PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP0988698 17.02.2005
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0000988698
Titel GYRATOR
Anmelder Nortel Networks Ltd., St. Laurent, Quebec, CA
Erfinder BROWN, Kevin, Anthony, Kanata, CA
Vertreter G. Koch und Kollegen, 80339 München
DE-Aktenzeichen 69923131
Vertragsstaaten DE, FR, GB
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 25.03.1999
EP-Aktenzeichen 999100563
WO-Anmeldetag 25.03.1999
PCT-Aktenzeichen PCT/CA99/00255
WO-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0099053614
WO-Veröffentlichungsdatum 21.10.1999
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 29.03.2000
EP date of grant 12.01.2005
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 17.02.2005
IPC-Hauptklasse H03H 11/50
IPC-Nebenklasse H03B 5/20   

Beschreibung[en]
TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a gyrator forming a resonant circuit.

BACKGROUND ART

In modern communications systems, low phase noise oscillators are required as an integral part of the process of transporting data. While ever increasing data rates are employed, it becomes more and more difficult to meet the requirements for low phase noise. In many applications, the requirement for low phase noise has been met by means of oscillators with fixed frequencies or narrow band tuning range which utilizes some form of a resonant tank circuit of high quality factor (Q). The tank circuit limits the noise bandwidth of the oscillator circuit. In applications where a wider tuning range is needed, it is possible to use a multiple of such oscillators with overlapping tuning ranges. Such arrangements, however, are cumbersome and an alternative class of broad tuning range low noise integrated oscillator is desirable.

United States Patent 5,371,475 granted to A.K.D. Brown on December 6, 1994 describes the principles of operation of a class of low noise oscillators, which are known as gyrators. The principles of a conventional gyrator is fully described in the patent. United States Patent 5,483,195 granted to A.K.D. Brown on January 9,1996 describes means of obtaining a broad tuning range for a gyrator oscillator which is independent of process and temperature variations. The prior gyrator needs improvement on achievement of broad tuning range concurrently with low phase noise, for some applications. A paper by A.K.D. Brown entitled "An integrated low power microwave VCO with sub-picosecond phase jitter", IEEE 96CH35966, IEEE BCTM 10.3, pp. 165-168 describes phase noise analysis of gyrators.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a gyrator with an improved phase noise performance.

According the present invention as defined in claim 1, there is provided a gyrator forming a resonant circuit comprising: a loop having ports 1 and 2, each port having two terminals, the loop comprising loop-connected first and second amplifiers, the gain of the loop being more than unity; capacitive means for coupling the terminals of the respective ports, thereby causing effective nodal capacitance in each port and effective nodal inductance in the other port, the capacitance and inductance determining the resonant frequency of the gyrator; and inductive means for coupling the terminals of the respective ports to the supply voltage thereby varying effective nodal capacitance in the respective port.

For example, the capacitive means is capacitance elements. Each of them is connected between the terminals of each port, or between the terminal of one port and the respective terminal of the other port. The inductive means is inductance elements. Each of them is connected to the respective terminal of the port. The effective nodal capacitance is reduced by the inductance elements. The gyrator oscillatory frequency exceeds the maximum oscillation frequency possible in a gyrator without inductance elements.

The inductive elements act to discriminate against injected power supply noise, resulting in improved oscillator phase noise. The dc voltage drop of the inductor is less than that of the original resistive load, resulting in larger linear oscillations and reduction in the oscillator phase noise.

According to another aspect of the present invention, first and second amplifiers of the loop comprises first and second differential amplifiers, respectively, each differential amplifier having inverting and non-inverting inputs and outputs. The loop comprises amplifier coupling means for coupling the inverting and non-inverting outputs of the first differential amplifier to the non-inverting and inverting inputs of the second differential amplifier, respectively, and for coupling the inverting and non-inverting outputs of the second differential amplifier to the inverting and non-inverting inputs of the first differential amplifier, respectively, the gain of the loop comprising the first and second differential amplifiers being greater than unity. Each of the first and second differential amplifiers has a generally 90 degree phase shift between its input and output at the resonant frequency.

For example, each of the first and second differential amplifiers comprises a variable transconductance amplifier. The variable transconductance amplifier comprises tuning means for tuning with a differential voltage. The variable transconductance amplifier further comprises automatic gain control means which is electrically separated from the tuning means. The tuning control means is functionally dependent upon the automatic gain control means. The automatic gain control means comprises a fast acting control loop to ensure oscillation stability under rapid tuning variations.

The gyrator further comprises a fast control loop and a slower control loop for precision vernier adjustment of an output signal level. An output oscillation frequency of the gyrator responds to the variation of the transconductance of the transconductance amplifiers.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Embodiments of the present invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

  • Figure 1 illustrates a prior art gyrator;
  • Figure 2 illustrates a model of a prior art gyrator;
  • Figure 3 illustrates a model of another prior art gyrator;
  • Figure 4 illustrates a model of an embodiment of a gyrator according to the present invention;
  • Figure 5 illustrates a model of another embodiment of a gyrator according to the present invention;
  • Figure 6 is a graph of angular frequency - gyrator nodal impedance;
  • Figure 7 illustrates a model of another embodiment of a gyrator according to the present invention;
  • Figure 8 illustrates a model of another embodiment of a gyrator according to the present invention;
  • Figure 9 is a schematic diagram of an embodiment of a gyrator according to the present invention;
  • Figure 10 is a block diagram of a variable linear transconductance amplifier used in the gyrator shown in Figure 9;
  • Figure 11 is a schematic diagram of a tuning circuit used in the transconductance amplifier shown in Figure 10;
  • Figure 12 is a schematic diagram of a variable gain linear transconductance amplifier used in the transconductance amplifier shown in Figure 10;
  • Figure 13 is a schematic diagram of an automatic gain control circuit used in the transconductance amplifier shown in Figure 9;
  • Figure 14 is a schematic diagram of another embodiment of a gyrator according to the present invention;
  • Figure 15 is a schematic diagram of a gyrator according to another embodiment of the present invention;
  • Figure 16 is a schematic diagram of a transconductance amplifier used in the gyrator shown in Figure 15;
  • Figure 17 is a schematic diagram of a peak detector used in the transconductance amplifier shown in Figure 16; and
  • Figure 18 is a schematic diagram of an output buffer and bias circuit used in the transconductance amplifier shown in Figure 16.

BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION I. Prior Art I-1. Gyrator

Figure 1 shows a prior art gyrator including two amplifiers A1 and A2, the gains of which are usually the same. The inverting and non-inverting outputs ON and OP of the amplifier A1 are connected to the inverting and non-inverting inputs IN and IF of the amplifier A2, respectively. The inverting and non-inverting outputs ON and OP of the amplifier A2 are connected to the non-inverting and inverting inputs IP and IN of the amplifier A1, respectively. The amplifiers A1 and A2 are coupled to form a loop, the total gain of which is greater than unity. The outputs of the amplifiers A1 and A2 are ports 1 and 2 of the gyrator, respectively. Operation of the gyrator is described in United States Patent 5,483,195.

I-2. Gyrator Model

Figure 2 shows a model of a prior art gyrator having shunt nodal capacitors. The gyrator has two ports - Port 1 and Port 2. Each port has two terminals and a shunt nodal capacitor C is connected between the two terminals which are connected to a terminal of supply voltage Vcc via load resistors R. Figure 3 shows another prior art gyrator having Miller feedback nodal capacitors C, instead of shunt nodal capacitors. The principles of operation of these gyrators have been fully described in United States Patent 5,371,475. Two semi-orthogonal conditions exist for the gyrator of Figure 1 which are required for unity loop gain at which the gyrator will oscillate. Two possible topologies exist for the basic gyrator circuit as shown in Figures 2 and 3, for which identical unity gain conditions exist as: ω0 = g / (C + GD) D = G / (ω02 C)

Here, ω0 is a resonant angular frequency, g is a gyrator amplifier transconductance, G is a load loss admittance, D is an amplifier built in delay.

It is noted that the amplifiers in Figures 2 and 3 are realized by Voltage Controlled Delayed Current Sources (VCDCS), which are described in detail in the beforementioned paper by A. K. D. Brown, entitled "An integrated low power microwave VCO with sub-picosecond phase jitter"

These gyrators are unique in the sense that they emulate a high Q parallel LRC resonant tank circuit with measured Q factors of 250, without employing a physical inductor. The inductor of the resonant circuit is obtained by transforming the capacitive reactance on one of the gyrator nodes so that it appears as an inductor in parallel with the capacitive reactance on the other node. While this feature is highly desirable in supplying a highly selective resonant circuit which suppresses the circuit noise, it is less effective in its ability to suppress unwanted noise from external sources. In this respect, the circuit is twice as sensitive to the effects of externally induced noise as compared to a conventional resonator with passive inductor. This is important because such high frequency noise can modulate the oscillator frequency and alias down into the frequency band of interest.

It will be apparent that the gyrator circuit would be improved if the capacitors could be replaced by inductors: thus one could notionally transform the inductive reactance at one node into a capacitive reactance at the other node and so form a resonant circuit. A mathematical treatment of this procedure, however, results in the requirement that the value of the inductors required for oscillation are finite and negative. Thus, this is not a practical solution.

With reference to Figure 2, the capacitive admittance at either node (nodal admittance Y) is described as: Y = G + jωC

The net loss admittance is capacitive. This is a necessary condition for the gyrator to oscillate, as the analysis for a purely inductive circuit shows.

II. First Embodiment Gyrator II-1. Gyrator Model

Figure 4 shows a model of an embodiment gyrator with shunt nodal capacitors and load inductors. In Figure 4, the gyrator has two ports - Port 1 and Port 2, each port having two terminals. Each port is provided with a shunt nodal capacitor C between its terminals which are connected to a terminal of supply voltage Vcc via load inductors L. Figure 5 shows a model of another embodiment gyrator having Miller feedback capacitors and load inductors. Figure 6 illustrates a nodal impedance Zn as function of angular frequency ω. The capacitive admittance at either port (nodal admittance Y) is described as: Y = G + jωC + 1 / jωL Y = G + j(ωC - 1 / ωL)

Note the admittance on the imaginary axis can be either capacitive or inductive depending upon the relative magnitude of the capacitance C and inductance L, and, most importantly, the magnitude of the angular frequency ω. At the natural resonant frequency ω0 of the parallel C and L, their loss admittances are equal, so that the net loss admittance is G (resistive) and the circuit will not oscillate. At frequencies above the frequency ω0, the capacitive term dominates and the net admittance is capacitive. At this point it is essential to note that the presence of the inductance effectively reduces the capacitive admittance. Therefore, introduced is equivalent capacitance C' which determines new oscillating frequency ωosc of the gyrator according to Equation 1 and Equation 2 such that: C' = C - (1/ω2L)

From Equation 6, it is possible to reduce the effective nodal capacitance Yn by partially cancelling it with the inductor, giving rise to the following desirable attributes:

  • (1) The oscillatory frequency of the gyrator can be raised higher than that attainable for the conventional gyrator of Figures 2 and 3 by introducing a parallel inductor to partially cancel the nodal capacitance as in Figure 4.
  • (2) Alternatively a larger nodal capacitance can be employed at the same oscillator frequency by introducing a parallel inductor to partially cancel the nodal capacitance.

The ability to raise the oscillator frequency is very useful when the desired frequency is otherwise unattainable in a conventional gyrator due to parasitic capacitances.

The ability to increase the nodal capacitance is desirable when the gyrator nodal capacitance largely consists of non-linear parasitic capacitance which lowers the Q factor of the gyrator. By introducing a shunt linear capacitor and a shunt inductor, the net capacitance is more linear since the parasitics are largely swamped, while the same resonant frequency is attained.

In addition, the shunt load resistor used in the conventional gyrator appears in parallel with the added inductor and an equivalent Q factor can be calculated for the inductor resistor combination. Conveniently, the shunt resistor inductor combination can be replaced by a series combination of the inductor and a resistor having the same combined Q factor. The value of the series resistor is calculated to achieve the same Q factor as for the shunt inductor resistor combination. In practice, integrated inductors can be designed having the required Q factor without the requirement for an additional series resistor.

Figure 6 shows the nodal impedance as a function of angular frequency, where ω0 is the resonant angular frequency and ωosc is the oscillating angular frequency. The oscillating angular frequency ωosc is shifted from the resonant angular frequency ωo by C'.

Figure 7 shows a model of an embodiment gyrator wherein nodal shunt capacitances are combination of parasitic capacitances C and additional capacitances Cad. The gyrator improves its linearity. Figure 8 shows a model of an embodiment gyrator wherein nodal shunt capacitances are combination of capacitances C and additional capacitances Cad. The gyrator increases its oscillation frequency and improves its linearity.

Three examples will be given below for the comparison purpose.

Example 1: Prior Art Gyrator of Figure 2

  • Resonant Frequency = 1 GHz
  • Nodal Capacitance C = 1 pF
  • Shunt Load Resistance = 350 Ω

Embodiment Gyrator of Figure 4

  • Oscillation Frequency = 2 GHz
  • Inductance L = 8.7 nH

       (Inductor's Q factor =3.3)

Note that the parallel resonance frequency of the 1 pF capacitor and 8.4 nH inductor is 1.73 GHz and the equivalent capacitive reactance of the parallel combination at the 2 GHz oscillation frequency is 0.25 pF. In this example, the oscillating angular frequency ωosc is shifted from the resonant angular frequency ωo to a higher frequency (see Figure 6).

Example 2: Prior Art Gyrator

  • Resonant Frequency = 1 GHz
  • Nodal Capacitance C = 1 pF

       (consisting of non-linear circuit parasitics)
  • Shunt Load Resistance = 350 Ω

Embodiment Gyrator (see Figure 7)

  • Oscillation Frequency = 1 GHz
  • Inductance L = 12.7 nH

       (Inductor's Q factor = 4.38)
  • Additional Shunt Capacitance Cad = 2 pF

Note that the self resonant frequency of the parallel inductor capacitor combination is 0.816 GHz. The equivalent nodal capacitance is still 1 pF. In this example, the oscillating angular frequency ωOSC is substantially the same as the resonant angular frequency ωO.

Example 3: Prior Art Gyrator

  • Resonant Frequency = 1 GHz
  • Nodal Capacitance C = 1 pF
  • Shunt Load Resistance = 350 Ω

Embodiment (see Figure 8)

  • Oscillation Frequency = 2 GHz
  • Inductance L = 3.6 nH

       (Inductor's Q factor = 7.73)
  • Additional Shunt Capacitance Cad = 1 pF

In this example, the gyrator oscillation frequency can be increased to a 2 GHz oscillation frequency while at the same time doubling the nodal capacitance linearity.

Thus, the ability to double the gyrator frequency while doubling the nodal capacitance can be achieved by replacing the shunt nodal load resistor with a shunt lossy inductor which at the same time achieves the purpose of discriminating against injected power supply noise. The filtering action of the inductor depends on the inductor capacitor combination and is enhanced where the nodal capacitance is increased. In the case of example 2, the attenuation of high frequency power supply noise increases at 12 dB per octave above 1 GHz as compared to the unmodified gyrator with 6 dB per octave. Thus, the improved gyrator has 43.6 dB attenuation of 10 GHz noise as compared to the unmodified gyrator with 27.2 dB.

A further advantage of replacing the resistive loads with lossy inductive loads is that the passive inductors can store energy, thus permitting voltage excursions above the supply rail. Also, of great advantage is the increased voltage swing possible with a given power supply since the dc voltage drop due to the 350 Ω load resistor is no longer present.

II-2. Detailed Circuit of the First Embodiment Gyrator

Referring to Figure 9 which shows a gyrator according to an embodiment of the present invention, the gyrator includes two variable linear transconductance amplifiers (VLTAs) 2111 and 2112 having the same circuit configuration and an automatic gain control (AGC) circuit 213. Each of the VLTAs 2111 and 2112 has inverting and non-inverting inputs IN and IP and inverting and non-inverting outputs ON and OP. Each VLTA provides differential output voltage between its non-inverting and inverting outputs OP and ON in response to differential input voltage fed between its non-inverting and inverting inputs IP and IN. The outputs OP and ON of the VLTA 2111 are connected to the inputs IN and IP of the VLTA 2112 via capacitors 2171 and 2172, respectively. The outputs OP and ON of the VLTA 2112 are connected to the inputs IP and IN of the VLTA 2111 via capacitors 2191 and 2192, respectively. Each of the capacitors 2171, 2172, 2191 and 2192 has capacitance Cc. The inputs IP and IN of the VLTA 2111 are connected to a bias terminal 221 to which bias voltage Vb1 is fed, via resistors 223P and 223N, respectively. The inputs IP and IN of the VLTA 2111 are connected to the ground terminal via capacitors 225P and 225N, respectively. The outputs OP and ON of the VLTA 2111 are connected to a terminal 227 of supply voltage Vcc (e.g., +5 V), via inductors 229P and 229N, respectively. The inputs IP and IN of the VLTA 2112 are connected to the bias terminal 221 via resistors 231P and 231N, respectively. The outputs OP and ON of the VLTA 2111 are connected to other inputs AP and AN of the VLTA2, respectively. The outputs OP and ON of the VLTA 2112 are connected to other inputs AN and AP of the VLTA1, respectively. The inputs IP and IN of the VLTA 2112 are connected to the ground terminal via capacitors 233P and 233N, respectively. Each of the capacitors 225N, 225P, 233N and 233P has capacitance Ca. The outputs OP and ON of the VLTA 2112 are connected to the terminal 227 via inductors 235P and 235N, respectively. Peak detection terminals P1 and P2 of the VLTAs 2111 and 2112 are connected to the respective peak detection terminals P1 and P2 of the AGC circuit 213, the AGC terminal of which is connected to AGC terminals of VLTAs 2111 and 2112.

The outputs OP and ON of the VLTA 2111 are defined as "Port 1" and the outputs OP and ON of the VLTA 2112 are defined as "Port 2". The nodal capacitance of the each port is a series of the two capacitances Cc and the two capacitances Ca. The VLTAs 2111 and 2112 are biased through the resistors 223N, 223P and 231N, 231P by the bias voltage Vb1. The VLTAs 2111 and 2112 develop large voltage swings in the inductors 229P, 229N, 235P and 235N. The gain of the VLTA 2111 is the same one as that of the VLTA 2112. A total gain of a loop comprising the VLTAs 2111 and 2112 is greater than unity. Each of the VLTAs 2111 and 2112 has a 90 degree phase shift between its input arid output at a resonant frequency. Quadrature output voltage Vosc1 and Vosc2 are provided from Ports 1 and 2, respectively. The capacitors 225N, 225P, 233N and 233P of the capacitance Cc attenuate the signals at the inputs of the VLTAs 2111 and 2112, so as to avoid overloading the VLTAs.

Figure 10 shows the VLTA which includes a tuner 311 and a variable gain linear amplifier (VGLA) 321. The non-inverting and inverting inputs IP and IN of the VLTA are connected to non-inverting and inverting inputs IP and IN of the VGLA 321, respectively, the non-inverting and inverting outputs OP and ON of which are connected to the non-inverting and inverting outputs OP and ON of the VLTA. Tuning terminals FP and FN of the VGLA 321 are connected to the tuning terminals FP and FN of the tuner 311, the tuning inputs TP and TN are connected to the tuning inputs of the VLTA. The inputs AP and AN of the VLTA are connected to the outputs OP and ON of the tuner 11. The AGC terminals of the tuner 311 and VGLA 321 are connected to the AGC terminal of the VLTA to which AGC voltage Vagc is fed. The tuning inputs TP and TN are provided with differential tuning adjustable voltage Vad (the source of which is not shown). Differential tuning input voltage Vti is fed from the tuning terminals FP and FN of the VGLA 321 to the tuning terminals FP and FN of the tuner 311.

The tuner 311 and the VGLA 321 are combined to create a linear tuning arrangement. This technique is based on the vector summation of the amplifier output current with a variable quadrature feedback signal, so as to alter the transconductor amplifier delay and hence the gyrator frequency.

Figure 11 shows the tuner 311 of Figure 10. The following description assumes, for simplicity and purely by way of example, that the FETs referred to are P-channel MOSFETs (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors) and the transistors referred to are NPN-type bipolar transistors. In Figure 11, the tuner 311 includes two differential amplifier circuits of transistors 411, 413, 415 and a resistor 417 and transistors 421, 423, 425 and a resistor 427. The tuning terminals FP and FN are connected to the bases of the transistors 411, 423 and the bases of the transistors 413, 421, respectively. The non-inverting and inverting outputs OP and ON of the tuner 311 are connected to the collectors of the transistors 411, 421 and the collectors of the transistors 413, 423, respectively. The base of the transistor 415 is connected to the base of a transistor 431, the base and collector of which are connected to series-connected FETs 433, 435.and 437. The emitter of the transistor 431 is connected to the ground terminal via a resistor 439. Similarly, the base of the transistor 425 is connected to the base of a transistor 441, the base and collector of which are connected to series-connected FETs 443, 445 and 447. The emitter of the transistor 441 is connected to the ground terminal via a resistor 449. The tuning inputs TP and TN are connected to the gates of the FETs 443 and 433, respectively. A resistor 451 of resistance RT is connected between the sources of the FETs 433 and 443. The AGC terminal is connected to the base of a transistor 453, the collector of which is connected to series-connected FETs 455 and 457. The emitter of the transistor 453 is connected to the ground terminal via a resistor 459. The sources of the FETs 437, 447 and 457 are connected to a terminal of dc supply voltage Vcc (e.g., +5 volts). The differential tuning adjustable voltage Vad is fed to the gates of the FETs 443 and 433. The differential tuning input voltage Vti is fed to the bases of the transistors 411 and 413 from the collectors of which the differential tuning output current Ito is provided.

The tuner 311 is essentially a four quadrant mixer which multiplies the differential tuning input voltage Vti with the differential tuning adjustable voltage Vad, so as to produce the differential tuning output current Ito having a variable amplitude. The base of the transistor 453 is provided with the AGC voltage Vagc which is also fed to the VGLA 321.

Figure 12 shows the VGLA 321 of Figure 10. In Figure 12, the non-inverting and inverting inputs IP and IN of the VGLA 321 are connected to the bases of transistors 511 and 513, the collectors of which are connected to the emitters of transistors 515 and 517, respectively. The emitter of the transistor 511 is connected to the collector of a transistor 519 and the base of a transistor 521. The emitter of the transistor 513 is connected to the collector of the transistor 521 and the base of the transistor 519. The emitters of the transistors 519 and 521 are connected to the collectors of transistors 523 and 525, respectively, the emitters of which are connected to the ground terminal via resistors 527 and 529, respectively. The bases of the transistors 523 and 525 are connected to a bias terminal 531 to which bias voltage Vb2 is fed. A gain control resistor 533 of resistance RG is connected between the emitters of the transistors 519 and 521. The collectors of the transistors 515 and 517 are connected to the inverting and non-inverting outputs ON and OP of the VGLA 321, respectively, and to the collectors of transistors 535 and 537, respectively. The bases of the transistors 515 and 517 are connected to a bias terminal 539 to which bias voltage Vb3 is fed. The emitters of the transistors 535 and 537 are connected to the collector of a transistor 541, the emitter of which is connected to the ground terminal via a resistor 543. The base of the transistor 541 is connected to the AGC terminal. Each of the voltages Vb2 and Vb3 is fed by a constant voltage source (not shown).

The VGLA 321 is a differential amplifier. The transistors 523 and 525 with the emitter degeneration resistors 527 and 529 operate as current sources. The transistors 515, 517, 535 and 537 operate on the translinear principle. The impedance seen at the emitters of the transistors 515 and 517 is very low, typically a few ohms, since it is the reciprocal of the transconductance of these transistors plus some parasitic resistance. The transconductance of this complete amplifier can be controlled by varying the current sourced into the AGC input.

The transistors 519 and 521 are added in order to make the input amplifier linear. The non-linear characteristic of the positive feedback pair 519 and 521 is the exact opposite of the non-linear characteristic of transistors 511 and 513, thus creating a highly linear amplifier out of transistors 511, 513, 519 and 521. The combination of this linear input amplifier and the linear output amplifier results in that the circuit of Figure 12 is a highly linear high speed variable gain transconductance amplifier. Voltage across the resistor 533 is used by the AGC circuit for peak detection. The voltage (i.e., the differential tuning input voltage Vti) between the tuning terminals FP and FN is used for tuning control.

Figure 13 shows an AGC circuit 213 of Figure 9. In Figure 13, a resistor 611, a diode-connected transistor 613 and a resistor 615 are connected in series between a terminal of the supply voltage Vcc and the ground terminal. The AGC terminal is connected to the collector of the transistor 613 and via a resistor 617 to the collectors of transistors 619, 621, 623 and 625, the emitters of which are connected to the ground terminal. Both the terminals of the resistor 617 are connected to the ground terminal via capacitors 627 and 629.

The AGC circuit 213 includes an offset circuit 630 wherein a resistor 631 and two diode-connected transistors 633 and 635 are connected in series between the Vcc terminal and the ground terminal. The collector of the transistor 633 is connected to the base of a transistor 637, the emitter of which is connected to the ground terminal via series-connected resistors 639 and 641. The collector of the transistor 637 is connected to the Vcc terminal. The junction of the resistors 639 and 641 is connected to an output OFS of the offset circuit 630.

The output OFS is connected to the bases of the transistors 619, 621, 623 and 625 via resistors 643, 645, 647 and 649, respectively. Each of the resistors 643, 645, 647 and 649 has resistance Rb. The bases of the transistors 619 and 621 are connected to the peak detection terminals P1 and P2 of the VGLA 321 of the VLTA 2111 via capacitors 651 and 653, respectively. Similarly, the bases of the transistors 623 and 625 are connected to the peak detection terminals P1 and P2 of the VGLA 321 of the other VLTA 2112 via capacitors 655 and 657, respectively.

The circuit 213 is a typical AGC arrangement to keep the VLTAs 2111 and 2112 operating in the linear region. Under start-up conditions, the resistor 611 supplies current from the supply voltage Vcc to the transistor 613. This establishes the bias AGC voltage Vagc which is fed to the transistor 453 of the tuner 311 and the transistor 541 of the VGLA 321. Once the oscillator signal reaches the required amplitude, the remaining circuit of the AGC circuit 213 reduces the AGC bias voltage as described below.

The transistors 619, 621, 623 and 625 operate as peak detectors. The resistors 643, 645, 647 and 649 permit a bias voltage to be presented to the transistors 619, 621, 623 and 625, so as to bias these transistors off by a predetermined offset voltage Vos derived from the offset circuit 630. If the emitter current density in the transistors 633, 635 and 637 is the same, then the offset voltage Vos will be given by: Vos = Vbe x Rdiv Where Vbe is the base-emitter voltage of the transistors. Rdiv is a voltage division ratio which is given by: Rdiv = R641 / (R639 + R641) Where R639 and R641 are the resistances of the resistors 639 and 641, respectively. The offset voltage Vos has a negative temperature coefficient which is the same as that of a semiconductor diode: i.e., approximately - 0.002 x Rdiv v/C . In order to cancel the negative temperature coefficient, and maintain a constant oscillator output voltage level, it is necessary to increase the emitter current density of the transistor 637 relative to that of the transistors 633 and 635. This will create an additional offset voltage at the output OFS of the offset circuit 630 with a positive temperature coefficient. This is an application of the band gap principle used in band gap voltage generators. Finally one also has to take into account the ratio of the peak emitter current density in the transistors 619, 621, 623 and 625 relative to the transistor 635, and typically this would be made unity to avoid any additional temperature effects in the oscillator output level. It has been assumed in this description that the temperature coefficient of the resistance of the resistor 631 is zero. If this is not true, its effect can be cancelled by modifying the emitter current density ratio in the transistors 637 and 633 in conjunction with the ratio Rdiv.

In a typical arrangement, a 5.9 GHz oscillator with 5 Vp-p differential quadrature outputs can be obtained with this oscillator. The supply voltage must be at least 5 V relative to ground potential. Values of the capacitors in Figure 9 are as follows: Cc = 0.5 pF Ca = 1.5 pF

The capacitor attenuator is thus 3:1 and a 2.5 volts single ended swing at the output creates a 0.83 volt single ended swing at the input.

For the differential amplifier to operate in its linear range, the value of the resistor RG multiplied by the current sunk in transistors 523, 525 must exceed 2 volts. This is controlled by the bias voltage Vb2. In this design, RG is 1 kΩ and the current sink is 2 mA. The AGC limited the output to 2.6 Vp-p, or 5.2 V differential peak-peak. The value of the inductors is 2 nH with a Q factor of 6.4 at 5.9 GHz. The resistances of the bias resistors 527, 529 and 543 are 10 kΩ and the bias voltage Vb1 is 2.2 V. The bias voltage Vb3 is 3 V.

Particular advantages of this embodiment are:

  • use of a capacitor divider circuit avoids delay in the coupled signal so as to obtain maximum oscillator frequency and the capacitors perform a dual function as the gyrator capacitors. In addition the capacitors increase the efficiency of the VCO over that using a resistor attenuator;
  • the large signal swing output increases the carrier to noise ratio and so reduces the phase noise;
  • the inductors inductance and quality factor are chosen for ease of practical implementation at the oscillator frequency. Also since the function of the inductor is to partially cancel. the gyrator capacitance, relatively large capacitors are used which swamp the non-linearities due to the transistor parasitic capacitance.

Due to the low impedance presented by the shunt capacitors Ca at the input of the amplifiers, and the relatively large input signal, the noise performance of the amplifiers is good.

II-3. Second Embodiment

Figure 14 shows another embodiment including Miller feedback capacitors 8111, 8112, 8113 and 8114 which are connected between the respective non-inverting or inverting output and the inverting or non-inverting input of the VLTAs. The capacitors 8111, 8112, 8113 and 8114 are employed to further linearize the gyrator.

II-4. Limitations of the First and Second Embodiment Gyrators

The first and second embodiment gyrators are disclosed in pending United States Application Serial Number 09/056,711 filed by the same inventor on April 8, 1998. In the gyrator, the advantages of inductive loads for such gyrators are exploited. Specific improvements using inductive loads include, larger amplitude signals, extended high frequency performance, lower harmonic distortion with consequential improved phase noise and discrimination against power supply noise. It has been found however, that the improved gyrator has a practical limitation imposed by the response time of the automatic output level control. In the gyrator, the use of inductive loads required that the inductance should be large enough that the inductive admittance is less than the capacitive admittance of the gyrator nodal capacitors. If this condition is met, the inductive admittance will partially cancel the capacitive admittance. The overall nodal impedance is a reduced capacitive reactance and this reduced capacitive reactance permits the oscillator, for example, to oscillate at higher frequencies. The resultant oscillator frequency is higher than the resonant frequency of the parallel combination of the inductive load and the nodal capacitance. Such a gyrator, with inductive loads has the capability of oscillating at the gyrator resonant frequency, or alternatively, at the resonant frequency of the parallel combination of the inductive load and nodal capacitance. To be more precise, at the gyrator resonant frequency, the reduced nodal capacitance of one node appears as a parallel inductance to the reduced nodal capacitance of the other node and the quality factor of this resonant combination can be at least as high as 250. On the other hand, the quality factor of integrated inductors can be typically 3. Thus the quality factor of the gyrator resonant circuit is about two orders of magnitude greater than the quality factor of the resonant combination of inductive load and nodal capacitance. Under normal operation, the gyrator chooses to oscillate at the resonant frequency with the higher quality factor. However, under some circumstances, where the oscillation is allowed to increase beyond the normal linear range of the gyrator, increased harmonic distortion lowers the gyrator quality factor and spurious oscillations at the frequency of the resonant combination of inductive load and nodal capacitance can result. An example of such a possibility occurs when the gyrator is rapidly tuned from one frequency to another. Under these circumstances, large changes in the loop gain of the gyrator can occur, causing the amplitude to overshoot the linear region and allowing spurious oscillations to build up. To prevent this spurious operation in the first and second embodiment gyrators, it is necessary to limit the rapidity with which the gyrator is tuned. In practice, this imposes a limit on the bandwidth of the filter of a phase locked loop, or similar application of the gyrator.

III. Third Embodiment Gyrator

A third embodiment gyrator with inductive loads removes the limitations of the first and second embodiment gyrators.

Referring to Figure 15 which shows a gyrator according to another embodiment of the present invention, the gyrator includes two transconductance amplifiers 901, 902, each having non-inverting and inverting inputs and outputs. The non-inverting and inverting output terminals OP and ON of the transconductance amplifier 901 are connected to the non-inverting and inverting input terminals IP and IN of the transconductance amplifier 902, respectively. The non-inverting and inverting output terminals OP and ON of the transconductance amplifier 902 are connected to the inverting and non-inverting input terminals IN and IP of the transconductance amplifier 901, respectively.

The possibility of separating the AGC circuit from the tuning control arises. out of the properties of a translinear amplifier. The output stage of the gyrator variable linear transconductance amplifiers is a translinear amplifier. In the above mentioned gyrator, the transconductance is varied by variation of the tail current of the output differential pair. However, the tuning arrangement also employed two additional differential pairs whose inputs are connected in parallel with the output differential pair, and whose outputs are arranged as quadrature feedback signals to the alternate gyrator output. For tuning purposes the tail currents of the quadrature differential pairs is varied. Control of the transconductance also required that the tail currents of the quadrature differential pairs should be varied. The resultant tuning circuit of Figure 11 requires both tuning control signals as well as AGC control.

Referring to Figure 16 which shows the transconductance amplifier used in the gyrator, AGC control of the tail currents of the output differential pair and the tuning quadrature differential pairs is eliminated, so that the bias current of the output differential pair is fixed and the tuning control is much simpler.

Each of the transconductance amplifiers 901, 902 includes a tuning amplifier 911, a transadmittance amplifier 912 and a translinear amplifier 913 which are cascaded between a terminal 227 of supply voltage Vcc (e.g., +5 V) and the ground terminal via transistors 915, 916. The tuning amplifier 911 has non-inverting and inverting input terminals 917 and 918 which are connected to the collectors of transistors 919, 920 and 921, 922, respectively. The emitters of the transistors 919, 921 are connected to the collector of a transistor 923, the emitter of which is connected to the ground terminal via a resistor 924. The emitters of the transistors 920, 922 are connected to the emitter of a transistor 925, the emitter of which is connected to the ground terminal via a resistor 926. The bases of the transistors 919, 922 and 921, 920 are connected to the emitter of transistors 927 and 928, respectively, of the translinear amplifier 913. The emitters of the transistors 927, 928 are connected to the bases of transistors 929, 930, the emitters of which are connected to the ground terminal via a resistor 931. The bases of the transistors 927, 928 are connected to a bias input terminal 932 of bias voltage Vb3. The collectors of the transistors 927, 928 are connected to the Vcc voltage terminal. The collectors of the transistors 929, 930 are connected to the voltage terminal via inductors 933, 934, respectively. The collectors of the transistors 929 and 930 are non-inverting and inverting output terminals OP and ON of the transconductance amplifiers 901 and 902 of Figure 15. The bases of the transistors 922, 920 of the tuning amplifier 911 are connected to the collectors of transistors 935, 936 of the transadmittance amplifier 912, respectively. The emitters of the transistors 935, 936 are connected to the collectors of transistors 937, 938, the emitters of which are connected to the collectors of the transistors 915, 916, respectively. The bases of the transistors 937, 938 are connected to the collectors of the transistors 938, 937. The bases of the transistors 935, 936 are connected to each other via series-connected resistors 939, 940. The emitters of the transistors 937, 938 are connected to each other via a resistor 941. Series-connected capacitors 942, 943 are connected between the non-inverting input terminal 917 and the ground terminal. Series-connected capacitors 944, 945 are connected between the inverting input terminal 918 and the ground terminal. The joints of the capacitors 942, 943 and 944, 945 are connected to the bases of the transistors 936 and 935, respectively. The bases of the transistors 915, 916 are connected to a bias terminal 946 of bias voltage Vb1.

The current gain of the translinear amplifier 913 is equal to the ratio of the input and output bias currents. The gain of the translinear amplifier 913 is decreased by increasing the bias current of the input signal of the translinear amplifier 913.

The input stage of the gyrator variable transconductance amplifier is a linear transadmittance amplifier which employs positive feedback of transistors 937, 938 to compensate for the non-linearity of transistors 935, 936. The actual gain of this transadmittance amplifier is fixed by the value of resistor R4. Thus, the gain of the transadmittance amplifier is independent of the bias current supplied by transistors 915, 916. However increasing the bias current of the transadmittance amplifier 912 permits it to handle larger signals without over-loading the amplifier. It is desireable therefore, that as the oscillation signals build up in amplitude, that the bias current of the transadmittance amplifier 912 should be increased.

It will be observed that the same bias current output from the transadmittance amplifier 912 is the input bias current for the translinear amplifier 913. Automatic gain control requires that as the oscillation signals increase in amplitude, the input bias current of this translinear amplifier 913 be increased. The combined circuit of the transadmittance and translinear amplifiers 912 and 913 therefore exhibits the desirable property that the bias current of the transadmittance amplifier 912 can be increased both to accommodate increasing oscillation amplitudes and to limit these amplitudes by lowering the gain of the translinear amplifier 913. The operation of the gyrator transconductance amplifiers 901, 902 is thus optimized. Finally, since the bias current of the output differential pairs of the translinear amplifier 913 is now independent of the gain control function, it can be fixed and optimized for optimum performance of the output transistors. This latter property is desirable since by biasing the output differential pair close to the optimum for maximum gain-bandwidth product (fT) the transistor size can be chosen for minimum parasitic capacitance resulting in either maximum linearity, or maximum oscillator frequency, or a combination of both.

Figure 17 shows a peak detector. In Figure 17, the base of a transistor 951 is connected to the oscillator buffered output terminal via a capacitor 952. The collector of the transistor 951 is connected to the collector of a diode-connected transistor 953, the base of which is connected to the base of a transistor 954. The emitters of the transistors 953, 954 are connected to the Vcc voltage terminal. Resistors 955, 956 are connected between the collector and emitter of the transistors 953, 954, respectively. The emitter of the transistor 951 is connected to the ground terminal via a capacitor 957 and a diode-connected transistor 958. The emitter of a transistor 959 is connected to the ground terminal via series-connected resistors 960, 961 for adjusting the threshold of peak detection. The joint of the resistors 960, 961 is connected to the base of the transistor 951. The collector of the transistor 959 is connected to the voltage terminal. A resistor 962 and two diode-connected transistors 963, 964 are connected in series between the voltage terminal and the ground terminal. The base of the transistor 959 is connected to the collector of the transistor 963. The base of the transistor 964 is connected to the base of a transistor 965, the emitter of which is connected to the ground terminal. The emitters of the transistor 951, and the collectors of the transistors 954, 958, 965 are connected to the bias terminal 946 of the bias voltage Vb1 of the transconductance amplifier shown in Figure 16.

Figure 18 shows an output buffer and bias circuit used in the transconductance amplifier. In Figure 18, the bases of emitter follower transistors 967, 968 are connected via capacitors 969, 970, to the collectors of the transistors 930, 929 of the transconductance amplifier of Figure 16. The emitters of the transistors 967, 968 are connected to the bases of transistors 971, 972, the emitters of which are to be used as buffered outputs of the oscillator. The bases of the transistors 967, 968 are connected to each other via series-connected resistors 973, 974, the junction of which is connected to a terminal of dc supply voltage Vcc (e.g., +5 volts) via a diode-connected transistor 975 and to the ground terminal via a series-connected resistor 976 and diode-connected transistor 977. The emitters of the transistors 967, 968 are connected to the bases of transistors 978, 979, the collectors of which are connected to the Vcc terminal via resistors 980, 981. The emitter of the transistor 978 is connected to the emitter of the transistor 979 via a resistor 982. The collectors of the transistors 971, 967, 968 and 972 are connected to the Vcc terminal. The emitters of the transistors 971, 967, 968,972, 978 and 979 are connected to the ground terminal via transistors 983, 984, 985, 986, 987 and 988, respectively. Two diode-connected transistors 989, 990 and a transistor 991 are connected in series between the Vcc terminal and the ground terminal. The bases of the transistors 983, 984, 977, 986, 987, 988 and 991 are connected to a bias voltage source, formed by transistors 975, 985 and resistor 976, to provide bias currents necessary to their connected transistors. The collector of the transistor 978 is connected to the capacitor 952 of the peak detector shown in Figure 17. The emitter of the transistor 990 is connected to the junction of the resistors 939, 940 of the transconductance amplifier shown in Figure 16 to supply the bias voltage Vb2, which is the voltage difference between the supply voltage Vcc and the collector-emitter voltages Vce of the two transistors 989 and 990. The emitter of the transistor 989 is connected to the terminal 932 of the transconductance amplifier shown in Figure 16 to supply the bias voltage Vb3, which is the voltage difference between the supply voltage Vcc and the collector-emitter voltage Vce of the transistor 989.

The requirement for the peak detector is that it respond rapidly to changes in signal amplitude, increasing the bias current to the input of the translinear amplifier 913 as the signal level increases. This is accomplished by using emitter followers that become conducting once the signal level exceeds a given amplitude. In the peak detector circuit of Figure 17, the transistor 951 represents one such emitter follower. The capacitor 952, the transistor 951 and the resistors 960, 961 are multiplicated four times to service the four outputs of the oscillator. The emitter current of the transistor 951 is passed directly to the bias circuit of the transadmittance amplifiers 912 and so controls the gain of the translinear amplifiers 913. The response time of the peak detector is very fast due to the short response time of the emitter followers. The attack and decay times of the peak detector circuit for a 2.5 GHz oscillator are typically of the order of 1 nanosecond or less. As a result the gyrator transconductance amplifiers 901, 902 always operate in the linear region and so prevent operation at spurious frequencies. Changes in the emitter current of the emitter followers as they follow the peaks of the oscillation are reflected in changes in the base emitter voltage of these transistors. As a result, the ability of the peak detector to control the oscillation peaks is subject to some variance. For example, over the tuning range of the oscillator the bias current may vary by a factor of 3, causing a variation in the emitter follower base emitter voltage. In order to enable tighter control of the oscillator signal, the collector current of the emitter follower transistor 951 can be used in conjunction with a high gain PNP mirror formed of the transistors 953, 954 to add a second, slower, high gain bias control. As a result, the peak detector contains two control loops, the first a fast acting loop for oscillator stability control and the second a slower control loop for fine adjustment of the oscillator output level. In accordance with an object of this invention, the resulting fast acting automatic level control permits the oscillator to be tuned over its entire range in less than 10 ns, without any instability or spurious oscillations.

An added feature of the peak detector circuit of Figure 17 is the additional transistor 965, the function of which is to remove power supply dependency from the oscillator. If the resistors 956 and 962 have the same resistance and the transistors 963, 964, 965 and 958 all have the same size, the current I958 through the diode connected transistor 958 will be given by: I958 = Vbe/R962 Where Vbe is a voltage between the base-emitter of the transistors 963, 964, 965 and 958 and R962 is a resistance of the resistor 962. Thus, the current I958 is independent of the supply voltage Vcc. Clearly the sizes of the resistor 962 admittance and the transistors 963 and 964 can be reduced proportionately without impairing the ability to resist bias variations due to the power supply.

Simulated performance of the gyrator shows that the frequency changes 1% for a 0.5 volt variation of the supply voltage.

Specific improvements include:

  • (i) simplification of the AGC circuit and the tuning control by separation of these two functions;
  • (ii) reduction of the tuning circuit of Figure 11 from a total of 17 transistors to 6;
  • (iii) reduction of the time constant of the AGC circuit by more than an order of magnitude; and
  • (iv) reduction of the influence of the power supply voltage on the AGC and bias circuit of the oscillator.

Although particular embodiments of the present invention have been described in detail, it should be appreciated that numerous variations, modifications, and adaptations may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention as defined in the claims. For example, the channel types of the FETs and the types of the bipolar transistors may inverse.


Anspruch[de]
  1. Gyrator, der einen Resonanzkreis bildet, mit:
    • einer Schleife, die Ports 1 und 2 aufweist, wobei jeder Port zwei Anschlüsse aufweist, wobei die Schleife in Schleife geschaltete erste und zweite Verstärker umfasst, wobei die Verstärkung der Schleife größer als Eins ist;
    • eine kapazitive Einrichtung zum Koppeln der Anschlüsse der jeweiligen Ports, wodurch eine effektive Knotenkapazität an jedem Port und eine effektive Knoteninduktivität in dem anderen Port hervorgerufen wird, wobei die Kapazität und die Induktivität die Resonanzfrequenz des Gyrators bestimmen; und
    • eine induktive Einrichtung zum Koppeln der Anschlüsse der jeweiligen Ports mit der Versorgungsspannung, wodurch die effektive Knotenkapazität an dem jeweiligen Port geändert wird.
  2. Gyrator nach Anspruch 1, bei dem die kapazitive Einrichtung kapazitive Elemente umfasst, die jeweils zwischen den Anschlüssen jedes Ports angeschaltet sind.
  3. Gyrator nach Anspruch 1, bei dem die kapazitive Einrichtung kapazitive Elemente umfasst, die jeweils zwischen dem Anschluss eines Ports und dem jeweiligen Anschluss des anderen Ports eingeschaltet sind.
  4. Gyrator nach Anspruch 1, bei dem die induktive Einrichtung induktive Elemente umfasst, die jeweils zwischen dem jeweiligen Anschluss des Ports und der Versorgungsspannung eingeschaltet sind.
  5. Gyrator nach Anspruch 1, bei dem
    • die kapazitive Einrichtung Kapazitätselemente umfasst, die jeweils zwischen den Anschlüssen jedes Ports angeschaltet sind; und
    • die induktive Einrichtung Induktivitätselemente umfasst, die jeweils zwischen dem jeweiligen Anschluss des Ports und der Versorgungsschaltung eingeschaltet sind.
  6. Gyrator nach Anspruch 5, bei dem das Kapazitätselement einen diskreten Kondensator umfasst, wobei die induktive Einrichtung eine Verringerung der effektiven Knotenkapazität in jedem Port hervorruft, so dass der Gyrator mit einer Frequenz schwingen kann, die höher als die Resonanzfrequenz ist.
  7. Gyrator nach Anspruch 5, bei dem das Kapazitätselement eine parasitäre Kapazität und einen zusätzlichen diskreten Kondensator umfasst, wobei der letzere die Verringerung der effektiven Knotenkapazität durch das Induktivitätselement in jedem Port kompensiert, so dass der Gyrator in der Lage ist, mit einer Frequenz zu schwingen, die ähnlich der Resonanzfrequenz ohne die zusätzlichen kapazitiven und induktiven Elemente ist.
  8. Gyrator nach Anspruch 5, bei dem das Kapazitätselement einen diskreten Kondensator und einen zusätzlichen diskreten Kondensator umfasst, wobei die induktive Einrichtung eine Verringerung der effektiven Knotenkapazität in jedem Port hervorruft, so dass der Gyrator mit einer Frequenz schwingen kann, die höher als die Resonanzfrequenz ist.
  9. Gyrator nach Anspruch 1, bei dem:
    • die ersten und zweiten Verstärker der Schleife erste bzw. zweite Differenzverstärker (2111, 2112) umfassen, wobei jeder Differenzverstärker invertierende und nicht invertierende Eingänge und Ausgänge (IP, IN, OP, ON) aufweist,
       wobei die Schleife Verstärker-Kopplungseinrichtungen zum Koppeln der invertierenden und nicht invertierenden Ausgänge des ersten Differenzverstärkers mit den nicht invertierenden bzw. invertierenden Eingängen des zweiten Differenzverstärkers und zum Koppeln der invertierenden und nicht invertierenden Ausgänge des zweiten Differenzverstärkers mit den invertierenden bzw. nicht invertierenden Eingängen des ersten Differenzverstärkers umfasst, wobei die Verstärkung der Schleife mit den ersten und zweiten Differenzverstärkern größer als Eins ist,

       wobei jeder der ersten und zweiten Differenzverstärker eine Phasenverschiebung von allgemein 90° zwischen seinem Eingang und Ausgang bei der Resonanzfrequenz hat.
  10. Gyrator nach Anspruch 9, bei dem die Verstärker-Kopplungseinrichtung kapazitive Kopplungseinrichtungen (Ca) zum kapazitiven Koppeln der Ausgänge des Differenzverstärkers mit den jeweiligen Eingängen des anderen Verstärkers umfasst.
  11. Gyrator nach Anspruch 10, bei dem die kapazitive Kopplungseinrichtung vier Kapazitätselemente (2171, 2172, 2191, 2192) umfasst, die jeweils einen der Ausgänge des Differenzverstärkers mit dem jeweiligen Eingang des anderen Verstärkers koppeln.
  12. Gyrator nach Anspruch 9, bei dem jeder der ersten und zweiten Differenzverstärker einen eine veränderliche Transkonduktanz aufweisenden Verstärker umfasst.
  13. Gyrator nach Anspruch 12, der weiterhin eine Verstärkungssteuereinrichtung (213) umfasst, um zu bewirken, dass der veränderbare Transkonduktanz-Verstärker als veränderbare lineare Transkonduktanz-Verstärker arbeitet.
  14. Gyrator nach Anspruch 13, bei dem der variable Transkonduktanz-Verstärker eine veränderbare Verstärkung aufweisende Verstärkereinrichtungen (321) umfasst, deren Verstärkung linear durch die Verstärkungs-Regeleinrichtungen gesteuert wird.
  15. Gyrator nach Anspruch 14, bei dem der eine veränderliche Verstärkung aufweisende Verstärker (321) Folgendes umfasst:
    • erste und zweite Stromquellen (523, 525, 527, 529),
    • ein Differenzpaar mit ersten und zweiten Transistoren (511, 513), deren Basen mit den invertierenden und nicht invertierenden Eingängen des Differenzverstärkers gekoppelt sind;
    • ein Kompensationspaar von dritten und vierten Transistoren (519, 521), wobei der Kollektor, die Basis und der Emitter des dritten Transistors mit dem Emitter des ersten Transistors, mit dem Emitter des zweiten Transistors bzw. mit der ersten Stromquelle gekoppelt sind, wobei der Kollektor, die Basis und der Emitter des vierten Transistors mit dem Emitter des zweiten Transistors, mit dem Emitter des ersten Transistors bzw. mit der zweiten Stromquelle gekoppelt ist;
    • ein Widerstandselement (533), das zwischen den Emittern der dritten und vierten Transistoren eingeschaltet ist;
    • ein aktives Widerstandspaar aus fünften und sechsten Transistoren (515, 517), wobei die Emitter der fünften und sechsten Transistoren mit den Kollektoren der ersten und zweiten Transistoren verbunden sind und die Kollektoren der fünften und sechsten Transistoren mit den invertierenden und nicht invertierenden Ausgängen des Differenzverstärkers verbunden sind;
    • ein Verstärkungssteuerpaar aus siebten und achten Transistoren (537, 535), deren Kollektoren mit den Kollektoren des sechsten bzw. fünften Transistors verbunden sind, wobei die Basen der siebten und achten Transistoren mit dem Emitter der fünften bzw. sechsten Transistoren verbunden sind; und
    • einen neunten Transistor (541), dessen Kollektor mit den Emittern der siebten und achten Transistoren verbunden ist, so dass die Verstärkung des veränderbaren Transkonduktanz-Verstärkers in Abhängigkeit von einer Verstärkungssteuerspannung gesteuert wird, die der Basis des neunten Transistors zugeführt wird.
  16. Gyrator nach Anspruch 15, bei dem die Verstärkungs-Regeleinrichtung Detektoreinrichtungen zur Erzeugung der Verstärkungs-Regelspannung in Abhängigkeit von den Differenzsignalen umfasst, die von dem eine variable Transkonduktanz aufweisenden Verstärker geliefert werden, wobei jedes Differenzsignal längs des Widerstandselementes hervorgerufen wird.
  17. Gyrator nach Anspruch 16, bei dem die Verstärkungs-Regeleinrichtung Einrichtungen zur Feststellung des Spitzenwertes des Differenzsignals umfasst, um die Verstärkungs-Regelspannung zu erzeugen, die automatisch die Verstärkung der ersten und zweiten Differenz-Verstärkung regelt.
  18. Gyrator nach Anspruch 15 oder 16, bei dem der eine veränderbare Transkonduktanz aufweisende Verstärker weiterhin Abstimmeinrichtungen zum Abstimmen mit einer Differenzspannung zwischen den Kollektoren der dritten und vierten Transistoren umfasst.
  19. Gyrator nach Anspruch 18, bei dem die Abstimmeinrichtung zwei Differenz-Verstärker umfasst, die jeweils ein Paar von Transistoren und eine Stromquelle umfassen, wobei die zwei Differenz-Verstärker so gekoppelt sind, dass sie Quadrantensignale erzeugen, wobei die Verstärkung der Differenz-Verstärker in Abhängigkeit von der Verstärkungssteuerspannung geändert wird.
  20. Gyrator nach Anspruch 19, bei dem die Abstimmeinrichtung weiterhin Einrichtungen zur Veränderung der Verstärkung der Abstimmeinrichtungen in Abhängigkeit von der Verstärkungs-Regelspannung umfasst.
  21. Gyrator nach Anspruch 16, bei dem die Detektoreinrichtung Transistoreinrichtungen zur Feststellung des Spitzenwertsignals und Vorspanneinrichtungen zur Zuführung einer Vorspannung an die Transistoreinrichtungen umfasst.
  22. Gyrator nach Anspruch 21, bei dem die Vorspanneinrichtung Spannungseinrichtungen zur Erzeugung der Vorspannung umfasst, die in den Transistoreinrichtungen temperaturkompensiert ist.
  23. Gyrator nach Anspruch 22, bei dem die Spannungseinrichtungen Transistoren umfassen, deren sich mit der Temperatur ändernden Koeffizienten an die der Transistoreinrichtungen angepasst sind.
  24. Gyrator nach Anspruch 18, bei dem der eine veränderbare Transkonduktanz aufweisende Verstärker weiterhin Lasten umfasst, wobei die Verstärker in ihrem linearen Bereich arbeiten.
  25. Gyrator nach Anspruch 18, bei dem der veränderbare Transkonduktanz-Verstärker weiterhin automatische Verstärkungsregeleinrichtungen umfasst, die elektrisch von den Abstimmeinrichtungen getrennt sind.
Anspruch[en]
  1. A gyrator forming a resonant circuit comprising:
    • a loop having ports 1 and 2, each port having two terminals, the loop comprising loop-connected first and second amplifiers, the gain of the loop being more than unity;
    • capacitive means for coupling the terminals of the respective ports, thereby causing effective nodal capacitance in each port and effective nodal inductance in the other port, the capacitance and inductance determining the resonant frequency of the gyrator; and
    • inductive means for coupling the terminals of the respective ports to the supply voltage thereby varying the effective nodal capacitance in the respective port.
  2. The gyrator of claim 1, wherein the capacitive means comprises capacitance elements, each being connected between the terminals of each port.
  3. The gyrator of claim 1, wherein the capacitive means comprises capacitance elements, each being connected between the terminal of one port and the respective terminal of the other port.
  4. The gyrator of claim 1, wherein the inductive means comprises inductance elements, each being connected between the respective terminal of the port and the supply voltage.
  5. The gyrator of claim 1, wherein
    • the capacitive means comprises capacitance elements, each being connected between the terminals of each port; and
    • the inductive means comprises inductance elements, each being connected between the respective terminal of the port and the supply voltage.
  6. The gyrator of claim 5, wherein the capacitance element comprises a discrete capacitor, wherein the inductive means causes a reduction in the effective nodal capacitance in each port, so that the gyrator is capable of oscillating at a frequency higher than the resonant frequency.
  7. The gyrator of claim 5, wherein the capacitance element comprises a parasitic capacitance and an additional discrete capacitor, wherein the latter compensates the reduction in the effective nodal capacitance by the inductance element in each port, so that the gyrator is capable of oscillating at a frequency similar to the resonant frequency without the additional capacitive and inductive elements.
  8. The gyrator of claim 5, wherein the capacitance element comprises a discrete capacitor and an additional discrete capacitor, wherein the inductive means causes a reduction in the effective nodal capacitance in each port, so that the gyrator is capable of oscillating at a frequency higher than the resonant frequency.
  9. The gyrator of claim 1, wherein:
    • first and second amplifiers of the loop comprise first and second differential amplifiers (2111, 2121) respectively, each differential amplifier having inverting and non-inverting inputs and outputs (IP, IN, OP, ON),
    • the loop comprises amplifier coupling means for coupling the inverting and non-inverting outputs of the first differential amplifier to the non-inverting and inverting inputs of the second differential amplifier, respectively, and for coupling the inverting and non-inverting outputs of the second differential amplifier to the inverting and non-inverting inputs of the first differential amplifier, respectively, the gain of the loop comprising the first and second differential amplifiers being greater than unity,
       wherein each of the first and second differential amplifiers has a generally 90 degree phase shift between its input and output at the resonant frequency.
  10. The gyrator of claim 9, wherein the amplifier coupling means comprises capacitive-coupling means (6) for capacitively coupling the outputs of the differential amplifiers to the respective inputs of the other amplifier.
  11. The gyrator of claim 10, wherein the capacitive-coupling means comprises four capacitance elements (2171, 2172, 2191, 2192), each coupling one of the outputs of the differential amplifiers to the respective input of the other amplifier.
  12. The gyrator of claim 9, wherein each of the first and second differential amplifiers comprises a variable transconductance amplifier.
  13. The gyrator of claim 12, further comprising gain control means (213) for causing the variable transconductance amplifier to operate as a variable linear transconductance amplifier.
  14. The gyrator of claim 13, wherein the variable transconductance amplifier comprises variable gain amplifier means (321) the gain of which is linearly controlled by the gain control means.
  15. The gyrator of claim 14, wherein the variable gain amplifier (321) comprises:
    • first and second current sources (523, 525, 527, 529),
    • a differential pair of first and second transistors (511, 513), the bases of which are coupled to the inverting and non-inverting inputs of the differential amplifier;
    • a compensation pair of third and fourth transistors (511, 513), the collector, base and emitter of the third transistor being connected to the emitter of the first transistor, the emitter of the second transistor and the first current source, respectively, the collector, base and emitter of the fourth transistor being connected to the emitter of the second transistor, the emitter of the first transistor and the second current source, respectively;
    • a resistance element (533) connected between the emitters of the third and fourth transistors;
    • an active resistance pair of fifth and sixth transistors (515, 517), the emitters of the fifth and sixth transistors being connected to the collectors of the first and second transistors, the collectors of the fifth and sixth transistors being connected to the inverting and non-inverting outputs of the differential amplifier.
    • a gain control pair of seventh and eighth transistors (537, 535), the collectors of which are connected to the collectors of the sixth and fifth transistors, respectively, the bases of the seventh and eighth transistors being connected to the emitters of the fifth and sixth transistors, respectively; and
    • a ninth transistor (541), the collector of which is connected to the emitters of the seventh and eighth transistors, so that the gain of the variable transconductance amplifier is controlled in response to a gain control voltage fed to the base of the ninth transistor.
  16. The gyrator of claim 15, wherein the gain control means comprises detection means for producing the gain control voltage in response to the differential signals fed from the variable transconductance amplifiers, each differential signal being caused across the resistance element.
  17. The gyrator of claim 16, wherein the gain control means comprises means for detecting the peak of the differential signal to produce the gain control voltage which automatically controls the gain of the first and second differential amplifiers.
  18. The gyrator of claim 15 or 16, wherein the variable transconductance amplifier further comprises tuning means for tuning with differential voltage between the collectors of the third and fourth transistors.
  19. The gyrator of claim 18, wherein the tuning means comprises two differential amplifiers, each comprising a pair of transistors and a current source, the two differential amplifiers being coupled, so as to produce quadrant signals, the gain of the differential amplifiers being varied in response to the gain control voltage.
  20. The gyrator of claim 19, wherein the tuning means further comprises means for varying the gain of the tuning means in response to the gain control voltage.
  21. The gyrator of claim 16, wherein the detection means comprises transistor means for detecting the peak signal and bias means for feeding bias voltage to the transistor means.
  22. The gyrator of claim 21, wherein the bias means comprises voltage means for producing the bias voltage which is temperature-compensated in the transistor means.
  23. The gyrator of claim 22, wherein the voltage means comprises transistors whose temperature-varying coefficients match that of the transistor means.
  24. The gyrator of claim 18, wherein the variable transconductance amplifier further comprises loads, the amplifiers being operative in the linear region thereof.
  25. The gyrator of claim 18, wherein the variable transconductance amplifier further comprises automatic gain control means which is electrically separated from the tuning means.
Anspruch[fr]
  1. Un gyrateur formant un circuit résonant, comprenant :
    • une boucle ayant des accès 1 et 2, chaque accès ayant deux bornes, la boucle comprenant des premier et second amplificateurs connectés en boucle, le gain de la boucle étant supérieur à l'unité;
    • un moyen capacitif pour coupler les bornes des accès respectifs, pour établir ainsi une capacité nodale effective dans chaque accès et une inductance nodale effective dans l'autre accès, la capacité et l'inductance déterminant la fréquence de résonance du gyrateur; et
    • un moyen inductif pour coupler les bornes des accès respectifs à la tension d'alimentation, pour ainsi faire varier la capacité nodale effective à l'accès respectif.
  2. Le gyrateur de la revendication 1, dans lequel le moyen capacitif comprend des éléments capacitifs, chacun d'eux étant connecté entre les bornes de chaque accès.
  3. Le gyrateur de la revendication 1, dans lequel le moyen capacitif comprend des éléments capacitifs, chacun d'eux étant connecté entre la borne d'un accès et la borne respective de l'autre accès.
  4. Le gyrateur de la revendication 1, dans lequel le moyen inductif comprend des éléments inductifs. chacun d'eux étant connecté entre la borne respective de l'accès et la tension d'alimentation.
  5. Le gyrateur de la revendication 1, dans lequel
    • le moyen capacitif comprend des éléments capacitifs, chacun d'eux étant connecté entre les bornes de chaque accès; et
    • le moyen inductif comprend des éléments inductifs, chacun d'eux étant connecté entre la borne respective de l'accès et la tension d'alimentation.
  6. Le gyrateur de la revendication 5, dans lequel l'élément capacitif comprend un condensateur discret, dans lequel le moyen inductif occasionne une réduction de la capacité nodale effective dans chaque accès, de façon que le gyrateur soit capable d'osciller à une fréquence supérieure à la fréquence de résonance.
  7. Le gyrateur de la revendication 5, dans lequel l'élément capacitif comprend une capacité parasite et un condensateur discret supplémentaire, dans lequel ce dernier compense la réduction de la capacité nodale effective par l'élément inductif dans chaque accès, de façon que le gyrateur soit capable d'osciller à une fréquence similaire à la fréquence de résonance, sans les éléments capacitif et inductif supplémentaires.
  8. Le gyrateur de la revendication 5, dans lequel l'élément capacitif comprend un condensateur discret et un condensateur discret supplémentaire, dans lequel le moyen inductif occasionne une réduction de la capacité nodale effective dans chaque accès, de façon que le gyrateur soit capable d'osciller à une fréquence supérieure à la fréquence de résonance.
  9. Le gyrateur de la revendication 1, dans lequel :
    • des premier et second amplificateurs de la boucle comprennent respectivement des premier et second amplificateurs différentiels (2111, 2121), chaque amplificateur différentiel ayant des entrées et des sorties inverseuses et non inverseuses (IP, IN, OP, ON),
    • la boucle comprend un moyen de couplage d'amplificateurs pour coupler les sorties inverseuse et non inverseuse du premier amplificateur différentiel aux entrées non inverseuse et inverseuse du second amplificateur différentiel, respectivement, et pour coupler les sorties inverseuse et non inverseuse du second amplificateur différentiel aux entrées inverseuse et non inverseuse du premier amplificateur différentiel, respectivement, le gain de la boucle comprenant les premier et second amplificateurs différentiels étant supérieur à l'unité,
       dans lequel chacun des premier et second amplificateurs différentiels a de façon générale un déphasage de 90 degrés entre son entrée et sa sortie à la fréquence de résonance.
  10. Le gyrateur de la revendication 9, dans lequel le moyen de couplage d'amplificateurs comprend un moyen de couplage capacitif (Cc) pour coupler de façon capacitive les sorties des amplificateurs différentiels aux entrées respectives de l'autre amplificateur.
  11. Le gyrateur de la revendication 10, dans lequel le moyen de couplage capacitif comprend quatre éléments capacitifs (2171, 2172, 2191, 2192), chacun d'eux couplant l'une des sorties des amplificateurs différentiels à l'entrée respective de l'autre amplificateur.
  12. Le gyrateur de la revendication 9, dans lequel chacun des premier et second amplificateurs différentiels comprend un amplificateur à transconductance variable.
  13. Le gyrateur de la revendication 12, comprenant en outre un moyen de commande de gain (213) pour faire fonctionner l'amplificateur à transconductance variable comme un amplificateur à transconductance linéaire variable.
  14. Le gyrateur de la revendication 13, dans lequel l'amplificateur à transconductance variable comprend un moyen amplificateur à gain variable (321) dont le gain est commandé de façon linéaire par le moyen de commande de gain.
  15. Le gyrateur de la revendication 14, dans lequel l'amplificateur à gain variable (321) comprend :
    • des première et seconde sources de courant (523, 525, 527, 529);
    • une paire différentielle d'un premier et d'un second transistors (511, 513) dont les bases sont couplées aux entrées inverseuse et non inverseuse de l'amplificateur différentiel;
    • une paire de compensation de troisième et quatrième transistors (519, 521), le collecteur, la base et l'émetteur du troisième transistor étant connectés respectivement à l'émetteur du premier transistor, à l'émetteur du second transistor et à la première source de courant, le collecteur, la base et l'émetteur du quatrième transistor étant connectés respectivement à l'émetteur du second transistor, à l'émetteur du premier transistor et à la seconde source de courant;
    • un élément résistif (533) connecté entre les émetteurs des troisième et quatrième transistors;
    • une paire de résistances actives constituée de cinquième et sixième transistors (515, 517), les émetteurs des cinquième et sixième transistors étant connectés aux collecteurs des premier et second transistors, les collecteurs des cinquième et sixième transistors étant connectés aux entrées inverseuse et non inverseuse de l'amplificateur différentiel;
    • une paire de commande de gain constituée de septième et huitième transistors (537, 535), dont les collecteurs sont respectivement connectés aux collecteurs des sixième et cinquième transistors, les bases des septième et huitième transistors étant connectées respectivement aux émetteurs des cinquième et sixième transistors; et
    • un neuvième transistor (541) dont le collecteur est connecté aux émetteurs des septième et huitièmes transistors, de façon que le gain de l'amplificateur à transconductance variable soit commandé en réponse à une tension de commande de gain appliquée à la base du neuvième transistor.
  16. Le gyrateur de la revendication 15, dans lequel le moyen de commande de gain comprend un moyen de détection pour produire la tension de commande de gain en réponse aux signaux différentiels qui sont fournis par les amplificateurs à transconductance variable, chaque signal différentiel apparaissant aux bornes de l'élément résistif.
  17. Le gyrateur de la revendication 16, dans lequel le moyen de commande de gain comprend un moyen pour détecter la crête du signal différentiel pour produire la tension de commande de gain qui commande automatiquement le gain des premier et second amplificateurs différentiels.
  18. Le gyrateur de la revendication 15 ou 16, dans lequel l'amplificateur à transconductance variable comprend en outre un moyen d'accord pour effectuer un accord avec la tension différentielle entre les collecteurs des troisième et quatrième transistors.
  19. Le gyrateur de la revendication 18, dans lequel le moyen d'accord comprend deux amplificateurs différentiels, chacun d'eux comprenant une paire de transistors et une source de courant, les deux amplificateurs différentiels étant couplés de façon à produire des signaux de quadrants, le gain des amplificateurs différentiels changeant en réponse à la tension de commande de gain.
  20. Le gyrateur de la revendication 19, dans lequel le moyen d'accord comprend en outre un moyen pour faire varier le gain du moyen d'accord en réponse à la tension de commande de gain.
  21. Le gyrateur de la revendication 16, dans lequel le moyen de détection comprend un moyen à transistor pour détecter le signal de crête et un moyen de polarisation pour appliquer une tension de polarisation au moyen à transistor.
  22. Le gyrateur de la revendication 21, dans lequel le moyen de polarisation comprend un moyen de génération de tension pour produire la tension de polarisation qui est compensée en température dans le moyen à transistor.
  23. Le gyrateur de la revendication 22, dans lequel le moyen de génération de tension comprend des transistors dont les coefficients de variation en fonction de la température coïncident avec ceux du moyen à transistor.
  24. Le gyrateur de la revendication 18, dans lequel l'amplificateur à transconductance variable comprend en outre des charges, les amplificateurs fonctionnant dans la région linéaire de celles-ci.
  25. Le gyrateur de la revendication 18, dans lequel l'amplificateur à transconductance variable comprend en outre un moyen de commande automatique de gain qui est électriquement séparé du moyen d'accord.






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