PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP1397246 04.05.2006
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0001397246
Titel FLAMMENHEMMENDER, BEBILDERTER VLIESSTOFF
Anmelder Polymer Group, Inc., North Charleston, S.C., US
Erfinder HARTGROVE, Parks, Herbert, Angier, NC 28365, US;
DE LEON, Diaz, Sergio, Mooresville, NC 28115, US;
BLACK, Keith, Samuel, Garner, NC 27529, US;
HIJENGA, Joost, Friso, NL-3065 LB Rotterdam, NL
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
DE-Aktenzeichen 60117855
Vertragsstaaten DE, FR, GB, IT, NL
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 13.12.2001
EP-Aktenzeichen 019912427
WO-Anmeldetag 13.12.2001
PCT-Aktenzeichen PCT/US01/48902
WO-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0002047907
WO-Veröffentlichungsdatum 20.06.2002
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 17.03.2004
EP date of grant 08.03.2006
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 04.05.2006
IPC-Hauptklasse B32B 27/04(2006.01)A, F, I, 20051017, B, H, EP
IPC-Nebenklasse B32B 27/12(2006.01)A, L, I, 20051017, B, H, EP   B27N 9/00(2006.01)A, L, I, 20051017, B, H, EP   D04H 1/46(2006.01)A, L, I, 20051017, B, H, EP   

Beschreibung[en]
Technical Field

The present invention relates generally to methods of making nonwoven fabrics, and more particularly to a method of manufacturing three-dimensional imaged nonwoven fabrics exhibiting flame-retardant characteristics while retaining aesthetic appeal, abrasion resistance, and fabric strength, these properties permitting use of the fabric in wall cover applications.

Background of the Invention

Significant quantities of textile fabric are employed in the construction of domestic and business furnishings, room dividers and acoustic panels. Manufactures of such textile fabrics are cognizant of the end-use of their materials in these constructions and have looked to improve the aesthetic qualities of the fabrics. Further, manufactures have also taken safety into consideration and looked to ways in which the textile fabric can be imparted with improved levels of flame retardancy.

The production of conventional textile fabrics is known to be a complex, multi-step process. The production of fabrics from staple fibers begins with the carding process where the fibers are opened and aligned into a feedstock known as sliver. Several strands of sliver are then drawn multiple times on drawing frames to further align the fibers, blend, improve uniformity as well as reduce the diameter of the sliver. The drawn sliver is then fed into a roving frame to produce roving by further reducing its diameter as well as imparting a slight false twist. The roving is then fed into the spinning frame where it is spun into yam. The yarns are next placed onto a winder where they are transferred into larger packages. The yarn is then ready to be used to create a fabric.

For a woven fabric, the yarns are designated for specific use as warp or fill yarns. The fill yarn packages (which run in the cross direction and are known as picks) are taken straight to the loom for weaving. The warp yarns (which run on in the machine direction and are known as ends) must be further processed. The packages of warp yarns are used to build a warp beam. Here the packages are placed onto a warper, which feeds multiple yarn ends onto the beam in a parallel array. The warp beam yarns are then run through a slasher where a water-soluble sizing is applied to the yarns to stiffen them and improve abrasion resistance during the remainder of the weaving process. The yarns are wound onto a loom beam as they exit the slasher, which is then mounted onto the back of the loom. Here the warp and fill yarns are interwoven in a complex process to produce yardages of textile fabric.

In contrast, the production of nonwoven fabrics from staple fibers is known to be more efficient than traditional textile processes as the fabrics are produced directly from the carding process with a topical treatment of the nonwoven fabric readily being applied.

Nonwoven fabrics are suitable for use in a wide-variety of applications where the efficiency with which the fabrics can be manufactured provides a significant economic advantage for these fabrics versus traditional textiles. However, nonwoven fabrics have commonly been disadvantaged when fabric properties are compared, particularly in terms of surface abrasion, pilling and durability in multiple-use applications. Hydroentangled fabrics have been developed with improved properties, which are a result of the entanglement of the fibers or filaments in the fabric providing improved fabric integrity. Subsequent to entanglement, fabric durability can be further enhanced by the application of binder compositions and/or by thermal stabilization of the entangled fibrous matrix. However, the use of such means to obtain fabric durability comes at the cost of a stiffer and less appealing fabric.

The resulting textile or nonwoven fabric requires further processing before a suitable material is available for the construction of furnishings. Fabric constructed by either mechanism is essentially planar, having little in way of macroscopic asperities, let alone, a three-dimensional aesthetic quality. It has been necessary in the art to further treat the fabric with embossing techniques or complex foaming agents in order to impart the fabric with a multi-planar, aesthetic quality. In addition, depending upon whether or not the textile fabric was woven from costly flame-retardant staple fiber, a subsequent topical treatment containing an appropriate flame-retardant chemistry is required.

U.S. Patent No. 3,485,706, to Evans discloses processes for effecting hydroentanglement of nonwoven fabrics. More recently, hydroentanglement techniques have been developed which impart images or patterns to the entangled fabric by effecting hydroentanglement on three-dimensional image transfer devices. Such three-dimensional image transfer devices are disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 5,098,764 with the use of such image transfer devices being desirable for providing a fabric with enhanced physical properties as well as an aesthetically pleasing appearance.

In preparing an imaged nonwoven material by the present invention for use in furnishings, the material has also been found to have inherent physical properties that render the material eminently suitable for wall coverings, window coverings, upholstery, and drapery applications, which are hereby referenced as co-pending applications.

Heretofore, attempts have been made to develop flame-retardant nonwoven fabrics exhibiting the necessary aesthetic and physical properties for durable consumer applications.

U.S. Patent No. 4,320,163, to Schwartz discloses a three-dimensional ceiling board facing. This patent contemplates selectively coating a flame-retardant substrate with a print paste consisting of a foamable plastisol. By then exposing said-coated substrate to an elevated temperature, the plastisol increases variably in height under the influence of expanding thermoplastic microspheres, forming a roughened or "pebbled" surface.

A construct is disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 4,830,897, to Seward, whereby an initial woven textile fabrics receives thereupon a heat dissipating metallic foil followed by a fibrous batt. The application of a subsequent mechanical needling procedure integrates the layers into a unitary construct.

US patent No. 5,437,904 to Roger Boulanger et al. discloses a method for entangling loosely associated fibres to form a unitary reticular network by using fluid streams applied in opposition to the fibres. This patent employs fibers such as Nomex for fabric construct.

US patent No. 5,252,386 to J. Hughes and Van Oglesby discloses an entangled nonwoven fabric of polyester fibers, which has balanced tensile strength properties and improved fire retardant properties. The balanced tensile strength properties and improved fire retardant properties are achieved by cross stretching the entangled fabric after the fabric has been wetted with an aqueous-based fire retardant composition and drying the wetted fabric while maintaining it in its stretched state.

US patent No. 3,485,706 to James Evans et al. discloses textile-like nonwoven fabrics of fibers randomly entangled with each other in a repeating pattern of localized entangled regions interconnected by fibers extending between adjacent entangled regions. It also discloses a process for consolidating fibers or filaments into strong patterned structures without using the conventional process steps previously required for producing strong, nonbonded, patterned fabrics, such as weaving, knitting, netting or the like, and without the need for binder or other supplementary treatment.

There are a number of Japanese patents directed to nonwoven fabrics used as a component in wall covering fabrication. JP10168756 to Kawano, et al., utilizes a flame-retardant spunbond containing diguanidine phosphate laminated to a wallpaper backing. A wallpaper is disclosed in JP10131097 to Takeuchi, et al., whereby a nonowoven fabric is adhesively bonded to wallpaper backing, the adhesive containing a significant amount of a high specific gravity fireproofing agent. JP3251452 to Nakakawara, et al., discloses an alternate foam texturing process wherein a uniform foam layer is initially applied to a nonwoven substrate, then a solvent is printed thereon to reductively pattern the laminate. A final patent of interest is JP11335958 to Nanbae, et al., whereby a two layered nonwoven fabric, each layer consisting of less than 20% thermally fusible fibers is subjected to an embossing process.

As can be seen in the prior art, there has not been an effective melding of three-dimensional aesthetic qualities with flame-retardant properties in a fabric suitable for furnishing, window covering, and wall covering applications.

Summary of the Invention

In accordance with the present invention, a method of making a flame-retardant nonwoven fabric is defined in independent claim 1 and a flame-retardant nonwoven fabric is defined in independent claim 5. Advantageous embodiments are claimed in dependent claims.

Other features and advantages of the present invention will become readily apparent from the following detailed description, the accompanying drawings, and the appended claims.

Brief Description of the Drawings

The invention will be more easily understood by a detailed explanation of the invention including drawings. Accordingly, drawings, which are particularly suited for explaining the invention, are attached herewith; however, it should be understood that such drawings are for explanation purposes only and are not necessarily to scale. The drawings are briefly described as follows:

  • FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic view of an apparatus for manufacturing a durable nonwoven fabric, embodying the principles of the present invention:
  • FIGURE 2 is a diagrammatic view of an apparatus for the application of a flame-retardant finish onto a nonwoven fabric, embodying the principles of the present invention;
  • FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary top plan view of a three-dimensional image transfer device of the type used for practicing the present invention, referred to as "slubs";
  • FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary top plan view of a three-dimensional image transfer device of the type used for practicing the present invention, referred to as "cross slubs";
  • FIGURE 5 is a photograph of the resultant material utilizing the image transfer device depicted in FIGURE 3; and
  • FIGURE 6 is a photograph of the resultant material utilizing the image transfer device depicted in FIGURE 5.

Detailed Description

While the present invention is susceptible of embodiment in various forms, there is shown in the drawings and will hereinafter be described a presently preferred embodiment of the invention, with the understanding that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exemplification of the invention, and is not intended to limit the invention to the specific embodiment illustrated.

In accordance with the present invention, a durable flame-retardant nonwoven fabric can be produced which can be employed in a wide variety of wall coverings described as applied to wallpaper. It should be understood, however, that upon suitable modification the invention can be adapted for use with cloth, wood veneer, plastic or combinations thereof, as exemplified by U.S. Patent No. 3,663,269 to Fischer et al. with the fabric exhibiting sufficient flame-retardancy, drapeability, abrasion resistance, strength, and tear resistance, with colorfastness to light. It has been difficult to develop nonwoven fabrics that achieve the desired hand, drape, and pill resistance that are inherent in woven fabrics.

In the case where nonwoven fabrics are produced using staple length fibers, the fabric typically has a degree of exposed surface fibers that will abrade or "pill" if not sufficiently entangled, and/or not treated with the appropriate polymer chemistries subsequent to hydroentanglement. The present invention provides a finished fabric that can be conveniently cut, sewn, and packaged for retail sale or utilized as a component in the fabrication of a more complex article. The cost associated with designing/weaving, fabric preparation, dyeing and finishing steps can be desirably reduced.

With reference to FIGURE 1, therein is illustrated an apparatus for practicing the present method for forming a nonwoven fabric. The fabric is formed from a fibrous matrix preferably comprising staple length fibers, but it is within the purview of the present invention that different types of fibers, or fiber blends, can be employed. The fibrous matrix is preferably carded and cross-lapped to form a precursor web, designated P. In current embodiments, the precursor web comprises staple length polyester fibers, particularly polyester having an independent level of flame-retardancy.

FIGURE 1 illustrates a hydroentangling apparatus for forming nonwoven fabrics in accordance with the present invention. The apparatus includes a foraminous forming surface in the form of belt 12 upon which the precursor web P is positioned for pre-entangling by entangling manifold 14.

The entangling apparatus of FIGURE 1 further includes an imaging and patterning drum 18 comprising a three-dimensional image transfer device for effecting imaging and patterning of the lightly entangled precursor web. The image transfer device includes a moveable imaging surface which moves relative to a plurality of entangling manifolds 22 which act in cooperation with three-dimensional elements defined by the imaging surface of the image transfer device to effect imaging and patterning of the fabric being formed.

Manufacture of a durable nonwoven fabric embodying the principles of the present invention is initiated by providing the precursor nonwoven web, preferably in the form of a 100% flame-retardant polyester or polyester blend. The use of the polyester desirably provides drape, which upon treatment with the specific binder formulation listed herein, results in a material with improved flame retardant properties at relatively low cost. During invention development, fibrous layers comprising flame-retardant polyester, standard polyester, p-aramid, n-aramid, melamine, and modacrylic fibers in blend ratios between about 100% by weight to 20% by weight minor component to 80% by weight major component were found effective. Such blending of the layers in the precursor web was also found to yield aesthetically pleasing color variations due to the differential absorption of dyes during the optional dyeing steps.

After formation and integration of the imaged and patterned nonwoven fabric, a flame-retardant binder finish is applied. The flame-retardant binder finish includes chemistries to render the treated fabric the ability to resist advanced thermal degradation and flame progression when exposed to combustion temperatures. A preferred chemistry employed herein is based on a halogenated derivative of a polyurethane backbone. Additional chemistries, including metallic salt extinguisants, can be used in conjunction with the halogenated polyurethane.

Upon application and curing of the flame-retardant binder finish on the imaged nonwoven fabric, the resulting fabric can be dyed by conventional textile dying methods. Various dyeing methods commonly known in the art are applicable including nip, pad, and jet, with the use of a jet apparatus and disperse dyes, as represented by U.S. Patents No. 5,440,771 and No. 3,966,406 being most preferred.

Examples Example 1

Using a forming apparatus as illustrated in FIGURE 1, a nonwoven fabric was made in accordance with the present invention by providing a carded, randomized precursor fibrous batt comprising Type DPL 535 flame-retardant polyester fiber, 1.5 denier by 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) staple length, as obtained from Fiber Innovation Technology of North Carolina. The web had a basis weight of 9.48 mg/cm2 (2.8 ounces per square yard) (plus or minus 7%).

Prior to patterning and imaging of the precursor web, the web was entangled by a series of entangling manifolds such as diagrammatically illustrated in FIGURE 1. FIGURE 1 illustrates disposition of precursor web P on a foraminous forming surface in the form of belt 12, with the web acted upon by entangling manifolds 14. In the present examples, each of the entangling manifolds included three each 120 micron orifices spaced at 42.3 per 2.54 cm (inch), with the manifolds successively operated at 3 strips each at 7.04, 21.13 and 56.34 Bar (100, 300, 800 psi), at a line speed of 18.29 m/min (60 feet per minute).

The entangling apparatus of FIGURE 1 further includes an imaging and patterning drum 18 comprising a three-dimensional image transfer device for effecting imaging and patterning of the now-entangled precursor web. The entangling apparatus includes a plurality of entangling manifolds 22 that act in cooperation with the three-dimensional image transfer device of drum 18 to effect patterning of the fabric. In the present example, the three entangling manifolds 22 were operated at 197.18 Bar (2800 psi), at a line speed which was the same as that used during pre-entanglement.

The three-dimensional image transfer device of drum 24 was configured as a so-called cross-slubs, as illustrated in FIGURE 4.

Subsequent to patterned hydroentanglement, the fabric was dried on three consecutive steam cans at about 135°C (275°F), then received a substantially uniform application by dip and nip saturation of a flame-retardant binder composition at application station. The web was then directed through three consecutive steam cans 41, operated at about 121.11°C (250°F)

In the present example, the pre-dye finish composition was applied at a line speed of 18.29 m/min (60 feet per minute), with a nip pressure of 2.25 Bar (32 pounds per square inch)and percent wet pick up of approximately 125 %.

The flame retardant finish formulation, by weight percent of bath, was as follows:

  • Water    90%
  • Vycar 460x46 [vinyl chloride acrylic co-polymer binder]    10%
As is registered to and can be obtained from B.F. Goodrich of Akron, Ohio

Example 2

A fabric as made in the manner described in EXAMPLE 1, whereby in the alternative the flame-retardant binder composition formulation, by weight percent of bath, was as follows: Chemwet MQ-2 [wetting agent] 0.25% Defoam 525 [silicone anti-foam] 0.25% Pyron 6135 [halogenated polyurethane] 16.0% Chemonic TH-22 [thickener] 1.0 %

The above being registered to and can be obtained from Chemonic Industries, of North Carolina. Ammonium hydroxide, Aqueous 0.50%

As is registered to and can be obtained from B.F. Goodrich, of Ohio Water 82.0%

Example 3

A fabric as made in the manner described in EXAMPLE 1, whereby in the alternative 20.0% Pyron 6139 was used in place of 16% Pyron 6135 and 78.0% water was used in place of 82.0% water.

The following benchmarks have been established in connection with nonwoven fabrics, which exhibit the desired combination of durability, softness, abrasion resistance, etc., for certain home use applications. Vertical Flame Test NFPA-701 Fabric Strength/Elongation ASTM D5034 Absorbency -- Capacity ASTM D1117 Elmendorf Tear ASTM D5734 Handle-o-meter ASTM D2923 Stiffness -- Cantilever Bend ASTM D5732 Fabric Weight ASTM D3776 Martindale Abrasion Test ASTM D4970 Colorfastness To Crocking AATCC 8-1988

The test data in the attached tables shows that nonwoven fabrics approaching, meeting, or exceeding the various above-described benchmarks for fabric performance in general, and to commercially available products in specific, can be achieved with fabrics formed in accordance with the present invention. For many applications, fabrics having basis weights between about 6.76 mg/cm2 (2.0 ounces per square yard) and 20.32 mg/cm2 (6.0 ounces per square yard) are preferred, with fabrics having basis weights of about 8.47 mg/cm2 (2.5 ounces per square yard) to about 11.85 mg/cm2 (3.5 ounces per square yard) being most preferred. Fabrics formed in accordance with the present invention are flame-retardant, durable and drapeable and are suitable for decorative wall cover applications.

For upholstery and drapery applications, fabrics having basis weights between about 6.76 mg/cm2 (2.0 ounces per square yard) and 33.87 mg/cm2 (10.0 ounces per square yard) are preferred, with fabrics having basis weights of about 10.16 mg/cm2 (3.0 ounces per square yard) to about 20.32 mg/cm2 (6.0 ounces per square yard) being most preferred. Fabrics formed in accordance with the present invention are flame-retardant, durable and drapeable, and are not only suitable for covering or upholstering furniture such as chairs, couches, love seats, and the like, but also draperies or hanging fabric that prevents the admittance of any ambient light through the fabric.

For window covering applications, fabrics having basis weights between about 1.69 mg/cm2 (0.5 ounces per square yard) and 20.32 mg/cm2 (6.0 ounces per square yard) are preferred, with fabrics having basis weights of about 3.39 mg/cm2 (1.0 ounces per square yard) to about 13.55 mg/cm2 (4.0 ounces per square yard) being most preferred. Fabrics formed in accordance with the present invention are flame-retardant, durable and drapeable, and are suitable for window covering applications. Window coverings of the present invention are those coverings that allow for the admittance of ambient light through the fabric, such as sheets, shades, or blinds including, but not limited to cellular, vertical, roman, soft vertical, and soft horizontal.

It is to be understood that no limitation with respect to the specific embodiments illustrated herein is intended or should be inferred. The disclosure is intended to cover, by the appended claims, all such modifications as fall within the scope of the claims.


Anspruch[de]
Verfahren zur Herstellung eines flammhemmenden Vliesstoffs, umfassend: a. Bereitstellen eines florförmigen Ausgangsstoffs, welcher flammhemmende Polyesterfasern umfasst, b. Bereitstellen einer dreidimensionalen Bildübertragungsvorrichtung, c. wasservermitteltes Verschlingen des florförmigen Ausgangsstoffs auf der Bildübertragungsvorrichtung, um einen gemusterten und abgebildeten Vliesstoff zu bilden, und d. Anwenden eines flammhemmenden Bindemittels auf dem Vliesstoff, um flammhemmende Eigenschaften zu verleihen, anschließendes Aushärten des Bindemittels, wobei das flammhemmende Bindemittel auf ein halogenhaltiges Derivat einer Polyurethan-Hauptkette basiert. Verfahren zur Herstellung eines flammhemmenden Vliesstoffs nach Anspruch 1, wobei: der florförmige Ausgangsstoff auf einer kleine Öffnungen aufweisende Oberfläche vor dem Schritt des wasservermittelten Verschlingens des florförmigen Ausgangsstoffs auf der Bildübertragungsvorrichtung wasservermittelt verschlungen wird. Verfahren zur Herstellung eines flammhemmenden Vliesstoffs nach Anspruch 1, weiter umfassend das Färben des Vliesstoffs. Verfahren zur Herstellung eines flammhemmenden Vliesstoffs nach Anspruch 3, wobei: der Vliesstoff durch eine von dem Mittel ausgewählte Methode gefärbt wird, welche aus Düsenfärben, Dispergierfärben, Klotzfärben, Schablonendruck, Transferdruck und deren Kombinationen bestehen. Flammhemmender Vliesstoff, umfassend: a. Bereitstellen eines florförmigen Ausgangsstoffs, der flammhemmende Polyesterfasern umfasst, b. der florförmige Ausgangsstoff durch wasservermitteltes Verschlingen auf einer dreidimensionalen Bildübertragungsvorrichtung gemustert und abgebildet wird, um einen Vliesstoff zu bilden, c. der Vliesstoff eine im Wesentlichen einheitliche Anwendung eines flammhemmenden Bindemittels bekommt, danach ein Aushärtungsschritt gefolgt wird, das flammhemmende Bindemittel auf ein halogenhaltiges Derivat einer Polyurethan-Hauptkette basiert, d. der resultierende Stoff aufweist einen Gewichtsverlust wegen vertikaler Flamme von weniger als 42%, der mit der Testmethode ASTM D3776 gemessen wird, eine Abriebfestigkeit von zumindest 50 Tabor-Zyklen, die mit der Testmethode ASTM D4970 gemessen wird, und eine Zugfestigkeit in der Maschinenrichtung von zumindest 12,96 kg (38 Pfund), die mit der Testmethode ASTM D5034 gemessen wird. Flammhemmender Vliesstoff nach Anspruch 5, wobei: der Vliesstoff ein Endbasisgewicht von zwischen ungefähr 6,76 mg/cm2 (2,0 Ounces pro Quadratyard) und ungefähr 20,32 mg/cm2 (6,0 Ounces pro Quadratyard) aufweist. Flammhemmender Vliesstoff nach Anspruch 6, wobei: der Vliesstoff ein Endbasisgewicht von zwischen 8,47 mg/cm2 (2,5 Ounces pro Quadratyard) und 11,85 mg/cm2 (3,5 Ounces pro Quadratyard) aufweist. Flammhemmender Vliesstoff nach Anspruch 5, wobei: der Vliesstoff in der Fertigung von Tapeten verwendet wird. Flammhemmender Vliesstoff nach Anspruch 5, wobei: der Vliesstoff in Polsterungs- und Tuchanwendungen benutzt wird und ein Endbasisgewicht zwischen ungefähr 6,76 mg/cm2 (2,0 Ounces pro Quadratyard) und ungefähr 33,87 mg/cm2 (10,0 Ounces pro Quadratyard) hat. Flammhemmender Vliesstoff nach Anspruch 9, wobei: der Vliesstoff ein Endbasisgewicht zwischen 10,16 mg/cm2 (3,0 Ounces pro Quadratyard) und 20,32 mg/cm2 (6,0 Ounces pro Quadratyard) hat. Flammhemmender Vliesstoff nach Anspruch 5, wobei: der Vliesstoff in Fensterabdeckungsanwendungen benutzt wird, und ein Endbasisgewicht zwischen ungefähr 1,69 mg/cm2 (0,5 Ounces pro Quadratyard) und 20,32 mg/cm2 (6,0 Ounces pro Quadratyard) hat. Flammhemmender Vliesstoff nach Anspruch 11, wobei: der Vliesstoff ein Endbasisgewicht zwischen ungefähr 3,39 mg/cm2 (1,0 Ounces pro Quadratyard) und 13,55 mg/cm2 (4,0 Ounces pro Quadratyard) hat.
Anspruch[en]
A method of making a flame-retardant nonwoven fabric, comprising; a. providing a precursor web comprising flame-retardant polyester fibers, b. providing a three-dimensional image transfer device, c. hydroentangling said precursor web on said image transfer device to form a patterned and imaged nonwoven fabric, and d. applying a flame-retardant binder finish to said nonwoven fabric to impart flame-retardant properties, followed by curing of said binder finish, wherein the flame-retardant binder finish is based on a halogenated derivative of a polyurethane backbone. A method of making a flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 1, wherein: said precursor web is hydroentangled on a formainous surface prior to said step of hydroentangling said precursor web on said image transfer device. A method of manufacturing a flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 1, further comprising dyeing of said nonwoven fabric. A method of making a flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 3, wherein: said nonwoven fabric is dyed by the method selected from the means consisting of jet dyeing, disperse dying, pad dyeing, screen printing, transfer printing, and the combinations thereof. A flame-retardant nonwoven fabric, comprising: a. providing a precursor web comprising flame-retardant polyester fibers, b. said precursor web being imaged and patterned by hydroentanglement on a three-dimensional image transfer device to form a nonwoven fabric, c. said nonwoven fabric receiving a substantially uniform application of a flame-retardant binder finish followed by a curing step, wherein the flame-retardant binder finish is based on a halogenated derivative of a polyurethane backbone, d. the resulting fabric exhibiting a weight loss due to vertical flame of less than 42% measured with ASTM D3776 test method, an abrasion resistance of at least 50 Tabor cycles measured with ASTM D4970 test, and a tensile strength in the machine direction of at least 92.93 kg (38 pounds) measured with ASTM D5034 test method. A flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 5, wherein: said nonwoven fabric exhibiting a final basis weight of between about 6.76 mg/cm2 (2.0 ounces per square yard) and about 20.32 mg/cm2 (6.0 ounces per square yard). A flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 6, wherein: said nonwoven fabric exhibiting a final basis weight of between 8.47 mg/cm2 (2.5 ounces per square yard) and 11.85 mg/cm2 (3.5 ounces per square yard). A flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 5, wherein: said nonwoven fabric used in the fabrication of wall coverings. A flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 5, wherein: said fabric is employed in upholstery and drapery applications, and has a final basis weight between about 6.76 mg/cm2 (2.0 ounces per square yard) and about 33.87 mg/cm2 (10.0 ounces per square yard). A flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 9, wherein: said fabric has a final basis weight between 10.16 mg/cm2 (3.0 ounces per square yard) and 20.32 mg/cm2 (6.0 ounces per square yard). A flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 5, wherein: said fabric is employed in window covering applications, and has a final basis weight between about 1.69 mg/cm2 (0.5 ounces per square yard) and 20.32 mg/cm2 (6.0 ounces per square yard). A flame-retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 11, wherein: said fabric has a final basis weight between about 3.39 mg/cm2 (1.0 ounces per square yard) and 13.55 mg/cm2 (4.0 ounces per square yard).
Anspruch[fr]
Procédé de fabrication d'un tissu non tissé ignifugeant, comprenant : a. la fourniture d'une bande de tissu précurseur comprenant des fibres de polyester ignifugeantes, b. la fourniture d'un dispositif de transfert d'image tridimensionnelle, c. l'hydroenchevêtrement de ladite bande de tissu précurseur sur ledit dispositif de transfert d'image pour former un tissu non tissé à motifs et à images, et d. l'application d'un apprêt liant ignifugeant audit tissu non tissé pour communiquer des propriétés ignifugeantes, suivie par la cuisson dudit apprêt liant, dans lequel l'apprêt liant ignifugeant est basé sur un dérivé halogéné d'un squelette de polyuréthane. Procédé de fabrication d'un tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 1, dans lequel : ladite bande de tissu précurseur est enchevêtrée de façon hydraulique sur une surface poreuse avant ladite étape d'hydroenchevêtrement de ladite bande de tissu précurseur sur ledit dispositif de transfert d'image. Procédé de fabrication d'un tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 1, comprenant de plus la teinture dudit tissu non tissé. Procédé de fabrication d'un tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 3, dans lequel : ledit tissu non tissé est teint par un procédé sélectionné parmi les procédés suivants : teinture à jet, teinture avec colorant dispersé, teinture par foulardage, impression à la lyonnaise, impression par transfert, et leurs combinaisons. Tissu non tissé ignifugeant, comprenant : a. la fourniture d'une bande de tissu précurseur comprenant des fibres de polyester ignifugeantes, b. ladite bande de tissu précurseur devenant à motifs et à images par hydroenchevêtrement sur un dispositif de transfert d'image tridimensionnelle pour former un tissu non tissé, c. ledit tissu non tissé recevant une application sensiblement uniforme d'un apprêt liant ignifugeant suivie par une étape de cuisson, dans laquelle l'apprêt liant ignifugeant est basé sur un dérivé halogéné d'un squelette de polyuréthane, d. le tissu résultant présentant une perte de poids due à une flamme verticale de moins de 42 % mesurée avec le procédé d'évaluation ASTM D3776, une résistance à l'abrasion d'au moins 50 cycles de Tabor mesurée avec le procédé d'évaluation ASTM D4970, et une résistance à la traction dans le sens machine d'au moins 12,93 kg (38 livres) mesurée avec le procédé d'évaluation ASTM D5034. Tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 5, dans lequel : ledit tissu non tissé présente une masse surfacique finale entre environ 6,76 mg/cm2 (2,0 onces par yard carré) et environ 20,32 mg/cm2 (6,0 onces par yard carré). Tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 6, dans lequel : ledit tissu non tissé présente une masse surfacique finale entre 8,47 mg/cm2 (2,5 onces par yard carré) et 11,85 mg/cm2 (3,5 onces par yard carré). Tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 5, dans lequel : ledit tissu non tissé est utilisé dans la fabrication de revêtements muraux. Tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 5, dans lequel : ledit tissu est utilisé dans des applications de tissu d'ameublement et de draperie, et a une masse surfacique finale entre environ 6,76 mg/cm2 (2,0 onces par yard carré) et environ 33,87 mg/cm2 (10,0 onces par yard carré). Tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 9, dans lequel : ledit tissu a une masse surfacique finale entre 10,16 mg/cm2 (3,0 onces par yard carré) et 20,32 mg/cm2 (6,0 onces par yard carré). Tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 5, dans lequel : ledit tissu est utilisé dans des applications de couverture de fenêtre, et a une masse surfacique finale entre environ 1,69 mg/cm2 (0,5 once par yard carré) et 20,32 mg/cm2 (6,0 onces par yard carré). Tissu non tissé ignifugeant selon la revendication 11, dans lequel : ledit tissu a une masse surfacique finale entre environ 3,39 mg/cm2 (1,0 once par yard carré) et 13,55 mg/cm2 (4,0 onces par yard carré).






IPC
A Täglicher Lebensbedarf
B Arbeitsverfahren; Transportieren
C Chemie; Hüttenwesen
D Textilien; Papier
E Bauwesen; Erdbohren; Bergbau
F Maschinenbau; Beleuchtung; Heizung; Waffen; Sprengen
G Physik
H Elektrotechnik

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