PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP0781197 22.07.2004
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0000781197
Titel MEHRSCHICHT-DRUCKKLEBEMITTEL-AUFBAU
Anmelder Avery Dennison Co., Pasadena, Calif., US
Erfinder ERCILLO, C., Jesse, Pasadena, US;
MANN, H., Roger, Pasadena, US;
JOSEPHY, Karl, Pasadena, US;
SARTOR, Luigi, Pasadena, US;
SASAKI, Yukihiko, Pasadena, US;
DE KONING, Henk, Pasadena, US;
CHANG, Eng-Pi, Pasadena, US
Vertreter Dr. Weber, Dipl.-Phys. Seiffert, Dr. Lieke, 65183 Wiesbaden
DE-Aktenzeichen 69533162
Vertragsstaaten AT, BE, CH, DE, DK, ES, FR, GB, GR, IE, IT, LI, LU, MC, NL, PT, SE
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 15.09.1995
EP-Aktenzeichen 959331133
WO-Anmeldetag 15.09.1995
PCT-Aktenzeichen PCT/US95/11704
WO-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0096008367
WO-Veröffentlichungsdatum 21.03.1996
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 02.07.1997
EP date of grant 16.06.2004
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 22.07.2004
IPC-Hauptklasse B32B 7/10
IPC-Nebenklasse C09J 7/02   

Beschreibung[en]
Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions, and more particularly, to multilayer pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions which exhibit both good adhesion and good convertibility.

Background of the Invention

A conventional pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) label construction comprises a laminate of a facestock, at least one pressure-sensitive adhesive layer, and a coated release liner. The facestock may comprise any of a variety of materials, but is typically formed from paper or plastic films. The release liner provides a backing from which the facestock and the pressure-sensitive adhesive are peeled away just prior to label application. The surface of the release liner often consists of paper coated with a release layer of silicone.

Pressure-sensitive adhesive tape and label constructions are usually manufactured as a continuous roll in various widths, and are then processed to form finished product consisting of commercially useful labels or tape rolls. Such processing, known as converting, often involves cutting all or part of the bulk laminate roll. For example, one common converting operation in label manufacture is die cutting and matrix stripping, which involves precision cutting through the facestock and adhesive layers up to but not through the release surface, thereby cutting outlines of the labels, and then pulling away the surrounding matrix to leave only the individual labels on the release liner. Other converting operations may include butt cutting, guillotining, hole punching, slitting, and printing.

The cost of converting the bulk laminate PSA construction into the finished product depends in large part on the speed in which the converting processes can be carried out. The faster the PSA construction can be converted, the lower the cost of the finished product. While most of the current narrow-web converting presses operate at speeds of less than 152 meters per minute (500 ft/min), newer modem wide-web converting presses are designed to be operated at speeds of as high as 244 meters per minute (800 ft/min) or greater, and it is desirable to manufacture PSA constructions compatible with this converting speed.

It has been discovered that all layers of the laminate have some effect on converting speed, and much work has been directed at optimizing the facestock and release surfaces for faster converting. For example, increased matrix stripping speed generally increases stripping force, which often results in matrix breaks which force press shutdown. This problem may be avoided by the use of higher strength facestocks, which convert better than low strength facestocks at a variety of converting speeds.

The adhesive layer, however, has been the greatest limiting factor with respect to the speed of converting bulk laminates into finished product. It is desirable to have an adhesive layer with good flow properties that can adhere to a wide variety of substrates. However, adhesive compositions which are formulated to have these properties do not always convert well, oftentimes sticking to the cutting dies, smearing on the matrix and label edges, and interfering with the precision cutting, or otherwise slowing down the converting process.

In addition, adhesive layers may also impact the matrix stripping operations which follow die cutting, causing breaks in the matrix if the converting press is run at too high a speed. To avoid these matrix breaks, press operators are often forced to slow the converting presses to well below the optimal operating speed.

Thus, it is desirable to provide pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions which feature adhesive layers which show good adhesion to a wide variety of substrates of varying roughness, and which are also compatible with optimal converting performance.

Summary of the Invention

The present invention is directed toward pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions which show good adhesion to a wide variety of substrates, and which also convert well.

In one aspect of the present invention, there is provided a pressure-sensitive adhesive construction with improved convertibility, characterized in that the construction comprises: a first surface; a first adhesive layer on the first surface, the first adhesive layer comprising a first adhesive composition having a first glass transition temperature, and having a tangent delta greater than 0.5 at 102 radians per second at 20°C, and a storage modulus greater than 3 x 108 dynes/cm2 at 104 radians per second at 20°C; a second adhesive layer on the first adhesive layer, the second adhesive layer comprising a second adhesive composition with a second glass transition temperature; and a second surface. The first adhesive composition may be either an acrylic based or a rubber-based adhesive and may include a first organic additive.

In this embodiment, the first layer may comprise a pressure-sensitive adhesive layer, or it may comprise an adhesive layer which does not exhibit pressure-sensitive adhesive properties.

In one preferred embodiment said first surface is a release surface and said second surface is a facestock.

In another preferred embodiment said first surface is a facestock and said second surface is a release surface.

In one embodiment, the first transition temperature is higher than the second glass transition temperature.

Preferably, the first glass transition temperature is about 10°C to about 50°C higher than the second glass transition temperature.

More preferably, the first glass transition temperature is about 15°C to about 35°C higher than the second glass transition temperature.

The second adhesive composition may be either an acrylic based or a natural or synthetic elastomeric pressure-sensitive adhesive.

The second adhesive composition may include a second organic additive.

Preferably, a tackifier is present in at least one of the first and second adhesive compositions and in a concentration by weight of about 40-90%.

Preferably a plasticizer is present in at least one of the first and second adhesive compositions and in a concentration of about 1-30% by weight.

A release liner may be on the second adhesive layer.

In another preferred embodiment, one or more additional adhesive layers are positioned between the first adhesive layer and the second adhesive layer.

Preferably, the first adhesive layer comprises a first polymeric component, and the second adhesive layer comprises a second polymeric component, and at least one of the polymeric components is a block copolymer of styrene-butadiene-styrene, styrene-isoprene-styrene, styrene-butadiene-styrene-isoprene, multibranched styrene-butadiene, or multibranched styrene isoprene.

In one particularly preferred embodiment, at least one of the first or second adhesive compositions is a blend of styrene-isoprene-styrene and styrene-butadiene block copolymers.

In one particularly preferred embodiment, at least one of the first and second adhesive layers contains an acrylic-based polymer.

If the first adhesive layer, and in some cases the second adhesive layer, is an acrylic based adhesive composition then that composition preferably comprises polymers formed from the polymerization of at least one alkyl acrylate monomer containing from about four to about twelve carbon atoms, in an amount from about 35% to about 95% by weight of the polymer or copolymer.

In one preferred embodiment, the first and second adhesive layers contain an elastomeric polymer component, and the weight ratio of the sum of elastomeric polymer component to the sum of migratory tackifiers and plasticizers in the first adhesive layer is approximately equal to the weight ratio of the sum of elastomeric polymer component to the sum of migratory tackifiers and plasticiziers in the second adhesive layer.

Preferably, the layer with a high storage modulus is in contact with the release layer.

According to another aspect of the present invention there is a provided a method of producing the pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of the invention characterized in that the method comprises: providing a first surface; applying a first pressure-sensitive adhesive layer to the first surface, wherein the first pressure-sensitive adhesive layer includes a first adhesive composition having a first glass transition temperature and having a tangent delta greater than 0.5 at 102 radians per second at 20°C, and a storage modulus greater than 3 x 108 dynes/cm2 at 104 radians per second at 20°C; applying a second pressure-sensitive adhesive layer to the first pressure-sensitive adhesive layer, wherein the second pressure-sensitive adhesive layer includes a second adhesive composition having a second glass transition temperature; and applying a second surface to the second pressure-sensitive adhesive layer.

Preferably; the second glass transition temperature is lower than the first glass transition temperature by 10°C to 50°C.

In one preferred embodiment of this aspect of the invention, the first surface is a release surface and the second surface is a facestock.

In an alternative preferred embodiment, the first surface is a facestock and the second surface is a release surface.

Preferably the first and second adhesive layers are applied substantially simultaneously by a dual die.

Brief Description of the Drawings

  • FIGURE 1 is a cross-sectional view of a conventional pressure-sensitive adhesive construction.
  • FIGURE 2 is a cross-sectional view of a pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of the present invention.
  • FIGURE 3 is a plot of the loss modulus, the storage modulus, and tangent delta of adhesive Formulation 2 in Table I as a function of temperature at 10 radians per second.
  • FIGURE 4 is a plot of the loss modulus, the storage modulus, and tangent delta of adhesive Formulation 1 in Table I as a function of temperature at 10 radians per second.
  • FIGURE 5 is a schematic diagram of a dual die used to apply the adhesive formulations of the present invention.
  • FIGURE 6 is a cross-sectional schematic view showing the lip structure of the dual die of Figure 5 as it is applying two layers of adhesive.
  • FIGURE 7 is a cross-sectional schematic showing an angled lip structure of the dual die as it is applying two layers of adhesive.
  • FIGURE 8 is a cross-sectional schematic of a dual die featuring a beveled lip structure.

Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiments

The present invention is directed to multilayer adhesive constructions showing improved convertibility as well as good adhesion and aging.

In one embodiment of the present invention, this is achieved by providing a multilayer pressure-sensitive adhesive construction as set forth in the accompanying claims which comprises two or more adhesive layers, at least one of which is a pressure-sensitive adhesive layer, and where at least one of the layers has an adhesive composition with a glass transition temperature that differs from the glass transition temperature of an adhesive composition in a different layer. In this embodiment the first layer has a storage modulus which, at a frequency of 104 radians per second at 20°C, is greater than about 3 x 108 dynes/cm2, and a tangent delta, which at 102 radians per second and 20°C, is greater than about 0.5. A second adhesive layer comprising a pressure-sensitive adhesive may be in contact with the first layer, thereby providing an adhesive layer which shows good adhesion to a wide variety of substrates. Multilayer adhesive constructions of this design exhibit good convertibility and good adhesion to a variety of substrates of varying surface roughness. In this embodiment, it is preferred that the adhesive layer nearest the facestock contains the adhesive composition with the highest glass transition temperature. The adhesive layer nearest the release layer has the adhesive composition with the lower glass transition temperature, and may be selected for its desirable adherent properties. It has been discovered that multilayer adhesive constructions of this design, which feature at least two adhesive layers with differing glass transition temperatures, show markedly improved convertibility relative to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions.

In another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the adhesive layer in contact with the facestock has a lower glass transition temperature than an adhesive layer nearer to the release surface. In this aspect of the present invention, the multiple layers of the adhesive construct can be selected and arranged to balance improved converting with desirable adherent properties.

As used herein, the term "glass transition temperature" (Tg) refers to the temperature at which an adhesive composition, which may include polymers, resins, and oils, and other ingredients, changes from a glassy to a rubbery state. For block copolymer based adhesives (SIS, SBS, SI, SB, SEBS, or other block copolymers with endblocks of polystyrene), the Tg reflects only the midblock of the elastomer components of the adhesive composition. The term "native glass transition temperature", as used herein, refers to the glass transition temperature of a particular component of the adhesive composition, such as a polymer, as that component exists in its pure form.

Referring to FIG. 1, for comparison purposes, there is depicted a conventional pressure-sensitive adhesive construction. Construction 10 features a facestock 12, a pressure-sensitive adhesive layer 14 of uniform composition in contact with the facestock 12, and a release layer 16, having a release surface thereon, in contact with the pressure-sensitive adhesive layer 14.

Although the present invention will be described in the context of a construction having a release layer, the present invention is equally applicable in the context of a construction such as for the production of tape in which the release layer is omitted and a release surface is provided on the opposite side of the facestock from the adhesive. It is contemplated that tape constructions may benefit from the advantages of the present invention during various converting operations involving cutting of the bulk tape roll, such as slitting.

In addition, although the present invention may be described in the context of having two pressure-sensitive adhesive layers, it is equally applicable to a multilayer adhesive construction where only the adhesive layer nearest the release layer is a pressure-sensitive adhesive, and wherein the other layers may or may not be an inherently tacky adhesive layer, as described more fully below. Thus, the term "adhesive layer," and "adhesive composition," as used herein, are meant only to refer to layers, or the adhesive compositions in those layers, with at least that minimal degree of tack required to adhere to a particular facestock substrate of an adhesive construction. An "adhesive layer" or "adhesive composition" may include, but does not necessarily include, "pressure-sensitive adhesive layers" or "pressure-sensitive adhesives," which possess substantially greater tack than that minimal degree of tack needed to adhere to the facestock, and which adhere well to a variety of substrates on contact.

Referring to FIG. 2, there is depicted one embodiment of the multilayer pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of the present invention which features two pressure-sensitive adhesive layers. Multilayer pressure-sensitive adhesive construction 20 is comprised of a facestock 22, a first pressure-sensitive adhesive layer 24 in contact with the facestock 22, a second pressure-sensitive adhesive layer 26 in contact with the first pressure-sensitive adhesive layer 24, and a release layer 28 in contact with the second pressure-sensitive adhesive layer 26. Pressure-sensitive adhesive layers 24 and 26 each have one or more polymerized components, as well as other components discussed below, which combine to form an adhesive composition with at least one glass transition temperature. The glass transition temperatures of the adhesive compositions of the respective adhesive layers differs.

As can be readily seen from comparison of FIGS. 1 and 2, pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions of the present invention differ from conventional pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions, in addition to ways described more fully below, by having two layers 24 and 26. In one embodiment, described above, layers 24 and 26 are both formed of inherently tacky pressure-sensitive adhesive compositions, and thus comprise pressure-sensitive adhesive layers. In an alternate embodiment, described in more detail below, layer 24 is formed of a polymeric composition which is not inherently tacky, and does not exhibit pressure-sensitive adhesive properties, thereby forming an adhesive layer 26 which is not a pressure-sensitive adhesive layer.

In addition, although not depicted, it is contemplated that the teachings of the present invention are applicable to create multilayer pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions which feature three or more layers, where one or more layers may comprise a pressure-sensitive adhesive, and which show the improved convertibility and aging of constructions of the present invention.

In all embodiments of the present invention, layers 24 and 26 are comprised of polymeric compositions. Various other organic and inorganic substances may be added to the polymeric compositions as may be desired to alter the properties of the layers. For example, additives may be selected to enhance the adhesive properties of a particular layer, as described more fully below.

The polymeric components of layers 24 and 26 may consist of any of a variety of polymers which are known to be useful in the formation of adhesive compositions, such as natural or synthetic elastomers, or acrylic based adhesive compositions. For example, adhesive layers 24 and 26 may both consist of compositions including elastomeric polymers, or they may both consist of compositions including acrylic polymers. Alternately, either layer 24 or 26 may consist of a composition including an elastomeric polymer, with the other layer being a composition including an acrylic polymer. Layers 24 and 26 may be formed with identical polymer components or different polymer components.

In addition, although layer 26 should comprise a pressure-sensitive adhesive, and thus should be formed from an adhesive composition which imparts pressure sensitive properties, layer 24 may or may not be formed of a pressure-sensitive adhesive composition. In the preferred embodiment, layer 24 only need possess sufficient tack to adhere to facestock 22 when laminated at room temperature or elevated temperature. However, as can be appreciated by one of skill in the art, the polymeric compositions in layers 24 and 26 must be sufficiently compatible to adhere to one another strongly enough to prevent separation of layers 24 and 26 when the facestock 22 and layers 24 and 26 are removed from the release layer 28, as for example, when a label construction is peeled from its backing.

In one embodiment, either layer 24 or 26, or both layers 24 and 26, may be formed from an acrylic based polymer. It is contemplated that any acrylic based polymer capable of forming an adhesive layer with sufficient tack to adhere to the facestock 22 may function in the present invention. In addition, with respect to layer 24, and layer 26 in certain embodiments, presently preferred acrylic polymers for the pressure-sensitive adhesive layers include those formed from polymerization of at least one alkyl acrylate monomer containing from about 4 to about 12 carbon atoms in the alkyl group, and present in an amount from about 35-95 % by weight of the polymer or copolymer, as disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 5,264,532 issued to Bernard. Optionally, the acrylic based pressure-sensitive adhesive might be formed from a single polymeric species.

Advantageously, the glass transition temperature of an adhesive layer comprising acrylic polymers can be varied by adjusting the amount of polar, or "hard monomers," in the copolymer, as taught by U.S. Patent No. 5,264,532, incorporated herein by reference. The greater the percentage by weight of hard monomers in an acrylic copolymer, the higher the glass transition temperature. Hard monomers contemplated useful for the present invention include vinyl esters, carboxylic acids, and methacrylates, in concentrations by weight ranging from about zero to about thirty-five percent by weight of the polymer.

In another embodiment, layers 24 and 26 each include at least one unsaturated elastomeric polymer. The elastomeric polymers used are preferably based on di-block and tri-block copolymers of styrene/butadiene and styrene/isoprene. For example, styrene-butadiene-styrene, styrene-isoprene-styrene, styrene-butadiene, and styrene-isoprene block copolymers, such as the Kraton polymers manufactured and sold by Shell Chemical Company, of Houston, Texas and the Solprene polymers manufactured and sold by Housemex, Inc., located in Houston, Texas, are suitable for use in the instant invention. Multibranched styrene-butadiene and multibranched styrene-isoprene, of the formula (SB)x and (SI)x, respectively, where x is greater than 2, may also be used.

Co-blends of Kraton RP 6419, a styrene-isoprene-styrene block copolymer, and Solprene 1205, a styrene-butadiene block copolymer, have proven to be particularly suited for the polymeric compositions of the respective layers. When a co-blended elastomeric polymer composition is used, more than one glass transition temperature may be observed, as taught by U.S. Patent No. 5,290,842, issued to Sasaki, et al., incorporated herein by reference. In such a case the temperature corresponding to the major peak, as observed on a plot of tangent delta as a function of temperature, is the important glass transition temperature for purposes of the present invention.

The polymeric compositions of the respective layers 24 and 26 may both function as pressure-sensitive adhesives, although this is not required for those layers not in contact with the release layer. However, unsaturated elastomeric polymers normally do not function as pressure-sensitive adhesives by themselves. Pressure sensitive properties are imparted to compositions containing unsaturated elastomeric polymers by the addition of other organic molecules known as tackifiers. Tackifiers are generally hydrocarbon molecules, wood resins, pall resins, and the like, which when present in concentrations ranging from about 40% to about 90% by weight of the total adhesive composition, more preferably from about 45% to about 85% by weight, impart pressure-sensitive adhesive characteristics to the elastomeric polymer adhesive formulation. Compositions containing less than about 40% by weight of tackifier additive do not generally show sufficient "quickstick," or initial adhesion, to function as a pressure-sensitive adhesive, and therefore are not inherently tacky. Compositions with too high a concentration of tackifying additive, on the other hand, generally show too little cohesive strength to work properly in most intended use applications of constructions made in accordance with the instant invention.

Tackifier additives are well known in the art, and may be used to increase the glass transition temperature of the unsaturated elastomeric polymer adhesive composition, in proportion to increasing weight concentration of the tackifier. Thus, in addition to their ability to impart pressure-sensitive adhesive properties to the compositions of the instant invention, tackifiers may also be selected to optimize the difference of the glass transition temperatures between the adhesive compositions in different layers. For example, with reference to FIG. 2, the glass transition temperature of the adhesive composition in adhesive layer 24 could be increased by increasing the concentration by weight of a tackifying additive in layer 24. Similarly, the glass transition temperature of the adhesive composition in adhesive layer 26 could be decreased by decreasing the concentration by weight of tackifying additive in layer 26.

Tackifier additives useful for practicing the present invention are those which impart pressure-sensitive adhesive properties to the elastomeric polymer compositions, and which also serve to increase the glass transition temperature of the adhesive compositions. It is contemplated that any tackifier known by those of skill in the art to be compatible with elastomeric polymer compositions may be used with the present embodiment of the invention. One such tackifier, found useful for the Solprene 1205/Kraton RP 6419 blends discussed previously, is Wingtak 10, a synthetic polyterpene resin which is liquid at room temperature, and sold by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company of Akron, Ohio. Other suitable tackifying additives may include Escorez 1310 and Escorez 2596, both manufactured by Exxon of Irving, Texas. Of course, as can be appreciated by those of skill in the art, a variety of different tackifying additives may be used to practice the present invention.

In contrast to tackifiers, plasticizers are organic molecules, which form liquids at room temperature, and which are known to decrease the glass transition temperature of an adhesive composition containing elastomeric polymers. Thus, plasticizers may be used in the instant invention, alone or in combination with tackifiers, to alter the glass transition temperature of a particular adhesive composition in one of the adhesive layers. One plasticizer found useful for practicing the present invention is Shellflex 371, a naphthenic processing oil available from Shell Oil Company of Houston, Texas. However, any plasticizer known by those of skill in the art to be compatible with elastomeric polymer compositions may be used to practice the present invention.

Many liquid tackifiers or plasticizers which might be used with elastomeric polymers are composed of small organic molecules which are capable of migrating between adjacent adhesive layers. Migration is especially likely to occur if the liquid concentration of tackifiers and plasticizers in one elastomeric polymer adhesive layer greatly exceeds that present in an adjacent elastomeric polymer adhesive layer. Migration of these species is undesirable, as it leads to loss of adhesion over time, otherwise known as poor "aging" of the adhesive layer. To minimize the chances for migration to occur, it is preferred that the weight ratio of the sum of elastomeric polymer to the sum of liquid tackifiers and plasticizers in a particular layer, defined herein as the "polymer to liquid tackifier and plasticizer ratio," be roughly equal between adjacent layers.

In addition to tackifiers and plasticizers, other additives may be used in the adhesive compositions to impart desired properties. For example, anti-oxidants may be used to protect the polymers from oxidative degradation. Suitable anti-oxidants useful in practicing the present invention include Irgafos 168 and Irganox 565, available from Ciba-Geigy, located in Hawthorne, New York.

Various cutting agents, such as waxes and surfactants, as taught by U.S. Patent No. 5,322,876, issued to Sasaki, may also be added to the adhesive compositions of the present invention. For example, Pluronic F108, a block copolymer surfactant having polyethylene-oxide and polypropylene-oxide blocks, and manufactured by BASF, has been found useful in practicing the present invention. Polyethylene glycol waxes, such as Carbowax 1450 manufactured by Union Carbide, located in Danbury, Connecticut, may also be used.

Filler components such as Camel Wite, which consists of calcium carbonate, and is available from Genstar Stone Products Co., located in Hunt Valley, Missouri, may also be used in the adhesive compositions of the present invention.

Representative formulations of adhesive compositions useful in practicing the present invention are set forth in Table I. All values listed are parts by weight. Raw Materials Formulation (ppw ) F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8 F9 Kraton RP 6419 20 13 Kraton 1112 13 Kraton 1107 23.2 13 16.5 20 23.5 27 Solprene 1205 10 7 10 7 7 8.5 10 11.5 13.0 Escorez 2596 46 64 43.3 64 64 55 46 37 28 Wingtack 10 12 8 23.5 8 8 10 12 14 16 Shellflex 371 12 8 8 8 10 12 14 16 Camel Wite 8.5 8.5 3 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 Irgafos 168 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 Irganox 565 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 Pluronic F108 3 Carbowax 1450 3

Referring to FIG. 2, it is important to the functioning of the present invention that the glass transition temperatures of the adhesive compositions in adhesive layers 24 and 26 differ. Preferably, the glass transition temperatures should differ by about ten to about fifty degrees Celsius. More preferably, the glass transition temperatures should differ by about ten to about thirty degrees Celsius. In a most preferred embodiment, the glass transition temperatures differ by about fifteen to about twenty-five degrees Celsius.

In one preferred embodiment, the adhesive layer containing the adhesive composition with the higher glass transition temperature is in contact with the facestock 22, and the adhesive composition with the lower glass transition temperature is in contact with the release layer 28. It has been discovered that pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions embodying this design show improved converting properties, as will be discussed below. However, it should be appreciated by those of skill in the art that some improved converting embodiments of the present invention may feature the adhesive composition nearest the release layer 28 having a higher glass transition temperature than the layer nearest the facestock 22.

For purposes of the present invention, it is the difference between the glass transition temperatures of the adhesive compositions in the adhesive layers that appears to reflect one characteristic important to the functioning of the present invention. In an optimal embodiment of the present invention, the difference in the glass transition temperature between the two layers is such that the layer in contact with the facestock has at least a sufficient amount of tack to adhere to the facestock, while the adhesive layer nearest the release layer is inherently tacky. The degree of tack possessed by a particular adhesive layer is dependent in large part on the glass transition temperature of the adhesive composition of that layer. If the glass transition temperature is too high, the composition will fail to function as an adhesive. In contrast, if the glass transition temperature is too low, the adhesive composition may flow too readily, which diminishes converting performance. Various components of the adhesive composition have native glass transition temperatures, which contribute to the observed glass transition temperature of the adhesive composition as a whole. These components include the polymers, tackifiers, plasticizers, fillers, and various other additives known to those of skill in the art.

In addition, if a particular adhesive is to function as a pressure-sensitive adhesive, as is required for the adhesive layer nearest the release surface, the adhesive composition should have a glass transition temperature of at least about 5 degrees to about 70 degrees Celsius below the contemplated use application temperature, more preferably from about 10 degrees to about 50 degrees below the contemplated use application temperature.

Another important characteristic to the functioning of the present invention is the storage modulus (G'), which is a measure of the energy stored and recovered per cycle of sinusoidal deformation, when different systems are compared at the same strain amplitude and rate. Adhesive compositions with a sufficiently high storage modulus for a given amount of force exhibit less deformation, and are therefore less likely to adhere to cutting blades or dies used in the converting process. In one embodiment of the present invention, it is preferred that the layer with the higher storage modulus be in contact with the facestock 22. The layer with the lower storage modulus is in contact with the release layer 28. In this embodiment it is preferred that the layer in contact with the facestock have a storage modulus, at 104 radians per second and 20°C, within the range of from about 1x108 dynes/cm2 to about 5x109 dynes/cm2, more preferably in the range from about 3x108 dynes/cm2 to about 1x109 dynes/cm2, and most preferably within the range from about 3x108 dynes/cm2 to about 8x108 dynes/cm2.

The glass transition temperature and storage modulus of adhesive compositions used in the present invention can be determined by various methods known to those of skill in the art. Because of the viscoelastic nature of the adhesive compositions, the Tg value will be dependent on the type and rate of these methods. One such method is to plot the tangent delta, which is the ratio of the loss modulus (G") to the storage modulus (G'), as a function of temperature. The temperature at which the tangent delta peak occurs at a given frequency (e.g., 10 radians per second), represents the glass transition temperature. The loss modulus (G") is a measure of the energy dissipated or lost as heat or sound per cycle of sinusoidal deformation, when different systems are compared at the same strain amplitude and rate. In addition, for pressure-sensitive adhesives, loss modulus can be correlated to the amount of energy dissipated in peeling the viscoelastic polymeric material from a substrate.

Tangent delta (tan δ), storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G") are measured by placing an approximately 1.5-2 mm thick sample of an adhesive composition between two 8 mm parallel plates of a Rheometrics instrument (model RMS-800 manufactured and sold by Rheometrics, Inc., Piscataway, New Jersey), and oscillating the plates relative to one another at 10 radians per second. The parallel plates are heated at a rate of about 1°C per minute during the test. Measurements of the storage modulus, loss modulus, and tangent delta are made at 3°C intervals. In addition, the loss modulus, storage modulus and tan delta may be measured using a similar protocol at different frequencies, as is known by those of skill in the art.

FIG. 3 is a plot of tangent delta as a function of temperature for Formulation 2 as disclosed in Table I. The glass transition temperature corresponds to the temperature at which the tangent delta peak occurs at 10 radians per second, and is approximately 34 degrees Celsius.

FIG. 4 is a plot of the tangent delta as a function of temperature for Formulation 1 as disclosed in Table I. The glass transition temperature for this composition correspond to the temperature at which the tangent delta peak occurs at 10 radians per second, and is about 10.7 degrees Celsius.

The glass transition temperatures of Formulations 1, 2, and 5-9 of Table I, as well as the storage modulus and tangent delta at 20°C and at various frequencies, as determined using the Rheometrics instrument as discussed above, are set forth below in Table II.

Facestock 22, as depicted in FIG. 2, may comprise any of a variety of materials known by those of skill in the art to be suitable as a facestock material. For example, facestock 22 may be composed of such materials as paper, polyester, or other polymeric materials suitable for facestock use such as polyethylene or polypropylene. The only requirement for facestock 22 is that it be capable of forming some degree of adhesive bond to adhesive layer 24, preferably by having layer 24 adhere to the material selected as the facestock.

Similarly, release layer 28 may consist of any of a variety of materials known to those of skill in the art. In one preferred embodiment, useful for label manufacture, release layer 28 comprises a silicone coated paper substance.

The thickness of the adhesive layers 24 and 26 is typically characterized in terms of the number of grams of adhesive composition applied per meter squared of the surface it is applied on. Generally, a coating weight of about 25 g/m2 is roughly equal to a thickness of about 25µm, although this may vary considerably depending on the density and type of adhesive used.

The present invention will work when the individual coat weight in each of adhesive layer 24 and 26 is enough to form a discrete identifiable layer. The total coat weight, defined as the sum of the coat weights of adhesive layers 24 and 26, may vary from 15 g/m2 to 125 g/m2.

In single layer adhesive constructions using a rubber-based adhesive layer, it has been discovered that convertability decreases in proportion to increasing coat weight of the adhesive layer. In these rubber-based systems, convertability decreases dramatically when the adhesive layer is coated at a weight of greater than 25 g/m2. Therefore, in the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the sum of the two coat weights of adhesive layers 24 and 26 ranges from about 15 g/m2 to less than about 30 g/m2, more preferably to less than about 25 g/m2, and most preferably to about 20 g/m2.

Within the most preferred total coat weight of about 20 g/m2, the respective coat weights of individual adhesive layers 24 and 26 may vary considerably. For example, the adhesive layer 24 nearest the facestock may have a coat weight range of from about 5 g/m2 to about 15 g/m2. Similarly, the adhesive layer 26 furthest from the facestock may also have a coat weight range of from about 5 g/m2 to about 15 g/m2. Set forth in Table III are Examples 1-23, which utilize the adhesive Formulations disclosed in Table I, and demonstrate a variety of coat weight ranges that the individual layers might comprise in nonlimiting exemplary embodiments of the present invention. As used in Table III, "Upper Adhesive Layer" refers to the layer nearest the facestock and "Lower Adhesive Layer" refers to the layer nearest the release liner.

Set forth in Table IV are adhesive data for Examples 1-23 of Table III. Looptack was determined by forming an 0.2m (8 inch) loop of a 0.03m (1 inch) wide sample, mounting the loop in the jaws of an Instron tester, and then moving the loop against a test surface at 0.3m per minute (12"/min), and after a 0.03m x 0.08m (1" x 3") area was covered, removing the loop at 0.3m per minute (12"/min). The force recorded was reported as looptack. Table IVa discloses looptack data for the selected constructions of Table III at low temperatures on high density polyethylene (HDPE).

This data demonstrates that multilayer constructions of nonlimiting exemplary embodiments of the present invention show good adhesion to a variety of substrates, and also show good adhesion at low temperature. In addition, although not shown, it has also been discovered that similar multilayer adhesive constructions do not lose significant adhesive strength on aging at room temperature for up to three months. Facestock Upper Adhesive Layer Upper Layer Coat Weight Lower Adhesive Layer Lower Layer Coat Weight Release Layer Example 1 HG F1 15 g/m2 F2 5 g/m2 BG Example 2 HG F2 5 g/m2 F1 15 g/m2 BG Example 3 HG F2 10 g/m2 F1 10 g/m2 BG Example 4 HG F2 15 g/m2 F1 5 g/m2 BG Example 5 HG F1 20 g/m2 -- -- BG Example 6 HG F2 20 g/m2 -- -- BG Example 7 Polyester F2 5 g/m2 F1 15 g/m2 BG Example 8 Polyester F2 10 g/m2 F1 10 g/m2 BG Example 9 Polyester F2 15 g/m2 F1 5 g/m2 BG Example 10 Polyester F1 20 g/m2 -- -- BG Example 11 HG F5 10 F6 10 BG Example 12 HG F5 10 F7 10 BG Example 13 HG F4 10 F8 10 BG Example 14 HG F4 10 F9 10 BG Example 15 HG F6 10 F6 10 BG Example 16 HG F6 10 F7 10 BG Example 17 HG F6 10 F8 10 BG Example 18 HG F7 10 F7 10 BG Example 19 HG F7 10 F8 10 BG Example 20 HG F5 20 F7 0 BG Example 21 HG F5 15 F7 5 BG Example 22 HG F5 5 F7 15 BG Example 23 HG F5 0 F7 20 BG
HG = High Gloss white paper F1 = Formulation 1 from Table I F2 = Formulation 2 from Table I BG = Silicon coated 18kg backing paper Polyester facestocks used were composed of MYLAR, manufactured by DuPont Chemical Co. of Wilmington, Delaware Stainless Steel Cardboard High Density Polyethylene Adhesive Const. from Table III Average Initial Looptack N/m Average Initial Looptack N/m Average Initial Looptack N/m Ex. 1 1090 (±110) 177 (±59) 760 (±200) Ex. 2 730 (±120) 224 (±50) 587 (±40) Ex. 3 800 (±200) 152 (±44) 585 (±37) Ex. 4 690 (±150) 75 (±9) 450 (±110) Ex. 5 650 (±46) 147 (±35) 420 (±120) Ex. 6 168 (±43) 1.8 (±16) 111 (±32) Ex. 7 720 (±68) 265 (±68) 330 (±170) Ex. 8 776 (±26) 182 (±32) 301 (±78) Ex. 9 615 (±33) 100 (±25) 98 (±33) Ex. 10 648 (±21) 305 (±20) 350 (±110) Ex. 11 460 550 117 Ex. 12 555 780 241 Ex. 13 640 750 264 Ex. 14 520 840 266 Ex. 15 690 740 145 Ex. 16 690 849 317 Ex. 17 613 918 249 Ex. 18 508 805 254 Ex. 19 454 682 239 Ex. 20 45 570 18 Ex. 21 370 770 103 Ex. 22 649 740 237 Ex. 23 508 805 254
Adhesive Construction From Table III Looptack at 0°C on HDPE N/m Looptack at 5°C on HDPE N/m Ex. 11 2 Ex. 12 19 Ex. 13 64 11 Ex. 14 344 98 Ex. 15 2 Ex. 16 36 Ex. 17 114 26 Ex. 18 167 32 Ex. 19 430 183 Ex. 20 1.2 Ex. 21 1.4 Ex. 22 35 2 Ex. 23 167

The adhesive layers of the present invention may be coated onto facestock or release liners by any means known to those of skill in the art. For example, it is contemplated that adhesive layers 24 and 26 may be applied by solvent coating, hot melt coating, or emulsion coating, at one or more coating stations. Adhesive layers 24 and 26 might also be coated to different substrates, and then be laminated together to form an integral product. Other known methods of simultaneous coating include slide coating, multilayer die coating, or die/slide combination coating.

One preferred method of manufacture uses a multilayer die 50 such as that illustrated in FIG. 5. Although the die shown in FIG. 5 illustrates the application of two coating layers to a substrate 52, it will be understood that the principles of this method are equally applicable to a plurality of layers in addition to two. In accordance with standard practice, the substrate, which in this case preferably comprises silicone coated paper, is referred to as a "web" and is formed into a long roll. The web 52 travels around a back-up roll 54 as it passes the distal end of the multilayer die 50. As shown in FIG. 5, it will be understood that both the die 50 and the web 52 have substantially equal width such that the entire width of the substrate is coated in one pass by the fluid flowing out of the die 50 and onto the web 52. In this case, two separate fluid layers are flowing out of manifolds 56 formed in the die and along individual slots 60 which are defined by the die's distal lands 62. The slots 50 each communicate with the interface between the web 52 and the distal most tips 58 of the die 50. These tips are referred to as the "die lips" 58 and are illustrated and described in more detail in connection with FIG. 6 below.

The multilayer die 50 is modular, thus allowing for variations in the individual slots 60 and lip 58 configurations without necessitating modifications to the other slots and lips. Thus, these geometries can be adjusted in order to achieve successful coating. Other variables include the "coating gap" (c.g.) and the "angle of attack" (a) of the die. As illustrated in FIG. 5, the coating gap is the distance that the lips 58 are set back from the web. The angle of attack (a) is the degree of angular adjustment of the lip surfaces and of the entire die with respect to the outer pointing normal of the web as illustrated in FIG. 7. Another variable is the web speed which may vary between 15-305 meters per minute (50-1000 ft/min) or more.

Either one of two die coating methods may be utilized: interference coating or proximity coating. In the former case, the lips 58 of the die actually are pressed forward in the direction of the web 52, but do not contact the web nor cause any damage thereto, because they hydroplane on a thin layer of coating material. However, the pressure may actually cause the back-up roll 54 (typically constructed from a hard rubber material) to deform in order to relieve the pressure of the die against the lips 58. In proximity coating, the lips 58 of the die 50 are positioned a precise distance from the web 52 and are not pressed forward toward the web. The back-up roll 54 is typically constructed from a stainless steel material which allows for precision in the circumference of the roll and minimizes roll run-out. The method described herein can be successfully utilized with either type of coating technique.

Thus, since very thin layers of high viscosity adhesives are being coated at relatively high web speeds, the process must be carefully controlled.

Such control is accomplished with the present multilayer die coating technique, in part due to the geometry and configuration of the die lips 58. Referring to FIG. 6, there is shown a close-up view of the distal most tips 62 of the multilayer die of FIG. 5, including the lips 58 associated with each slot, showing the interface or coating gap with respect to the web 52. With respect to FIG. 6, it should be noted that, for ease of illustration, the die 50 is shown rotated 90° from the position shown in FIG. 5. Moreover, the web 52 is shown in a horizontal arrangement, when in actuality, there may be a slight curvature to the web 52 and back-up roll (not shown) at this point; however, the distances involved are so short that a good approximation of the fluid dynamics can be achieved by assuming a horizontal web 52.

For consistent reference, the individual lips 58 of the multilayer die 50 shall be referred to with respect to the direction of travel of the web 52. For example, the lip 58a shown to the left in FIG. 6 will be referred to as the "upstream lip," while the right-most lip 58c shall be referred to as the "downstream lip." Thus, the "middle lip" 58b will have that same reference. Accordingly, the upstream and middle lips 58a, 58b define an upstream feed gap 64 through which an adhesive material 66 flows onto the web 52 to form a bottom adhesive layer 68 of a multilayer adhesive product. Likewise, the middle lip 58b and the downstream lip 58c together form a slotted feed gap 70 through which adhesive 72 flows onto the top of the lower layer 68 as the web travels in left-to-right direction, as illustrated in FIG. 6. This forms a top adhesive layer 74 of the multilayer adhesive product. Again, for ease of illustration, the top layer 74 is shown as a darker-colored material, but this may not necessarily be the case in actual production; for instance, various colors or tags such as ultra-violet fluorescent dye may be utilized to facilitate measurement of individual layer thicknesses.

Coating of viscous adhesives at these web speed rates can involve a number of problems. For example, recirculations in the flow of either the bottom or top adhesive layers can result in certain defects in the final multilayer product. Such recirculations may occur if the separation point of either liquid adhesive with respect to the die lips 58 occurs at an inappropriate location. In addition, extreme pressure gradient can result in the upstream leakage of liquid out of the coating gap area, again causing defects in the end product due to nonuniform adhesive layer thicknesses, etc. Moreover, these and other maleffects result in the diffusion of one layer in the other, since they are being coated simultaneously in the liquid state. Such diffusing jeopardizes the integrity and performance of the resulting product.

Thus, it has been found, with respect to the multilayer die coating described herein, that it is very important to control the pressure gradients of the adhesives under each lip. In particular, the top layer should separate from the middle lip at the downstream comer of this lip. In order to achieve such coating control, it will be noted from FIG. 6 that the lips 58 of each die section are stepped or spaced away from the web 52 in the downstream direction. This allows the lips to generate the appropriate pressure gradient and to ensure smooth flow of the adhesive and uniform layer thicknesses. The adjustment of a number of run parameters are necessary in order to achieve this goal. For example, the coating gaps at lip 58b and 58c should be approximately in the range of one to three times the compounded wet film thicknesses of the layers being fed from upstream of said lip. Under the upstream lip 58a, the net flow rate is necessarily zero, and a turn-around flow is the only possibility. Thus, the coating gap under this lip is solely set in order to avoid leakage of the liquid out from the coating gap in the upstream direction. Moreover, the upstream step, defined as dimension A in FIG. 6, and the downstream step, defined as dimension B, may range anywhere from zero to 0.01cm (0 to 0.004 inches). The feed gaps (defined as dimensions C and D in FIG. 6) can also be adjusted anywhere between 0.002cm and 0.04cm (0.001 to 0.015 inches), preferably not to exceed five times the wet film thickness of their correspondent layers. In addition, the length of the lips 58 in the direction of web travel play an important role in achieving the proper pressure gradient. Thus, the upstream lip 58a should be approximately two millimeters in length, or more, as necessary to seal the head as noted above. The downstream lip 58c and middle lip 58b may fall within the range of 0.1-3 mm in length.

It will be recognized that one of ordinary skill in the art can adjust these various parameters in order to achieve the proper fluid dynamics for uniform layer coating. Of course, persons of more than ordinary skill can adjust the die and run parameters more precisely in order to achieve good results. However, such persons are not always readily available in production settings. Therefore, it is advantageous to provide a die geometry which will increase the size of the window of successful multilayer coating operation. This can be achieved by certain adjustments in the orientation of the die lips.

Thus, FIG. 7 illustrates the die 50 of FIG. 6 rotated slightly in the clockwise direction representing an "angle of attack α. For consistent reference, the angle of attack (α) shown in FIG. 7 represents a negative angle of attack, or a "converging" orientation of the downstream lip 58c with respect to the web 52. This converging lip orientation provides a negative pressure gradient (in the direction of web travel), along the downstream lip 58c, which is beneficial in preventing a coating defect well known as "ribbing," a pattern of regular striation in the sense of the web travel in the film. The fact that the middle and the upstream lips 58a and 58c also achieve a convergent orientation is not particularly beneficial. Although the angle of attack of the die can be varied widely in order to achieve these advantages, it has been found that angles in the rate of 0° to -5° are appropriate.

An even further successful operating window can be achieved with additional lip modifications. Shown in FIG. 8 is a variation of the lip configuration of FIG. 7, illustrating "beveled" lips. In this configuration, the downstream lip 58c is angled or beveled to as to have a converging profile, similar to that shown in FIG. 7. However, the middle lip 58b is positioned so as to be flat or parallel with respect to the web 52. The upstream lip 58a, on the other hand, is beveled so that it is diverging from the web 52 in the downstream direction. This configuration, again, provides the appropriate pressure gradient under the individual lips to avoid recirculations and upstream leakage. Moreover, if perturbations in the coating conditions occur (such as, for example, due to roll run-out, foreign objects on the web, variations in ambient pressure, etc.), the converging configuration of the upstream lip 58a shown in FIG. 8 will produce a dampening effect on flow conditions so that defects in the coating layers do not occur. In this manner, the multilayer coating bead acts as a nonlinear spring to dampen out such unwanted events in order to return to steady state. The die 50 can then be adjusted in accordance with standard angle of attack variations to achieve favorable coating conditions. Because the lips 58 are pre-disposed or beveled in a favorable orientation, the adjustment of angle of attack, as well as coating gap, need not be so precise. Thus, persons of ordinary skill or even less skill can successfully achieve good coating results.

It will be understood, however, by those of ordinary skill in the multilayer coating art, that multilayer die coating can be achieved in a variety of ways similar to those described above, or in other ways, and with appropriate adjustments of the various parameters for coating.

CONVERTING EXPERIMENT

To assess the converting characteristics of pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions of the present invention, a converting trial was performed.

A dual die apparatus was used to hot melt coat the adhesive formulations of Table I to form the adhesive constructions disclosed in Table III. The Lower Adhesive Layer, as designated in Table III, was coated on a 0.4m (15 inches) wide release liner consisting of 18kg (40 lb.) silicone coated backing paper. The Upper Adhesive Layer, as disclosed in Table III, was then coated on the Lower Adhesive Layer substantially simultaneously by the dual die apparatus. A 60# High Gloss white facestock was then laminated to the Upper Adhesive Layer to form the final pressure-sensitive adhesive construction. The formulations coated and the coat weight of the respective adhesive layers was varied in accordance with the data disclosed in Table III, and the Examples numbers in Table V, below, denote the equivalent construction from Table III.

As a control, pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions, similar to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions in having one adhesive composition with its characteristic glass transition temperature, were formed with Formulations 1, 6, and 7 at coat weights of 20 g/m2, using the same facestock and release liner. These laminated controls were equivalent to Examples 5, 15, and 18 of Table III, respectively.

The control and multilayer pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions were then converted through a Mark Andy Model 1420 press utilizing an X-die (4 labels across, 0.02m (15/16") label width, .09m (3.42") label length, 0.002m (3/32") radius rounded label comer, with a 0.002m (1/16") cross direction matrix and a 0.003m (7/64") machine direction matrix), and a V-die (1 label across, 0.02m (15/16") label width, 0.36m (14") label length, 0.002m (1/16") cross direction matrix, 0.01m (1/2") machine direction matrix). After the die cutting operation, the matrix surrounding the labels was peeled away to leave rows of four rectangular labels adhered to the release liner in the case of the X-die conversion, and one label across in the case of the V-die conversion.

The efficacy of the converting process was monitored by the press operator, who observed the die cutting and matrix stripping operations. The existence of "hangers," a term used to describe an adverse converting condition where pieces of the matrix are left on the release liner, were noted as a function of the press speed. Faster press speeds and an absence of hangers is indicative of a construction which converts better. In addition, label predispensing (another adverse converting condition) was also noted, although this condition is less dependent on converting speed than are the formation of flags and hangers.

The data from the converting trials are disclosed in Table V. The reported speed in Meters/Min is the maximum converting press speed that could be obtained without experiencing hangers. This data demonstrates that the multilayer construction of the present invention show improved converting performance in relation to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions using similar adhesive compositions. For instance, when converted as above Example 3 showed no hangers at converting speeds of up to 244 meters per minute (800 feet/min). In contrast, for the control, Example 5, hangers were noted at an approximate press speed of 198 meters per minute (650 feet/min), and press speed had to be reduced to 189 meters per minute (600 feet/min). Similar results are shown for Example 12 and for Example 16 in comparison to the control, Example 18. Furthermore, although not disclosed in Table V, multilayer adhesive constructions made in accordance with the present invention and formed of acrylic emulsion systems exhibited improved convertability. Thus, the multilayer constructions of the present invention converted at higher speeds with less adverse effects than did the conventional pressure-sensitive adhesive constructions.

In a separate converting trial, the effects of increasing coat weight on converting performance were investigated. Formulation 3 from Table I was hot melt coated as a single layer on a 40# silicone coated release layer. A 60# High Gloss white facestock was then applied. Three different coat weights, of 15 g/m2, 20 g/m2, and 25 g/m2 were applied to form three constructions. These constructions were converted through a Mark Andy press, as described above. It was observed that the 15 g/m2 coat weight construction converted at 213 meters/min (700 feet/min), the 20 g/m2 coat weight construction at 198 meters/min (650 feet/min), and the 25 g/m2 coat weight construction at 96 meters/min (315 feet/min). Thus, for the single-layer construction, rubber-based PSA control used in these tests, converting speed was seen to decrease dramatically at coat weights over 25 g/m2. Adhesive Construction From Table III Convertibility Using X-Die Meters/Min Convertibility Using V-Die Meters/Min Ex. 3 244 Ex. 5 183 Ex. 11 pred, 244 pred, 229 Ex. 12 pred, pred 274, 274 Ex. 13 271, 270 271, 271 Ex. 14 271, 238 226, 226 Ex. 15 pred, pred 271, 274 Ex. 16 pred, pred 271, 271 Ex. 17 265, 244 271, 268 Ex. 18 244, 198 229, 229 Ex. 19 259, 168 220, 238 Ex. 22 pred, pred 277, 290 Ex. 23 244, 198 229, 229


Anspruch[de]
  1. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel mit verbesserter Konvertibilität, dadurch gekennzeichnet, daß der Aufbau aufweist:
    • eine erste Oberfläche;
    • eine erste Klebstoffschicht auf der ersten Oberfläche, wobei die erste Klebstoffschicht eine erste Klebstoffzusammensetzung hat mit einer ersten Glasübergangstemperatur und mit einem Tangens Delta größer als 0,5 bei 102 Radian (rad) pro Sekunde bei 20°C und einem Speichermodul größer als 3 x 108 dyn/cm2 bei 104 rad pro Sekunde bei 20°C;
    • eine zweite Klebstoffschicht auf der ersten Klebstoffschicht, wobei die zweite Klebstoffschicht eine zweite Klebstoffzusammensetzung mit einer zweiten Glasübergangstemperatur hat; und
    • eine zweite Oberfläche.
  2. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach Anspruch 1, wobei die erste Oberfläche eine Trennfläche ist und die zweite Oberfläche ein Sichtmaterial ist.
  3. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach Anspruch 1, wobei die erste Oberfläche ein Sichtmaterial und die zweite Oberfläche eine Trennfläche ist.
  4. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach Ansprüchen 1 bis 3, wobei die zweite Glasübergangstemperatur von 10°C bis 50°C niedriger ist als die erste Glasübergangstemperatur.
  5. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach Anspruch 2, wobei die zweite Glasübergangstemperatur von 15°C bis 35°C niedriger ist als die erste Glasübergangstemperatur.
  6. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 5, wobei die erste Klebstoffschicht eine erste Polymerkomponente aufweist und die zweite Klebstoffschicht eine zweite Polymerkomponente aufweist und mindestens eine der Polymerschichten aus der Gruppe ausgewählt ist, die aus Blockcopolymeren von Styrol-Butadien-Styrol, Styrol-Isopren-Styrol, Styrol-Butadien, Styrol-Isopren, vielfach verzweigtes Styrol-Butadien und vielfach verzweigtes Styrol-Isopren besteht.
  7. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 6, wobei mindestens eine der ersten oder zweiten Klebstoffzusammensetzungen ein Gemisch aus Styrol-Isopren-Styrol und Styrol-Butadien-Blockcopolymeren ist.
  8. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 7, ferner mit einem klebrig machenden Additiv in mindestens einem der ersten und zweiten Klebstoffzusammensetzungen, wobei das klebrig machende Additiv in einer Gewichtskonzentration von 40% bis 90% zugegen ist.
  9. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 8, ferner mit einem Weichmacher, der in mindestens einer der ersten und zweiten Klebstoffzusammensetzungen zugegen ist, wobei der Weichmacher in einer Gewichtskonzentration von 1 % bis 30% zugegen ist.
  10. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 9, wobei mindestens eine der ersten und zweiten Klebstoffschichten ein Polymer auf Acrylbasis enthält.
  11. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach Anspruch 10, wobei das Polymer auf Acrylbasis aus einer Polymerisation mindestens eines Alkylacrylat-Monomers gebildet wurde, welches von 4 bis 12 Kohlenstoffatome in der Alkylgruppe enthält, und wobei das Alkylacrylat-Monomer in einer Gewichtsmenge von 35 bis 95% des Polymers zugegen ist.
  12. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach Ansprüchen 8 oder 9, wobei die erste und zweite Klebstoffschicht eine elastomere Polymerkomponente enthalten und das Gewichtsverhältnis der Summe der elastomeren Polymerkomponente zu der Summe migrierender Klebrigmacher und Weichmacher in der ersten Klebstoffschicht etwa gleich ist dem Gewichtsverhältnis der Summe der elastomeren Polymerkomponente zu der Summe migrierender Klebrigmacher und Weichmacher in der zweiten Klebstoffschicht.
  13. Aufbau mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 12, wobei eine oder mehrere zusätzliche Klebstoffschichten zwischen der ersten Klebstoffschicht und der zweiten Klebstoffschicht angeordnet sind.
  14. Verfahren zum Herstellen eines Aufbaues mit druckempfindlichem Klebemittel nach Anspruch 1, dadurch gekennzeichnet, daß das Verfahren aufweist:
    • Vorsehen einer ersten Oberfläche;
    • Aufbringen einer ersten druckempfindlichen Klebstoffschicht auf die erste Oberfläche, wobei die erste druckempfindliche Klebstoffschicht eine erste Klebstoffzusammensetzung aufweist mit einer ersten Glasübergangstemperatur und mit einem Tangens Delta größer als 0,5 bei 102 rad pro Sekunde bei 20°C und einem Speichermodul größer als 3 x 108 dyn/cm2 bei 104 rad pro Sekunde bei 20°C;
    • Aufbringen einer zweiten druckempfindlichen Klebstoffschicht auf die erste druckempfindliche Klebstoffschicht, wobei die zweite druckempfindliche Klebstoffschicht eine zweite Klebstoffzusammensetzung aufweist mit einer zweiten Glasübergangstemperatur; und
    • Aufbringen einer zweiten Oberfläche auf die zweite druckempfindliche Klebstoffschicht.
  15. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14, wobei die zweite Glasübergangstemperatur um 10°C bis 50°C niedriger ist als die erste Glasübergangstemperatur.
  16. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14 oder Anspruch 15, wobei die erste Oberfläche eine Trennfläche und die zweite Oberfläche ein Sichtmaterial ist.
  17. Verfahren nach Anspruch 14 oder Anspruch 15, wobei die erste Oberfläche ein Sichtmaterial und die zweite Oberfläche eine Trennfläche ist.
  18. Verfahren nach einem der Ansprüche 14 bis 17, wobei die erste und zweite Klebstoffschicht durch ein Zweifachwerkzeug im wesentlichen gleichzeitig aufgebracht werden.
Anspruch[en]
  1. A pressure-sensitive adhesive construction with improved convertibility, characterized in that the construction comprises:
    • a first surface;
    • a first adhesive layer on the first surface, the first adhesive layer comprising a first adhesive composition having a first glass transition temperature, and having a tangent delta greater than 0.5 at 102 radians per second at 20°C, and a storage modulus greater than 3 x 108 dynes/cm2 at 104 radians per second at 20°C;
    • a second adhesive layer on the first adhesive layer, the second adhesive layer comprising a second adhesive composition with a second glass transition temperature; and
    • a second surface.
  2. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of claim 1, wherein said first surface is a release surface and said second surface is a facestock.
  3. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of claim 1 wherein said first surface is a facestock and said second surface is a release surface.
  4. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of claims 1 to 3, wherein the second glass transition temperature is from 10°C to 50°C lower than the first glass transition temperature.
  5. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of claim 2, wherein the second glass transition temperature is from 15°C to 35°C lower than the first glass transition temperature.
  6. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of any of claims 1-5, wherein the first adhesive layer comprises a first polymeric component, and the second adhesive layer comprises a second polymeric component, and at least one of the polymeric components is selected from the group consisting of block copolymers of styrene-butadiene-styrene, styrene-isoprene-styrene, styrene-butadiene, styrene-isoprene, multibranched styrene-butadiene, and multibranched styrene-isoprene.
  7. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of any of claims 1-6, wherein at least one of the first or second adhesive compositions is a blend of styrene-isoprene-styrene and styrene-butadiene block copolymers.
  8. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of any of claims 1-7, further comprising a tackifier additive in at least one of the first and second adhesive compositions, wherein the tackifier additive is present in a concentration by weight of from 40% to 90%.
  9. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of any of claims 1-8, further comprising a plasticizer present in at least one of the first and second adhesive compositions, wherein the plasticizer is present in a concentration by weight of from 1% to 30%.
  10. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of any of claims 1-9, wherein at least one of the first and second adhesive layers contains an acrylic-based polymer:
  11. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of claim 10, wherein the acrylic-based polymer has been formed from polymerization of at least one alkyl acrylate monomer containing from 4 to 12 carbon atoms in the alkyl group, and wherein said alkyl acrylate monomer is present in an amount from 35-95% by weight of the polymer.
  12. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of claims 8 or 9, wherein the first and second adhesive layers contain an elastomeric polymer component, and the weight ratio of the sum of elastomeric polymer component to the sum of migratory tackifiers and plasticizers in the first adhesive layer is approximately equal to the weight ratio of the sum of elastomeric polymer component to the sum of migratory tackifiers and plasticizers in the second adhesive layer.
  13. The pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of any one of claims 1 to 12, wherein one or more additional adhesive layers are positioned between the first adhesive layer and the second adhesive layer.
  14. A method of producing the pressure-sensitive adhesive construction of claim 1characterized in that the method comprises:
    • providing a first surface;
    • applying a first pressure-sensitive adhesive layer to the first surface, wherein the first pressure-sensitive adhesive layer includes a first adhesive composition having a first glass transition temperature and having a tangent delta greater than 0.5 at 102 radians per second at 20°C, and a storage modulus greater than 3 x 108 dynes/cm2 at 104 radians per second at 20°C;
    • applying a second pressure-sensitive adhesive layer to the first pressure-sensitive adhesive layer, wherein the second pressure-sensitive adhesive layer includes a second adhesive composition having a second glass transition temperature; and
    • applying a second surface to the second pressure-sensitive adhesive layer.
  15. The method of claim 14, wherein the second glass transition temperature is lower than the first glass transition temperature by 10°C to 50°C.
  16. The method of claim 14 or claim 15, wherein the first surface is a release surface and the second surface is a facestock.
  17. The method of claim 14 or claim 15, wherein the first surface is a facestock and the second surface is a release surface.
  18. The method of any of claims 14-17, wherein the first and second adhesive layers are applied substantially simultaneously by a dual die.
Anspruch[fr]
  1. Structure adhésive autocollante ayant une convertibilité améliorée, caractérisée en ce que la structure comprend :
    • une première surface ;
    • une première couche adhésive sur la première surface, la première couche adhésive comprenant une première composition adhésive ayant une première température de transition vitreuse et ayant une tangente delta supérieure à 0,5 à 102 radians par seconde à 20°C, et un module d'accumulation supérieur à 3 × 108 dynes/cm2 à 104 radians par seconde à 20°C ;
    • une seconde couche adhésive sur la première couche adhésive, la seconde couche adhésive comprenant une seconde composition adhésive ayant une seconde température de transition vitreuse ; et
    • une seconde surface.
  2. Structure adhésive autocollante selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle ladite première surface est une surface antiadhésive et ladite seconde surface est un matériau de base à face plane.
  3. Structure adhésive autocollante selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle ladite première surface est un matériau de base à face plane et ladite seconde surface est une surface antiadhésive.
  4. Structure adhésive autocollante selon les revendications 1 à 3, dans laquelle la seconde température de transition vitreuse est inférieure de 10°C à 50°C à la première température de transition vitreuse.
  5. Structure adhésive autocollante selon la revendication 2, dans laquelle la seconde température de transition vitreuse est inférieure de 15°C à 35°C à la première température de transition vitreuse.
  6. Structure adhésive autocollante selon les revendications 1 à 5, dans laquelle la première couche adhésive comprend un premier composant polymère et la seconde couche adhésive comprend un second composant polymère, et au moins l'un des composants polymères est choisi dans le groupe formé par les copolymères séquencés de styrène-butadiène-styrène, styrène-isoprène-styrène, styrène-butadiène, styrène-isoprène, styrène-butadiène multiramifié et styrène-isoprène multiramifié.
  7. Structure adhésive autocollante selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 6, dans laquelle au moins l'une des première ou seconde compositions adhésives est un mélange de copolymères séquencés styrène-isoprène-styrène et styrène-butadiène.
  8. Structure adhésive autocollante selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 7, comprenant de plus un additif d'adhésivité dans au moins l'une des première et seconde compositions adhésives, l'additif d'adhésivité étant présent à une concentration de 40 % à 90 % en poids.
  9. Structure adhésive autocollante selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 8, comprenant de plus un plastifiant présent dans au moins l'une des première et seconde compositions adhésives, le plastifiant étant présent à une concentration de 1 % à 30 % en poids.
  10. Structure adhésive autocollante selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 9, dans laquelle au moins l'une des première et seconde couches adhésives contient un polymère à base acrylique.
  11. Structure adhésive autocollante selon la revendication 10, dans laquelle le polymère à base acrylique a été formé par polymérisation d'au moins un acrylate d'alkyle monomère dont le groupe alkyle contient 4 à 12 atomes de carbone, et dans laquelle ledit acrylate d'alkyle monomère est présent en une quantité de 35 à 95 % en poids du polymère.
  12. Structure adhésive autocollante selon la revendication 8 ou 9, dans laquelle les première et seconde couches adhésives contiennent un composant polymère élastomère, et le rapport en poids de la somme du composant polymère élastomère à la somme des agents d'adhésivité et plastifiants migrateurs dans la première couche adhésive est à peu près égal au rapport en poids de la somme du composant polymère élastomère à la somme des agents d'adhésivité et plastifiants migrateurs dans la seconde couche adhésive.
  13. Structure adhésive autocollante selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 12, dans laquelle une ou plusieurs couches adhésives supplémentaires sont disposées entre la première couche adhésive et la seconde couche adhésive.
  14. Procédé de production de la structure adhésive autocollante selon la revendication 1, caractérisé en ce que le procédé comprend :
    • la fourniture d'une première surface ;
    • l'application d'une première couche adhésive autocollante à la première surface, la première couche adhésive autocollante comprenant une première composition adhésive ayant une première température de transition vitreuse et ayant une tangente delta supérieure à 0,5 à 102 radians par seconde à 20°C, et un module d'accumulation supérieur à 3 × 108 dynes/cm2 à 104 radians par seconde à 20°C ;
    • l'application d'une seconde couche adhésive autocollante à la première couche adhésive autocollante, la seconde couche adhésive autocollante comprenant une seconde composition adhésive ayant une seconde température de transition vitreuse ; et
    • l'application d'une seconde surface à la seconde couche adhésive autocollante.
  15. Procédé selon la revendication 14, dans lequel la seconde température de transition vitreuse est inférieure de 10°C à 50°C à la première température de transition vitreuse.
  16. Procédé selon la revendication 14 ou la revendication 15, dans lequel la première surface est une surface antiadhésive et la seconde surface est un matériau de base à face plane.
  17. Procédé selon la revendication 14 ou la revendication 15, dans lequel la première surface est un matériau de base à face plane et la seconde surface est une surface antiadhésive.
  18. Procédé selon l'une quelconque des revendications 14 à 17, dans lequel les première et seconde couches adhésives sont appliquées sensiblement simultanément par une filière double.






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