    • a commutation estimator circuit (324) responsive to the output signal for estimating zero crossings of back electromotive force (EMF) generated by the main winding (20) and providing a second commutation signal in advance of the estimated zero crossings of the back EMF; and
    • a commutation signal selector circuit (346) coupled to the comparator (72) and the commutation estimator circuit (324) and responsive to the speed of the rotor (10) for selecting the first commutation signal for commutating the main winding (20) when the speed of the rotor (10) is less than a threshold speed and selecting the second commutation signal for commutating the main winding (20) when the speed of the rotor (10) is greater than or equal to the threshold speed.
  6. The motor of claim 4 or 5, wherein the integrator (70) comprises a lowpass filter or a lead/lag filter,
  7. The motor of claim 4, 5 or 6, wherein the integrator (70) is adapted to phase retard the output signal about ninety degrees at a rated speed of the motor.
  8. The motor of claim 4, 5 or 6, wherein the integrator (70) is adapted to phase retard the output signal by a number of degrees which decreases as a speed of the motor increases.
  9. The motor of claim 4, 5 or 6, wherein the integrator (70) is adapted to phase retard the output signal by about ninety degrees at moderate speeds of the motor and by a lesser number of degrees at a rated speed of the motor.
  10. The motor of claim 4, further comprising:
    • a rectifier (74b) coupled to the quadrature axis winding (23) for rectifying the output signal, and
    • a lowpass filter (76) for filtering the rectified output signal to provide a velocity signal.
  11. The motor of claim 10, further comprising:
    • a speed controller (324) for receiving a velocity command and the velocity signal and calculating a current command signal;
    • a commutator block (324) for multiplying the commutation signal and the current command signal to provide a commutated current command signal;
    • a hysteresis current controller (324) for receiving the commutated current command signal from the commutator and a stator current signal from the stator and providing a gate command signal;
    • two gate drives (352,354,356,358), each coupled to the hysteresis current controller, one of the two gate drives coupled to the hysteresis current controller through an inverter; and
    • two power electronic switches, each coupled to a respective one of the two gate drives and to a main winding of the stator.
  12. The motor of claim 1, 2 or 3, further comprising a commutation estimator (324) circuit responsive to the output signal generated by the quadrature axis winding (23) for estimating zero crossings of back electromotive force (EMF) generated by the main winding and providing a commutation signal to commutate the main winding (20) of the stator in advance of the estimated zero crossings of the back EMF by an angle 6 calculated by the following: &thetas; = L * ω * IPEAK / (VS) where ω is the speed of the rotor, IPEAK is a peak current in the main winding corresponding to a desired speed and/or torque of the motor, L is the motor inductance in the main winding, and VS is the voltage across the main winding.
  13. The motor of claim 12 further comprising a zero crossing detector (366) for detecting zero crossings of current in the main winding and wherein the commutation estimator circuit adjusts the angle &thetas; to minimize the difference between the detected zero crossings of the current and the estimated zero crossings of the back EMF thereby optimizing torque production of the motor.
  14. The motor of claim 12 wherein the main winding (20) is commutated in response to the commutation signal in two conduction intervals per 360° cycle in which the current in the main winding is in one direction during one of the conduction intervals per cycle and in the opposite direction during the other of the conduction intervals per cycle, and wherein each of said conduction intervals is less than 180°.
  15. The motor of claim 14 wherein the commutation signal includes an off interval between successive conduction intervals wherein the current in the main winding (20) decays to zero during the off interval.
Anspruch[fr]
  1. Moteur monophasé à aimants permanents, comprenant :
    • un rotor (10);
    • un stator (12) comportant des dents de stator (16), au moins deux des dents de stator ayant chacune des encoches multiples (18); et
    • un enroulement (23) d'axe en quadrature positionné pour générer un signal de sortie représentatif de la position angulaire du rotor et positionné avec un déphasage par rapport à l'enroulement principal (20) du stator, l'enroulement (23) d'axe en quadrature comprenant des bobines multiples connectées en série, chacune des bobines étant située dans des encoches respectives parmi les encoches dans les au moins deux dents de stator.
  2. Moteur selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'enroulement (22) d'axe en quadrature est positionné dans une plage allant de 75 degrés électriques à 105 degrés électriques de déphasage par rapport à l'enroulement principal (20) du stator (12).
  3. Moteur selon la revendication 1, dans lequel l'enroulement (23) d'axe en quadrature est positionné avec un déphasage d'environ quatre-vingt-dix degrés électriques par rapport à l'enroulement principal (20) du stator (12).
  4. Moteur selon la revendication 1, 2 ou 3, comprenant en outre:
    • un intégrateur (70) couplé à l'enroulement (23) d'axe en quadrature pour retarder la phase du signal de sortie; et
    • un comparateur (72) couplé à l'intégrateur (70) pour détecter les passages par zéro du signal de sortie retardé en phase pour fournir un premier signal de commutation pour commuter l'enroulement principal du stator.
  5. Moteur selon la revendication 4, comportant en outre :
    • un circuit estimateur de commutation (324) sensible au signal de sortie pour détecter les passages par zéro de la force contre-électromotrice (FCEM) générée par l'enroulement principal (20) et fournir un second signal de commutation en avance sur les passages par zéro estimés de la force contre-électromotrice; et
    • un circuit sélecteur de signal de commutation (346) couplé au comparateur (72) et au circuit estimateur de commutation (324) et sensible à la vitesse du rotor (10) pour sélectionner le premier signal de commutation pour commuter l'enroulement principal (20) quand la vitesse du rotor est inférieure à une vitesse seuil et sélectionner le second signal de commutation pour commuter l'enroulement principal (20) quand la vitesse du rotor (10) est supérieure ou égale à la vitesse seuil.
  6. Moteur selon la revendication 4 ou 5, dans lequel l'intégrateur (70) comporte un filtre passe-bas ou un filtre avance/retard.
  7. Moteur selon la revendication 4, 5 ou 6, dans lequel l'intégrateur (70) est apte à retarder en phase le signal de sortie d'environ quatre-vingt-dix degrés à une vitesse nominale du moteur.
  8. Moteur selon la revendication 4, 5 ou 6, dans lequel l'intégrateur (70) est apte à retarder en phase le signal de sortie d'un nombre de degrés qui diminue lorsqu'une vitesse du moteur augmente.
  9. Moteur selon la revendication 4, 5 ou 6, dans lequel l'intégrateur (70) est apte à retarder en phase le signal de sortie d'environ quatre-vingt-dix degrés à des vitesses modérées du moteur et d'un nombre de degrés inférieur à une vitesse nominale du moteur.
  10. Moteur selon la revendication 4, comprenant en outre :
    • un redresseur (74b) couplé à l'enroulement (23) de l'axe en quadrature pour redresser le signal de sortie, et
    • un filtre passe-bas (76) pour filtrer le signal de sortie redressé pour fournir un signal de vitesse.
  11. Moteur selon la revendication 10, comprenant en outre :
    • un régulateur de vitesse (324) destiné à recevoir une commande de vitesse et le signal de vitesse et calculer un signal de commande de courant;
    • un bloc commutateur (324) pour multiplier le signal de commutation par le signal de commande de courant pour foumir un signal de commande de courant commuté;
    • un régulateur de courant d'hystérésis (324) destiné à recevoir le signal de commande de courant commuté provenant du commutateur et un signal de courant de stator provenant du stator et fournir un signal de commande de grille;
    • deux circuits de commande de grille (352, 354, 356, 358), couplés chacun au régulateur de courant d'hystérésis, l'un des deux circuits de commande de grille étant couplé au régulateur de courant d'hystérésis par un inverseur; et
    • deux commutateurs électroniques de puissance, couplés chacun à l'un respectif des deux circuits de commande de grille et à un enroulement principal du stator.
  12. Moteur selon la revendication 1, 2 ou 3, comportant en outre un circuit estimateur de commutation (324) sensible au signal de sortie généré par l'enroulement (23) d'axe en quadrature pour estimer les passages par zéro de la force contre-électromotrice (FCEM) générée par l'enroulement principal et fournir un signal de commutation pour commuter l'enroulement principal (20) du stator en avance sur les passages par zéro estimés de la force contre-électromotrice (FCEM) d'un angle 6 calculé de la manière suivante : &thetas; = L * ω * Icrête / (VS) ω étant la vitesse du rotor, Icrête un courant de crête dans l'enroulement principal correspondant à une vitesse et/ou un couple souhaités du moteur, L l'inductance du moteur dans l'enroulement principal et VS la tension aux bornes de l'enroulement principal.
  13. Moteur selon la revendication 12, comportant un détecteur de passages par zéro (366) pour détecter les passages par zéro du courant dans l'enroulement principal et dans lequel le circuit estimateur de commutation règle l'angle &thetas; pour minimiser la différence entre les passages par zéro du courant détectés et les passages par zéro du courant estimés de la force contre-électromotrice (FCEM), optimisant ainsi la production de couple du moteur.
  14. Moteur selon la revendication 12, dans lequel l'enroulement principal (20) est commuté en réponse au signal de commutation dans deux intervalles de conduction par cycle de 360°, dans lequel le courant dans l'enroulement principal est dans un sens pendant un des intervalles de conduction et dans le sens opposé pendant l'autre intervalle de conduction par cycle, et dans lequel chacun desdits intervalles de conduction est inférieur à 180°.
  15. Moteur selon la revendication 14, dans lequel le signal de commutation comporte un intervalle de coupure entre deux intervalles de conduction successifs, dans lequel le courant dans l'enroulement principal (20) tombe à zéro pendant l'intervalle de coupure.






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