PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP1556458 15.02.2007
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0001556458
Titel SELBSTZERST RENDER FILTERKUCHEN
Anmelder Schlumberger Technology B.V., Den Haag, NL
Erfinder WILLBERG, Dean, 109004 Moscow, RU;
DISMUKE, Keith, Katy, TX 77450, US
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
DE-Aktenzeichen 60310978
Vertragsstaaten AT, BE, BG, CH, CY, CZ, DE, DK, EE, ES, FI, FR, GB, GR, HU, IE, IT, LI, LU, MC, NL, PT, RO, SE, SI, SK, TR
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 17.10.2003
EP-Aktenzeichen 037694171
WO-Anmeldetag 17.10.2003
PCT-Aktenzeichen PCT/EP03/11564
WO-Veröffentlichungsnummer 2004037946
WO-Veröffentlichungsdatum 06.05.2004
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 27.07.2005
EP date of grant 03.01.2007
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 15.02.2007
IPC-Hauptklasse C09K 8/02(2006.01)A, F, I, 20061205, B, H, EP
IPC-Nebenklasse E21B 33/138(2006.01)A, L, I, 20061205, B, H, EP   E21B 37/06(2006.01)A, L, I, 20061205, B, H, EP   C09K 8/04(2006.01)A, L, I, 20061205, B, H, EP   

Beschreibung[en]
Background of the Invention

This invention relates to a composition and method for generating self-destructing filter cakes in wellbores and in subterranean formations. More particularly it relates to a composition and method for injection of solids-containing fluids that form filter cakes in which acids are generated after the filter cakes have been placed. Finally, it relates to using the composition and method in oilfield applications.

There are many oilfield applications in which filter cakes are needed in the wellbore, in the near-wellbore region or in one or more strata of the formation. Such applications are those in which without a filter cake fluid would leak off into porous rock at an undesirable rate during a well treatment. Such treatments include drilling, drill-in, completion, stimulation (for example, hydraulic fracturing or matrix dissolution), sand control (for example gravel packing, frac-packing, and sand consolidation), diversion, scale control, water control, and others. Typically, after these treatments have been completed the continued presence of the filter cake is undesirable or unacceptable.

Solid, insoluble, materials (that may be called fluid loss additives and filter cake components) are typically added to the fluids used in these treatments to form the filter cakes, although sometimes soluble (or at least highly dispersed) components of the fluids (such as polymers or crosslinked polymers) may form the filter cakes. Removal of the filter cake is typically accomplished either by a mechanical means (scraping, jetting, or the like), by subsequent addition of a fluid containing an agent (such as an acid, a base, or an enzyme) that dissolves at least a portion of the filter cake, or by manipulation of the physical state of the filter cake (by emulsion inversion, for example). These removal methods usually require a tool or addition of another fluid (for example to change the pH or to add a chemical). This can sometimes be done in the wellbore but normally cannot be done in a proppant or gravel pack. Sometimes the operator may rely on the flow of produced fluids (which will be in the opposite direction from the flow of the fluid when the filter cake was laid down) to loosen the filter cake or to dissolve the filter cake (for example if it is a soluble salt). However, these methods require fluid flow and often result in slow or incomplete filter cake removal. Sometimes a breaker can be incorporated in the filter cake but these must normally be delayed (for example by esterification or encapsulation) and they are often expensive and/or difficult to place and/or difficult to trigger.

There is a need for a new composition and method in which a filter cake is formed from at least two components, one of which slowly reacts with water, and the second of which reacts with a reaction product of the first to destroy the filter cake spontaneously.

US 2002/142,919 discloses coatings for well screens that protect the screens from damage as they are inserted into the wellbore and once in the well, release reactive materials to react with and degrade potentially plugging materials such as drill solids, fluid filtercakes, fluid loss additives, and drilling fluids. The coatings can be specifically designed for individual well conditions and are comprised of a binder that either melts or dissolves within the wellbore, and one or more reactive materials which are released into the screen and the near wellbore area and which are effective in degrading or dissolving materials which could potentially plug the screen

EP0404489 discloses the use of hydroxyacetic acid condensation product as a fluid loss material in a well completion or workover process in which a fluid comprising a hydrolyzable aqueous gel is used. The hydroxyacetic acid condensation product degrades at formation conditions to provide hydroxyacetic acid which breaks the aqueous gel.

WO0078890 discloses a water based wellbore fluid comprising a fluid loss additive and a bridging material that are hydrophobic in nature, hydrophobically modified or oil wettable. The wellbore fluid generates an active filter cake that once formed, is impermeable to an aqueous phase, thus reducing fluid loss and ensuring reduced damage to the formation, yet is simultaneously permeable to the back flow of hydrocarbons during a hydrocarbon recovery process

Summary of the Invention

According to the invention, there is provided a composition for use in a well, the composition being in the form of a fiber, bead, ribbon or platelet and made up of particles each comprising a solid acid-precursor selected from lactide, glycolide, polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid, copolymers of polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid, copolymers of glycolic acid with other hydroxy-, carboxylic acid-, or hydroxycarboxylic acid-containing moieties, copolymers of lactic acid with other hydroxy-, carboxylic acid-, or hydroxycarboxylic acid-containing moieties, and mixtures thereof, and a solid acid-reactive material selected from boric acid, borax, magnesium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, aluminum metaphosphate, sodium zinc potassium polyphosphate glass and sodium calcium magnesium polyphosphate glass.

Preferably, the solid acid-precursor surrounds the solid acid-reactive material, and is coated with a hydrolysis-delaying material.

The invention also includes a well treatment method comprising: preparing a well treatment fluid comprising a composition in accordance with of either of the two preceding paragraphs; injecting the fluid into the well, whereby the fluid contacts the surface of a subterranean earth formation surrounding the well and forms the filter cake comprising the particles of the composition on the formation surface; and allowing at least a portion of the solid acid-precursor to hydrolyze, whereby at least a portion of the particles dissolve, thereby at least partially destroying the filter cake and permitting increased fluid flow into or out of the formation.

Brief Description of the Drawings

  • Figure 1 shows the ability of various organic acids to dissolve calcite.

Detailed Description of the Invention

Excellent sources of acid that can be generated downhole when and where it is needed are solid cyclic dimers, or solid polymers, of certain organic acids, that hydrolyze under known and controllable conditions of temperature, time and pH to form the organic acids. We will call these solid materials "acid-precursors" and we will call the formation of acid downhole "delayed acid generation". One example of a suitable solid acid-precursor is the solid cyclic dimer of lactic acid (known as "lactide"), which has a melting point of 95 to 125 °C, (depending upon the optical activity). Another is a polymer of lactic acid, (sometimes called a polylactic acid (or "PLA"), or a polylactate, or a polylactide). Another example is the solid cyclic dimer of gylycolic acid (known as "glycolide"), which has a melting point of about 86 °C. Yet another example is a polymer of glycolic acid (hydroxyacetic acid), also known as polyglycolic acid ("PGA"), or polyglycolide. Another example is a copolymer of lactic acid and glycolic acid. These polymers and copolymers are polyesters.

Cargill Dow, Minnetonka, MN, USA, produces the solid cyclic lactic acid dimer called "lactide" and from it produces lactic acid polymers, or polylactates, with varying molecular weights and degrees of crystallinity, under the generic trade name NATUREWORKS PLA. The PLA's currently available from Cargill Dow have molecular weights of up to about 100,000, although any polylactide (made by any process by any manufacturer) and any molecular weight material of any degree of crystallinity may be used in the embodiments of the Invention. The PLA polymers are solids at room temperature and are hydrolyzed by water to form lactic acid. Those available from Cargill Dow typically have crystalline melt temperatures of from about 120 to about 170 °C, but others are obtainable. Poly(d,1-lactide) is available from Bio-Invigor, Beijing and Taiwan, with molecular weights of up to 500,000. Bio-Invigor also supplies polyglycolic acid (also known as polyglycolide) and various copolymers of lactic acid and glycolic acid, often called "polyglactin" or poly(lactide-co-glycolide). The rates of the hydrolysis reactions of all these materials are governed by the molecular weight, the crystallinity (the ratio of crystalline to amorphous material), the physical form (size and shape of the solid), and in the case of polylactide, the amounts of the two optical isomers. (The naturally occurring 1-lactide forms partially crystalline polymers; synthetic dl-lactide forms amorphous polymers.) Amorphous regions are more susceptible to hydrolysis than crystalline regions. Lower molecular weight, less crystallinity and greater surface-to-mass ratio all result in faster hydrolysis. Hydrolysis is accelerated by increasing the temperature, by adding acid or base, or by adding a material that reacts with the hydrolysis product(s).

Homopolymers can be more crystalline; copolymers tend to be amorphous unless they are block copolymers. The extent of the crystallinity can be controlled by the manufacturing method for homopolymers and by the manufacturing method and the ratio and distribution of lactide and glycolide for the copolymers. Polyglycolide can be made in a porous form. Some of the polymers dissolve very slowly in water before they hydrolyze.

Other materials suitable as solid acid-precursors are all those polymers of hydroxyacetic acid (glycolic acid) with itself or other hydroxy-, carboxylic acid-, or hydroxycarboxylic acid-containing moieties described in U.S. Patent Nos. 4, 848,467; 4,957,165; and 4,986,355.

In many oilfield applications, fluid loss additives and filter cakes are needed during a treatment, but after the treatment it is desirable that the fluid loss additive or filter cake be substantially gone. To make fluid loss additives and filter cake components, acid-soluble or acid-reactive materials, such as but not limited to magnesia, aluminum hydroxide, calcite, calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, aluminum metaphosphate, sodium zinc potassium polyphosphate glass, and sodium calcium magnesium polyphosphate glass are mixed with or incorporated into, solid acid-precursors, such as cyclic ester dimers of lactic acid or glycolic acid or homopolymers or copolymers of lactic acid or glycolic acid. These fluid loss additives and filter cake components are added to fluids injected into the subsurface in oilfield operations. At least a portion of the solid acid precursors slowly hydrolyzes at controllable rates to release acids at pre-selected locations and times. The acids then react with and dissolve at least a portion of the acid reactive materials. The result is that at least a portion of both the solid acid precursor and the acid reactive solid material dissolve. We will term this "self-destruction" of the mixture. This feature of these materials is used to improve many oil field treatments. Preferably most or all of the solid material initially added is no longer present at the end of the treatments. It is not necessary either for all of the solid acid-precursor to hydrolyze or for all of the solid acid-reactive material to dissolve. It is necessary only that a sufficient amount of either no longer be a solid portion of the filter cake so that the filter cake no longer forms a deleterious barrier to fluid flow.

Mixtures of one or more solid acid-precursors and one or more solid acid-reactive materials may be purely physical mixtures of separate particles of the separate components. The mixtures may also be manufactured such that one or more solid acid-precursors and one or more solid acid-reactive materials is in each particle; this will be termed a "combined mixture". This may be done, by non-limiting examples, by coating the acid-reactive material with the solid acid-precursor, or by heating a physical mixture until the solid acid-precursor melts, mixing thoroughly, cooling, and comminuting. For example, it is common practice in industry to co-extrude polymers with mineral filler materials, such as talc or carbonates, so that they have altered optical, thermal and/or mechanical properties. Such mixtures of polymers and solids are commonly referred to as "filled polymers". When the solid acid-reactive material is completely enclosed within the solid acid-precursor, the solid acid-reactive material may be water-soluble, for example boric acid or borax. In any case it is preferable for the distribution of the components in the mixtures to be as uniform as possible. The relative amounts of the components may be adjusted for the situation to control the solid acid-precursor hydrolysis rate and the rate and extent of dissolution of the solid acid-reactive material. The most important factors will be the temperature at which the treatment will be carried out, the composition of the aqueous fluid or fluids with which the mixture will come into contact, and the time desired for dissolution of the mixture.

The solid acid-precursors or the mixtures of solid acid-precursors and solid acid-reactive materials may be manufactured in various solid shapes, including, but not limited to fibers, beads, films, ribbons and platelets. The solid acid-precursors or the mixtures of solid acid-precursors and solid acid-reactive materials may be coated to slow the hydrolysis further. Suitable coatings include polycaprolate (a copolymer of glycolide and epsilon-caprolactone), and calcium stearate, both of which are hydrophobic. Polycaprolate itself slowly hydrolyzes. Generating a hydrophobic layer on the surface of the solid acid-precursors or the mixtures of solid acid-precursors and solid acid-reactive materials by any means delays the hydrolysis. Note that coating here may refer to encapsulation or simply to changing the surface by chemical reaction or by forming or adding a thin film of another material. Another suitable method of delaying the hydrolysis of the solid acid-precursor, and the release of acid, is to suspend the solid acid-precursor, optionally with a hydrophobic coating, in an oil or in the oil phase of an emulsion. The hydrolysis and acid release do not occur until water contacts the solid acid-precursor.

An advantage of the composition and method embodiments of the Invention is that, for a given oilfield treatment, the appropriate solid acid-precursor and solid acid-reactive material may be selected readily from among many available materials. The rate of acid generation from a particular solid acid-precursor or a particular mixture of a solid acid-precursor and a solid acid-reactive material, having a particular chemical and physical make-up, including a coating if present, at a particular temperature and in contact with a fluid or fluids of a particular composition (for example pH and the concentration and nature of other components, especially electrolytes), is readily determined by a simple experiment: exposing the acid-precursor to the fluid or fluids under treatment conditions and monitoring the release of acid. The rate of solid acid-reactive material dissolution is governed by similar factors (such as by the choice of solid acid-reactive material, the ratio of materials, the particle size, calcining and coating of solid acid-reactive material) and may readily and easily be determined by similar experiments. Naturally, a solid acid-precursor is selected that a) generates acid at the desired rate (after a suitable delay if needed) and b) is compatible with and does not interfere with the function of other components of the fluid. An acid-reactive material is selected that dissolves in the evolving fluid at a suitable rate and is compatible with the function of other components of the fluid. This is done for all of the methods described below.

The mixture self-destructs in situ, that is, in the location where it is placed. That location may be part of a suspension in a treatment fluid in the wellbore, in the perforations, in a gravel pack, or in a fracture; or as a component of a filter cake on the walls of a wellbore or of a fracture; or in the pores of the formation itself. The mixture may be used in carbonates and sandstones. If the formation is significantly acid soluble, the amount of mixture, or the amount of solid acid-precursor in the mixtures, may be adjusted to account for consumption of acid in reaction with the formation. In use, even though the particles are intended to become part of a filter cake, they may end up in other places, where they are normally undesirable because they impede fluid flow, so in all locations self-destruction is desired.

The particle sizes of the individual components of the mixture may be the same or different. The particle sizes of the individual components of the mixture or of the combined mixture, as they relate to the use as a fluid loss additive and as filter cake former components, depend primarily upon the pore size distribution of the rock onto which the filter cake is to be deposited and whether or not it is intended to eliminate or just to reduce fluid loss. Criteria for, and methods of, choosing the optimal particle sizes or particle size distributions for conventional fluid loss additives and filter cake components are well known. Other particle sizes may be chosen for embodiments of the current Invention; particle sizes or size distributions may be selected as a compromise between those that are optimal for fluid loss control or filter cake formation and those that are optimal for self-destruction at the desired time and rate. The rate of self-destruction can readily be measured in the laboratory in a given fluid at a given temperature.

A particular advantage of these materials is that the solid acid-precursors and the generated acids are non-toxic and are biodegradable. The solid acid-precursors are often used as self-dissolving sutures.

The mixtures of solid acid-precursors and solid acid-reactive materials are used as fluid loss additives, optionally in combination with other materials, as components of filtercake forming compositions. Mixtures in the form of particulates, fibers, films, ribbons or other shapes are added to the drilling, completion, or stimulation fluid to prevent or minimize leakoff during reservoir drilling, drill-in, or stimulation operations - but in the long term they dissolve and eventually clean up without an additional treatment step. Furthermore, if the mixture is formulated so that it generates acid in excess of that required to dissolve the acid-reactive component, then the excess acid produced by hydrolysis stimulates the formation, if it contains acid-soluble material, by etching either the surface of naturally occurring fractures or the face of the formation at the wellbore. Such mixtures that generate extra acid are particularly useful for drilling, "drill-in", and stimulation operations carbonate reservoirs, especially in fractured carbonate reservoirs. Also, an appropriate amount of buffer may be added to the fluid or to the particles to counteract the effects of acid being generated by premature hydrolysis of the solid acid-precursor.

Similarly, a self-destructing fluid leak-off and filter cake forming additive is made for drilling, completions, wellbore intervention and fracturing operations. A self-destructing drill-in fluid includes a mixture of the solid acid-precursor and an acid-soluble particulate material, such as but not limited to CaCO3, aluminum hydroxide, or magnesia. This fluid creates a chemically metastable filtercake that prevents fluid leakoff and formation damage during the drilling process but readily cleans up over time. As the solid acid-precursor hydrolyzes it forms an acid that attacks the carbonate or other particles and, since the solid acid-precursor and carbonates or other materials are intermingled during deposition, the cleanup process is uniform and extensive. In particularly preferred embodiments, the acid-soluble material has a high solubility in the in situ generated acid, that is, a given amount of the acid dissolves a large amount of the acid-soluble material.

In hydraulic fracturing, frac-packing, and gravel packing embodiments, the solid acid-precursor may be added in the pad, throughout the treatment or to only some of the proppant or gravel stages. The solid acid-precursor or mixture may be a fiber in any of these uses and will retard flowback of proppant or gravel, and/or of fines if they are present, until the solid-acid-precursor hydrolyzes and the mixture dissolves. A self-destructing fluid loss additive and filter cake is particularly useful in hydraulic fracturing, frac-packing, and gravel packing because mechanical removal methods are impossible and methods involving contacting the fluid loss additive and filter cake with an additional fluid are not practical. For example, calcite is known to be an excellent fluid loss additive, but calcite is not soluble in water, even at 150 °C. Calcite has been used for years in drilling fluids to form filter cakes that are subsequently removed with acid. Furthermore, solid acid-precursors such as polyglycolic acid soften and deform at high temperatures, whereas particles of materials such as magnesium oxide are hard. The deformation of the softened polyglycolic acid traps the magnesium oxide and makes it an even better fluid loss additive and filter cake former.

There are a number of composition embodiments of the Invention. In the simplest embodiment, sized particles, beads, fibers, platelets or ribbons (or other shapes) of solid acid-precursor are mixed with sized particles of calcium carbonate in a drill-in fluid. It is also within the scope of the Invention to manufacture particles that contain both the solid acid-precursor and the acid-soluble particulate material, for example to co-extrude (and optionally then to comminute) mixtures of calcium carbonate and solid acid-precursor in particles, fibers, platelets or ribbons that are used for this function. Calcium carbonate or other solid acid-reactive material coated with solid acid-precursor may also be used. In these uses, the tightness of the packing of the particles in the filtercake may also be used to control the rates of generation of acid and dissolution of particles by affecting local concentrations of reactants and products, convection, and other factors.

Another advantage to the use the mixtures of the Invention in fluid loss additives and filter cakes is that the acid generated in the self-destruction process may function as a breaker for polymeric or viscoelastic surfactant viscosifying agents. Acids are known to damage or destroy synthetic polymers and biopolymers used to viscosify drilling, completion and stimulation fluids. Acids are also known to damage or destroy either the micelle/vesicle structures formed by viscoelastic surfactants or, in some cases, the surfactants themselves.

When solid acid-precursors or mixtures of solid acid-precursors and solid acid-reactive materials are used in fluids in such treatments as drilling, drill-in, completion, stimulation (for example, hydraulic fracturing or matrix dissolution), sand control (for example gravel packing, frac-packing, and consolidation), diversion, and others, the solid acid-precursor or mixture of solid acid-precursor and solid acid-reactive material are initially inert to the other components of the fluids, so the other fluids may be prepared and used in the usual way. Normally, such fluids already contain a fluid loss additive and filter cake former, so the solid acid-precursor or mixture of solid acid-precursor and solid acid-reactive material replace some or all of the fluid loss additive and filter cake former that would otherwise have been used. In many cases, if the fluid contains a component that would affect or be affected by the solid acid-precursor or mixture of solid acid-precursor and solid acid-reactive material (such as a buffer, another acid-reactive material, or a viscosifier that forms or is incorporated in filter cakes), either the amount or nature of the solid acid-precursor or mixture of solid acid-precursor and solid acid-reactive material or the amount or nature of the interfering or interfered-with component may be adjusted to compensate for the interaction. This may readily be determined by simple laboratory experiments.

Although the compositions and method embodiments of the Invention are described in terms of producing wells for oil and/or gas, the compositions and methods have other uses, for example they may also be used in injection wells (such as for enhanced recovery or for storage or disposal) or in production wells for other fluids such as carbon dioxide or water.

Example 1. Lactic acid is not as commonly used as an acid in oilfield treatments as are formic, acetic and citric acids. Tests were run to determine the capacity of lactic acid in the dissolution of calcite at 82 °C. Figure 1 shows the concentration of calcite in ppm dissolved by reagent grade lactic acid as a function of weight percent acid in water. Lactic acid has a capacity for dissolving calcite that is similar to acetic acid or formic acid, and much higher than citric acid. These tests demonstrate that lactic acid generated from a lactate polymer is effective for dissolution of calcium carbonate.

Example 2. Experiments were performed (Table 1) to evaluate the hydrolysis rate of PLA and to compare the hydrolysis rates of PLA with and without added calcite. The PLA was NATUREWORKS PLA Polylactide Resin 4042D, a polymerized mixture of D- and L-lactic acid, available from Cargill Dow, Minnetonka, MN, USA. The material was used as approximately 4 mm diameter beads. The calcite was reagent grade powder. 45.04 Grams PLA and 20 grams calcite, when used, were added to 500 ml distilled water. The time shown is the time for 100 % hydrolysis. Table 1 Composition 121 °C 135 °C 149 °C PLA Dissolves in greater than 2 hours Dissolves in greater than 2 hours Dissolves in less than 2 hours PLA + Calcite Dissolves in greater than 2 hours 30 minutes Dissolves in less than 2 hours 30 minutes Dissolves in less than 45 minutes Calcite Insoluble Insoluble Insoluble

These results show that this solid acid-precursor hydrolyses and dissolves at a rate suitable for use as a self-destructive fluid loss additive and filter cake former. Furthermore, calcite, which is insoluble in water under these conditions, accelerates the rate of PLA hydrolysis and is itself dissolved in the generated acid.

Example 3. Experiments were run to determine the suitability of various materials as fluid loss additives. Experimental conditions and results are shown in Table 2. Berea sandstone cores (2.54 cm long and 2.54 cm in diameter) were mounted in an API static fluid loss cell. Cores were flushed with 2% KCl brine, heated to the indicated temperature, and the permeability to the brine was determined at a flow rate of 5 ml/min. Then the indicated fluid was injected at a constant pressure of 6.895 MPa. The weight of effluent fluid was determined with a balance and recorded as a function of time. Leak-off was characterized in two ways: the "spurt", which was the initial rapid leak-off of fluid before a filter cake barrier was formed on the core face (indicated by the grams fluid leaked off in the first 30 seconds), and, "wall", which was the subsequent leak-off that occurred even after a filter cake was formed (indicated by the grams per minute of fluid leaked off between 15 and 30 minutes).

All concentrations shown in Table 2 are in weight percent. The surfactant used in all experiments was obtained from the supplier (Rhodia, Inc. Cranbury, New Jersey, U. S. A.) as Mirataine BET-E-40; it contains 40% active ingredient (erucylamidopropyl betaine), with the remainder being substantially water, sodium chloride, and isopropanol. The MgO used was MagChem 35, obtained from Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC, Baltimore, MD, USA. It has a mean particle size of 3 - 8 microns. The PGA used was Dupont TLF 6267, described by the supplier as a crystalline material having a molecular weight of about 600 and a mean particle size of about 8 to 15 microns. The Al(OH)3 used was obtained from Aldrich. It has a mean particle size of about 40 microns. The PGA and the solid acid-reactive materials were added as separate particles. The buffer used in Experiment 25 was sodium sesquicarbonate.

These data show that all the mixtures of PGA and magnesium oxide, sized calcium carbonate, or aluminum hydroxide are excellent fluid loss additives and form filter cakes that very effectively reduce flow through these cores. (Without the additives, the flow through a 100 mD core would be greater than 100 g in a 30 minute test.) The fluid loss additives and filter cake formers are effective at various total concentrations and ratios of solid acid-precursor to solid acid-reactive material, in cores having a broad range of quite high permeabilities, and at several temperatures. They reduce both the spurt and the subsequent leak-off. Furthermore, when the composition of the Invention is used, a lower concentration of surfactant may be required. Table 2 Experiment Result Test ID Run Formulation Temp. Perm g/30 min "Spurt" g "Wall" g/min 7598-11 1 3% Surfactant + 0.5% PGA + 0.4 % MgO 65.6C 167mD 17 7598-113 2 3% Surfactant + 0.5% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 137 23 7598-114 3 3% Surfactant + 0.5% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 152 11 2 0.29 7598-115 4 3% Surfactant + 0.5% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 106 13 7598-17 5 6% Surfactant + 0.5% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 235 12 7598-171 6 3% Surfactant + 0.5% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 230 22 7598-172 7 3% Surfactant + 0.5% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 210 34 7598-18 8 6% Surfactant + 0.5% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 209 11 7598-19 9 6% Surfactant + 0.5% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 211 31 7598-21 10 6% Surfactant + 0.5% MgO 65.6 125 23 7.5 0.37 7598-231 11 6% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 42 5.5 7598-232 12 6% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 171 6 2 . 0.088 7598-233 13 6% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 306 7 7598-24 14 3% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 65.6 246 19 7598-25 15 6% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 93.3 29 7 7598-251 16 6% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 93.3 126 7.5 . 7598-252 17 6% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 93.3 299 9.5 7598-28 18 3% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 93.3 51 17 7598-281 19 3% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 93.3 119 18 7598-29 20 3% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% MgO 93.3 300 20 7598-31A 21 3% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% CaC03 (2 micron) 65.6 48 29 7.5 0.52 7598-31B 22 3% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% CaC03 (10 micron) 65.6 40 26 7598-31C 23 6% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% CaCO3 (10 micron) 65.6 43 11 2.5 0.21 7598-31D 24 3% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% CaCO3 (2 micron) + 0.15% MgO 65.6 107 31 7598-39B 25 3% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% Al(OH)3 + 0.2% Buffer 65.6 117 34 6 0.64 7598-39C 26 3% Surfactant + 0.2% PGA + 0.4% Al(OH)3 65.6 128 74 8 1.25


Anspruch[de]
Zusammensetzung für die Verwendung in einem Bohrloch, wobei die Zusammensetzung in Form einer Faser, eines Kügelchens, eines Bandes oder eines Plättchens vorliegt und aus Partikeln gebildet ist, die jeweils umfassen: einen festen Säure-Vorläufer, der ausgewählt ist aus Lactid, Glycolid, polylactischer Säure, polyglycolischer Säure, Copolymeren aus polylactischer Säure und polyglycolischer Säure, Copolymeren aus glycolischer Säure mit anderen hydroxy-, carboxylsäure- oder hydrocarboxylsäure-haltigen Resten, Copolymeren aus lactischer Säure mit anderen hydroxy-, carboxylsäure- oder hydrocarboxylsäure-haltigen Resten und Gemischen hiervon, und ein festes säure-reaktives Material, das ausgewählt ist aus Borsäure, Borax, Magnesiumhydroxid, Calciumcarbonat, Aluminiumhydroxid, Calciumoxalat, Calciumphosphat, Aluminiummethaphosphat, Schwefel-Zink-Kalium-Polyphosphat-Glas und Schwefelcalciummagnesium-Polyphosphat-Glas. Zusammensetzung nach Anspruch 1, bei der der feste Säure-Vorläufer das feste säure-reaktive Material umgibt. Zusammensetzung nach Anspruch 1 oder Anspruch 2, bei der der feste Säure-Vorläufer mit einem Hydrolyseverzögerungsmaterial überzogen ist. Bohrlochbehandlungsverfahren, das umfasst: a. Präparieren eines Bohrlochbehandlungsfluids, das eine Zusammensetzung nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche umfasst; b. Injizieren des Fluids in das Bohrloch, wodurch das Fluid mit der Oberfläche einer das Bohrloch umgebenden unterirdischen Erdformation in Kontakt gelangt und an der Formationsoberfläche den Filterkuchen bildet, der die Partikel der Zusammensetzung enthält; und c. Zulassen, dass wenigstens ein Teil des festen Säure-Vorläufers hydrolysiert, wodurch sich wenigstens ein Teil der Partikel auflöst, wodurch der Filterkuchen wenigstens teilweise zerstört wird und eine erhöhte Fluidströmung in die Formation oder aus der Formation ermöglicht wird. Verfahren nach Anspruch 4, das ferner das Steuern der Rate der wenigstens teilweisen Zerstörung des Filterkuchens durch die Auswahl des Typs und der Menge des festen Säure-Vorläufers und des festen säure-reaktiven Materials in den Partikeln umfasst.
Anspruch[en]
A composition for use in a well, the composition being in the form of a fiber, bead, ribbon or platelet and made up of particles each comprising a solid acid-precursor selected from lactide, glycolide, polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid, copolymers of polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid, copolymers of glycolic acid with other hydroxy-, carboxylic acid-, or hydroxycarboxylic acid-containing moieties, copolymers of lactic acid with other hydroxy-, carboxylic acid-, or hydroxycarboxylic acid-containing moieties, and mixtures thereof, and a solid acid-reactive material selected from boric acid, borax, magnesium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, aluminum metaphosphate, sodium zinc potassium polyphosphate glass and sodium calcium magnesium polyphosphate glass. The composition of claim 1, wherein the solid acid-precursor surrounds the solid acid-reactive material. The composition of claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the solid acid-precursor is coated with a hydrolysis-delaying material. A well treatment method comprising: a. preparing a well treatment fluid comprising a composition in accordance with of any one of the preceding claims; b. injecting the fluid into the well, whereby the fluid contacts the surface of a subterranean earth formation surrounding the well and forms the filter cake comprising the particles of the composition on the formation surface; and c. allowing at least a portion of the solid acid-precursor to hydrolyze, whereby at least a portion of the particles dissolve, thereby at least partially destroying the filter cake and permitting increased fluid flow into or out of the formation. The method of claim 4, further comprising controlling the rate of the at least partial destruction of the filter cake by the selection of the type and amount of the solid acid-precursor and the solid acid-reactive material in the particles.
Anspruch[fr]
Composition pour l'utilisation dans un puits, la composition étant sous la forme d'une fibre, d'une bille, d'un ruban ou d'une plaque et étant composée de particules comprenant chacune un précurseur d'acide solide choisi parmi un lactide, un glycolide, un acide polylactique, un acide polyglycolique, les copolymères d'acide polylactique et d'acide polyglycolique, les copolymères d'acide glycolique avec d'autres groupes contenant un hydroxy, un acide carboxylique ou un acide hydroxycarboxylique, les copolymères d'acide lactique avec d'autres groupes contenant un hydroxy, un acide carboxylique ou un acide hydroxycarboxylique, et des mélanges de ceux-ci, et un matériau réactif avec un acide solide choisi parmi l'acide borique, le borax, l'hydroxyde de magnésium, le carbonate de calcium, l'hydroxyde d'aluminium, l'oxalate de calcium, le phosphate de calcium, le métaphosphate d'aluminium, un verre de polyphosphate de sodium zinc potassium et un verre de polyphosphate de sodium calcium magnésium. Composition selon la revendication 1, dans laquelle le précurseur d'acide solide entoure le matériau réactif avec un acide solide. Composition selon la revendication 1 ou la revendication 2, dans laquelle le précurseur d'acide solide est enrobé avec un matériau retardant l'hydrolyse. Procédé de traitement de puits, comprenant : a. la préparation d'un fluide de traitement de puits comprenant une composition selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes ; b. l'injection du fluide dans le puits, de sorte que le fluide vient au contact de la surface d'une formation souterraine entourant le puits et forme le gâteau de filtration comprenant les particules de la composition sur la surface de formation ; et c. le fait de laisser au moins une partie du précurseur d'acide solide s'hydrolyser, de sorte qu'au moins une partie des particules se dissolvent, détruisant ainsi au moins partiellement le gâteau de filtration et permettant un accroissement du flux de fluide entrant dans la formation ou sortant de celle-ci. Procédé selon la revendication 4, comprenant en outre la régulation de la vitesse de la destruction au moins partielle du gâteau de filtre par le choix de la nature et de la quantité du précurseur d'acide solide et du matériau réactif avec un acide solide dans les particules.






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A Täglicher Lebensbedarf
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G Physik
H Elektrotechnik

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