PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP1489716 27.09.2007
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0001489716
Titel Batterieladegerät mit verbesserter Stabilität
Anmelder STmicroelectronics Design and Application GmbH, 85630 Grasbrunn, DE;
STMicroelectronics S.A., Montrouge, FR;
STMicroelectronics S.r.l., Agrate Brianza, Mailand/Milano, IT
Erfinder Chesnau, David, 85570 Bayern, DE;
Mercandante, Giacomo, 90100 Palermo (PA), IT;
Milazzo, Patrizia, 95030 Sant'Agata Li Battiati (CT), IT;
Bernard, Christopher, 38640 Claix, FR
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
DE-Aktenzeichen 60315614
Vertragsstaaten DE, FR, GB, IT
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 18.06.2003
EP-Aktenzeichen 032914889
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 22.12.2004
EP date of grant 15.08.2007
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 27.09.2007
IPC-Hauptklasse H02J 7/00(2006.01)A, F, I, 20051017, B, H, EP
IPC-Nebenklasse H02M 1/08(2006.01)A, L, I, 20051017, B, H, EP   

Beschreibung[en]

The present invention relates to a circuit for controlling a battery-charger device with a closed-loop architecture.

Battery-supplied systems have become increasingly popular in the last years, thanks to the widespread diffusion of a number of portable devices (for example, mobile telephones). The batteries allow using such systems without the need to plug into the mains supply. However, any battery has a limited duration (for example, some hundreds of hours), so that it must be re-charged after a period of use.

Different kinds of battery-charger devices are known in the art. In a particular architecture, the battery-charger implements an analog closed-loop, which is used to regulate a current applied to the battery during a charging process. For this purpose, the charging current is converted into a voltage, which is measured by a corresponding sensor. The sensing voltage is compared with a reference voltage; a resulting error voltage is amplified and then used to regulate the charging current accordingly. Typically, a circuit implementing the above-described feedback loop (for controlling the battery-charger) is integrated in a chip of semiconductor material.

The sensing voltage to be measured has a very low value (of the order of some mV); moreover, the sensor suffers a significant direct current (DC) offset, which can swamp any useful sensing voltage. As a consequence, the sensor is commonly stabilized with a chopper-based technique to reduce its offset. The chopper-stabilized sensor operates in a track-and-hold (T/H) mode, under the control of a periodic clock signal; particularly, during a first half-period (tracking phase) the sensing voltage is transferred to an output of the sensor, whereas during a second half-period (holding phase) the sensing voltage is sampled and held. In the holding phase, the connections to a resistor used to convert the charging current into the sensing voltage are inverted, so that the opposite polarity offsets cancel.

A problem of the battery-chargers with the closed-loop architecture is that of ensuring their stability. For this purpose, it is necessary to define a model simulating operation of the battery-charger. A stability analysis is then performed on that model; a compensation network (for example, consisting of a feedback capacitor) is designed exploiting classical techniques well known in the art. An additional difficulty is due to the fact that the chopper-stabilized sensor cannot be simulated directly, but its transfer function must be linearized to represent the track-and-hold operation.

A drawback of the solution described-above is that the compensation network cannot be updated any longer, once integrated into the control circuit of the battery-charger. Moreover, the stability of the battery-charger strongly depends on the structure of a regulator external to the control circuit; therefore, different control circuits must be used whenever the regulator is changed. In any case, the compensation capacitor occupies a large area of the chip wherein the control circuit is integrated.

An example of a voltage/current controller device (particulary for interleaving switching regulators) based on a track-and-hold transconductance amplifier is described in US-A-2002/0047694 .

The invention is defined by the features or the independent claims; preferred embodiments are defined in the dependent claims.

Briefly, an aspect of the present invention provides a circuit for controlling a battery-charger device with a closed-loop architecture including sensing means for sensing an operative quantity of the device, means for alternately controlling the sensing means to track the operative quantity during a tracking phase and to hold the operative quantity during a holding phase, and driving means for providing a regulation signal, for regulating the operative quantity, according to a comparison between the sensed operative quantity and a reference value, wherein the circuit further includes means for causing the driving means to hold the regulation signal during at least part of each holding phase.

Moreover, another aspect of the present invention provides a battery-charger device including the circuit, and a portable electronic system using the battery-charging device. A corresponding method of controlling a battery-charger device is also encompassed.

Further features and the advantages of the solution according to the present invention will be made clear by the following description of a preferred embodiment thereof, given purely by way of a non-restrictive indication, with reference to the attached figures, in which:

  • Figure 1 is a pictorial representation of a mobile telephone in which the solution of the invention can be applied;
  • Figure 2 is a schematic block diagram of a battery-charger device included in the telephone;
  • Figure 3 shows the qualitative waveforms of some electrical quantities of the battery-charger device; and
  • Figure 4 is a circuit scheme of an error amplifier included in the battery-charger device.

With reference in particular to Figure 1, a mobile telephone 100 (for example, conforming to the GSM standard) is shown. The telephone 100 consists of a plastic shell 105, from which an antenna 110 projects upwards. The shell 105 is provided with a keypad 115 (used to dial a number, to input a message, or to control different service menus). A display 120 (showing several kinds of information, such as the number of an incoming call) is arranged above the keypad 115. An electronic board 125 (placed inside the shell 105) controls operation of the telephone 100.

A battery 130 (for example, of the NiCa type) supplies the telephone 100. Whenever the battery 130 must be re-charged, an AC/DC transformer 135 is connected to the telephone 100. The transformer 135 is provided with a cable 140, which is plugged into a mains socket (not shown in the figure).

Similar considerations apply if the telephone has a different structure, if the telephone conforms to another standard, or if the battery is of a different type. However, the concepts of the present invention are also applicable in a hand-held computer, or more generally in any other portable electronic system.

Moving to Figure 2, the telephone includes a device 200 for charging the battery 130. The battery-charger device 200 receives an external voltage Vddext (for example, 5.5V with respect to a reference voltage or ground) from the transformer; a corresponding charging current Ichr is delivered to the battery 130.

Two PMOSs 205 and 210 in a back-to-back configuration regulates the charging current Ichr. Particularly, the external voltage Vddext is applied to the drain terminal of the transistor 205. The transistor 205 has the source terminal and the gate terminal that are connected to the source terminal and to the gate terminal, respectively, of the transistor 210. A pull-up resistor 215 is inserted between the source terminals and the gate terminals of the transistors 205,210. A sensing resistor 220 connects the drain terminal of the transistor 210 to a first terminal of the battery 130 (which second terminal is connected to a ground terminal). The transistor 205 works in the resistive zone; the (variable) resistance of the transistor 205 (together with the fixed resistance of the sensing resistor 220) defines the intensity of the charging current Ichr. The transistor 210 operates as a diode, which prevents the battery 130 to discharge through the device 200.

The battery-charger 200 implements an analog closed-loop, wherein the charging current Ichr is controlled in feedback by means of a circuit 225; typically, the control circuit 225 is integrated in a chip of semiconductor material. In detail, the sensing resistor 220 converts the charging current Ichr into a corresponding sensing voltage Vsen. The control circuit 225 measures the sensing voltage Vsen and accordingly regulates the resistance of the transistor 205 (and then the charging current Ichr), by means of a regulation voltage Vreg that is applied to the gate terminals of the transistors 205,210.

For this purpose, the sensing voltage Vsen is input to a sensor 230; the sensor 230 also receives a reference voltage Vref from a block 235 (for example, consisting of a band-gap circuit that provides a very accurate and temperature-insensitive voltage reference Vref). The sensor 230 outputs an error voltage Verr proportional to the difference between the sensing voltage Vsen and the reference voltage Vref. The error voltage Verr is amplified by a corresponding amplifier 240, which directly applies the regulation voltage Vreg to the gate terminals of the transistors 205,210.

A digital unit 245 manages operation of the control circuit 225. Particularly, the digital unit 245 is coupled with the sensor 230 through a corresponding interface 250. The digital interface 250 receives a bit Ith, which is used to program the desired intensity of the charging current Ichr. The digital interface 250 also receives an enabling signal ENs and a clock signal CKs (having a frequency fs and a period Ts=1/fs) for the sensor 230. Likewise, the digital unit 245 provides an enabling signal ENe and a clock signal CKe (having the same frequency as the clock signal CKs) to the error amplifier 240; the clock signal CKe is underlined to denote that it is substantially opposed to the clock signal CKs. The control circuit 225 also includes a comparator 255. The comparator 255 receives the error voltage Verr (from the sensor 230) and accordingly generates a bit INF indicative of an operative condition of the control circuit 225; the bit INF is returned to the digital unit 245. Operation of the comparator 255 is enabled by a corresponding signal ENc supplied by the digital unit 245.

In some applications known in the art, the loop is periodically opened (for example, every 8 periods of the clock signal CKs) by disconnecting the error amplifier 240 from the sensor 230. This feature is used to monitor operation of the battery-charger 200 in a steady condition (without any regulation). In any case, during the normal operation of the battery-charger 200 the error amplifier 240 is always connected to the sensor 230, and continually regulates the charging current Ichr (according to the error voltage Verr).

Similar considerations apply if the control circuit has an equivalent structure, if the charging current is detected in another way, or if the back-to-back transistors are replaced with an equivalent regulator. However, the concepts of the present invention are also applicable when the error voltage is generated in a different way, when the error amplifier is replaced with generic driving means (for providing an equivalent regulation signal), or when operation of the control circuit is managed in a different way. In any case, the proposed solution is also suitable to be used for controlling a charging voltage applied to the battery, or generally one or more operative quantities of the battery-charger.

As shown in Figure 3, the sensor used in the battery-charger has a chopper-stabilized structure operating in a track-and-hold mode (under the control of the clock signal CKs). In order to explain operation of the sensor, let us consider a generic waveform of the sensing voltage Vsen (diagram a).

During a first half-period Tst of the clock signal CKs defining a tracking phase (diagram b), the sensing voltage Vsen is detected and pre-amplified. In other words, the waveform of the sensing voltage Vsen is multiplied by a unit square wave function equal to 1 during each first half-period of the clock signal CKs [k.0,k.Ts/2]. Denoting with Sqr the unit square wave function, the resulting waveform (diagram c) is expressed in the time domain and in the frequency domain, respectively, by the following formulas: Sqr t Vsen t Sqr f Vsen f

(wherein the symbol ⊗ represents the convolution operation).

During a second half-period Tsh of the clock signal CKs (holding phase), the sensing voltage Vsen is sampled and held. In this phase, the connections to the sensing resistor are flipped; as a consequence, the polarity of any offset is inverted, so that the overall offset over each period Ts is substantially canceled. In detail, the waveform of the sensing voltage Vsen is multiplied by a Dirac delta function consisting of a series of impulses (or comb) located at the ending of each tracking phase (diagram d). The sampled waveform is then convolved with a unit square wave function equal to 1 during each second half-period of the clock signal CKs [k-Ts/2, k·Ts]. Denoting with &dgr;(t) the Dirac delta function, the resulting waveform (diagram e) is expressed in the time domain and in the frequency domain, respectively, by the following formulas: [ Vsen t k = - + &dgr; t - k T s ] S q r ( t - T s 2 ) - S q r t - T s [ Vsen f k = - + &dgr; f - k f s ] S q r ( f - f s 2 ) - S q r f - f s

The error voltage Verr output by the sensor will correspond to the superimposition of the waveforms generated during the tracking phase and the holding phase (diagram f). Particularly, the waveform of the error voltage Verr can be expressed in the frequency domain as: [ Vref f = S q r ( f ) Vsen f + [ Vsen f k = - + &dgr; f - k f s ] S q r ( f - f s 2 ) - S q r f - f s

Expanding the waveform of the error voltage Verr in the Fourier series, we obtain: Verr f = 1 2 k = - + Vsen f - k f s e - j &pgr; k 2 sin &pgr; k 2 &pgr; k 2 + 1 2 k = - + Vsen f - k f s e - j &pgr; f 2 f s sin &pgr; f 2 f s &pgr; f 2 f s

(wherein k are the Fourier coefficients).

The formula can be simplified (assuming that the bandwidth of the loop is substantially lower than the frequency fs), only taking into account the first two harmonics of the error voltage Verr (K=0 and K=1): Verr f = 1 2 ( Vsen ( f ) + Vsen f - f s ) e - j &pgr; 2 sin &pgr; 2 &pgr; 2 + 1 2 ( Vsen ( f ) + Vsen f - f s ) e - j &pgr; f 2 f s sin &pgr; f 2 f s &pgr; f 2 f s

As described in detail in the following, in the proposed control circuit the error amplifier is put in a holding mode of operation (so as to hold the regulation voltage Vreg) during each holding phase of the sensor. In this way, the transfer function of the whole loop only includes the term due to the tracking phase: Vreg f = 1 2 ( Vsen ( f ) + Vsen f - f s ) e - j &pgr; 2 sin &pgr; 2 &pgr; 2 In any case, the transfer function is not substantially modified. The most interesting difference is that a gain of the transfer function is attenuated by a factor of 0.5, so that the bandwidth of the loop is reduced accordingly. As a consequence, the stability of the loop is strongly improved, since the transfer function gain reaches 0dB when its phase is far away from 180° (defining the instability condition in the Bode diagrams). It should be noted that the above-described compensation technique reduces the transfer function gain by 6dB; in any case, this reduction does not substantially impact the quality of the regulation on the charging current Ichr in most practical applications.

Preferably, the error amplifier is put in the holding mode also during a starting part of each tracking phase. Denoting with &agr; (from 0.5 to 1) the duty cycle of the clock signal CKe controlling the error amplifier in the holding mode and defining a phase Teh (diagram g), the transfer function of the loop (diagram h) will be: Vreg f = &agr; ( Vsen ( f ) + Vsen f - f s ) e - j &pgr; sin &agr; &pgr; &agr; &pgr;

In this way, the stability of the loop is further improved, since any transient effect caused by the switching between the holding phase and the next tracking phase of the sensor is strongly reduced. Of course, this result is achieved with an additional attenuation of the transfer function gain (in any case, sufficient to guarantee an acceptable level of regulation in most practical applications).

It is emphasized that the extent of the compensation introduced by the above-described solution only depends on the duty cycle of the clock signal CKe. Therefore, this effect can be tuned simply programming the control circuit to change the duty cycle of the clock signal CKe as required.

Experimental results have shown that the proposed technique strongly improves the performance of the battery-charger. For example, this technique has been applied to a stable loop with a bandwidth of 65KHz (lower than its Nyquist frequency, for example, 112.5KHz); the loop (compensated with a capacitor of 200pF) has a phase margin of 45° (which defines the extent of stability as the difference between 180° and the phase of the transfer function when its gain is 0dB).

The duty cycle of the clock signal CKe has then been set to 50% (so that the error amplifier is put in the holding mode during each holding phase of the sensor), and the capacitance of the compensation capacitor has been reduced by 50% at the same time. The bandwidth of the loop is kept at 65KHz, but the phase margin increases to 55° (with the gain that is attenuated by 6dB). As a further optimization, the duty cycle of the clock signal CKe has been set to 62.5% (so that the error amplifier is put in the holding mode during each holding phase and the first quarter of each tracking phase of the sensor), and the capacitance of the compensation capacitor has been reduced accordingly. The bandwidth of the loop and the phase margin remains at 65KHz and 55°, respectively (with the gain that is attenuated by 12dB).

Similar considerations apply if the sensing voltage has a different waveform, or if the control circuit is modeled with equivalent formulas.

A circuit scheme of the error amplifier 240 implementing the above-described compensation technique is shown in Figure 4.

The error amplifier 240 includes an input stage 403 with a differential structure, which directly receives the error voltage Verr at two input terminals 405a and 405b. In detail, the input terminal 405a is defined by the gate terminal of a PMOS 410a, whereas the input terminal 405b is defined by the gate terminal of a further PMOS 410b. The load of the transistors 410a,410b consists of a current mirror formed by two NMOSs 415a and 415b. For this purpose, the drain terminals of the transistors 415a and 415b are connected to the drain terminals of the transistors 410a and 410b, respectively. The gate terminal of the transistor 415a is shortcircuited to its drain terminal, and it is connected to the gate terminal of the transistor 415b. The source terminals of both transistors 415a and 415b are connected to the ground terminal. A further NMOS 420 is used to equalize the differential amplifier. The transistor 420 has the drain terminal connected to the drain terminal of the transistor 415a and the source terminal connected to the drain terminal of the transistor 415b. The gate terminal of the transistor 420 is directly controlled by the clock signal CKe.

The differential amplifier is biased by a direct current provided by a generator 425. The generator 425 is arranged between a power supply terminal (providing a voltage +Vcc, for example, 1.8V) and the drain terminal of an NMOS 430; the gate terminal of the transistor 430 is controlled by the enabling signal ENe.

The generator 425 is coupled (through the transistor 430) with a current mirror formed by two NMOSs 435a and 435b. In detail, the source terminal of the transistor 430 is connected to the drain terminal of the transistor 435a. The gate terminal of the transistor 435a is shortcircuited to its drain terminal, and it is connected to the gate terminal of the transistor 435b. The source terminals of both transistors 435a and 435b are connected to the ground terminal. An additional NMOS 440 has the drain terminal connected to the drain terminal of the transistor 435a and the source terminal connected to the ground terminal; the gate terminal of the transistor 440 is controlled by an inverted enabling signal ENe.

The enabling signal ENe is generated inverting the enabling signal ENe. For this purpose, the error amplifier 240 further includes an inverter formed by an NMOS 445a and a PMOS 445b. The transistor 445a has the source terminal connected to the ground terminal. The drain terminal of the transistor 445a is connected to the drain terminal of the transistor 445b. The source terminal of the transistor 445b is connected to the power supply terminal. The gate terminals of the transistors 445a,445b are connected together for receiving the enabling signal ENe; the drain terminals of the transistors 445a,445b output the (inverted) enabling signal ENe.

The current mirror 435a,435b is coupled with another current mirror formed by two PMOSs 450a and 450b. Particularly, the drain terminal of the transistor 435b is connected to the drain terminal of the transistor 450a. The gate terminal of the transistor 450a is shortcircuited to its drain terminal, and it is connected to the gate terminal of the transistor 450b. The source terminals of both transistors 450a and 450b are connected to the power supply terminal. The drain terminal of the transistor 450b is then connected to the drain terminals of the transistors 410a and 410b. An additional PMOS 455 has the drain terminal connected to the drain terminal of the transistor 450a and the source terminal connected to the power supply terminal; the gate terminal of the transistor 455 is controlled by the enabling signal ENe.

The above-described input stage 403 is cascade connected with an output stage 457, which provides the regulation voltage Vreg. The output stage 457 includes a power NMOS 460 having the source terminal connected to the ground terminal. A drain terminal of the transistor 460 is connected, through a load resistor 465, to an output terminal of the error amplifier 240 providing the regulation voltage Vreg. The output stage 457 is stabilized by means of a negative feedback network, which consists of the series of a resistor 470 and a capacitor 475 arranged between the drain terminal and the gate terminal of the transistor 460. An additional NMOS 480 has the source terminal connected to the ground terminal and the drain terminal connected to the gate terminal of the transistor 460; the gate terminal of the transistor 480 is controlled by the enabling signal ENe.

The input stage 403 and the output stage 457 are coupled through an NMOS 485. The transistor 485 has the drain terminal connected to the drain terminal of the transistor 410b and the source terminal connected to the gate terminal of the transistor 460. The gate terminal of the transistor 485 is controlled by the clock signal CKe through an inverter 490.

In a rest condition of the error amplifier 240, the enabling signals ENe and ENe are deasserted (i.e., ENe=0V and ENe=+Vcc). In this condition, the transistor 430 is off and the transistors 440,455,480 are on, so as to reduce any power consumption in the error amplifier 240. The error amplifier is enabled asserting the signals ENe and ENe (i.e., ENe=+Vcc and ENe=0V). As a consequence, the transistor 430 is turned on and the transistors 440,445,480 are turned off. The biasing current provided by the generator 425 is then mirrored (through the structures 435a,435b and 450a,450b) towards the differential amplifier 410a,410b.

During the normal operation of the error amplifier 240, the clock signal CKe is at low level (0V). Therefore, the transistor 420 is off and the transistor 485 is on. The stages 403 and 457 are then connected to each other, so that the error voltage Verr is amplified to generate the regulation voltage Vreg accordingly. In this phase, the capacitor 475 charges through the resistor 470.

As soon as the error amplifier is put in the holding mode (clock signal CKe at high level, i.e., +Vcc), the transistor 420 is turned on and the transistor 485 is turned off. As a consequence, the output stage 457 is insulted from the input stage 403. In this condition, the capacitor 475 is equivalent to an input capacitor with a very high capacitance (because of the Miller effect); therefore, the capacitor 475 holds an input voltage of the output stage 457 (and then also the regulation voltage Vreg) at the value before entering the holding mode.

Similar considerations apply if the error amplifier has a different architecture or includes equivalent components. However, the concepts of the present invention are also applicable when each stage has a different structure, or when the error amplifier is put in the holding mode in an equivalent manner.

More generally, the present invention proposes a circuit for controlling a battery-charger device with a closed-loop architecture. The circuit includes sensing means for sensing an operative quantity of the device. The sensing means is alternately controlled to track the operative quantity during a tracking phase and to hold the operative quantity during a holding phase. Driving means is used for providing a regulation signal (for regulating the operative quantity) according to a comparison between the sensed operative quantity and a reference value. The circuit of the invention further includes means for causing the driving means to hold the regulation signal during at least part of each holding phase.

The proposed solution is extremely flexible, since the extent of the compensation introduced by the holding of the regulation signal can be tuned in a very simple manner.

Therefore, the same circuit can be programmed for the use with a wide range of external components (regulating the desired quantity of the battery-charger device).

Moreover, this structure strongly reduces the area occupied by any compensation network included in the circuit.

The preferred embodiment of the invention described above offers further advantages.

Particularly, the error amplifier is put in the holding mode during at least each holding phase of the sensor.

This choice provides excellent performance of the proposed technique.

As an additional enhancement, the error amplifier is put in the holding mode during each holding phase and a starting part of each tracking phase of the sensor.

The proposed feature further improves the stability of the loop (thanks to the reduction of any transient effect caused by the switching between the holding phase and the next tracking phase).

However, the solution according to the present invention leads itself to be implemented putting the error amplifier in the holding mode during the holding phase and an ending part of the tracking phase, only during the holding phase, or even during a part thereof.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the error amplifier is put in the holding mode according to the duty cycle of the corresponding clock signal provided by the digital unit.

In this way, the tuning of the control circuit is strongly simplified.

Advantageously, the error amplifier includes an input stage and an output stage (with a compensation capacitor connected in feedback); the error amplifier is put in the holding mode disconnecting the two stages.

The proposed implementation exploits a component already available, and requires small changes to the error amplifier.

Alternatively, the error amplifier is put in the holding mode in a different way or using dedicated components, the error amplifier has another structure (even with a single stage), or the proposed technique is implemented elsewhere within the control circuit.

The control circuit of the invention is used in a battery-charger device.

However, it should be noted that the control circuit is suitable to be put on the market even as a stand-alone product.

Typically, the battery-charger device is included in a portable electronic system that is supplied by a battery.

In any case, the battery-charger device can be external to the system and put on the market separately (even for the use in different applications).


Anspruch[de]
Schaltung (225) zum Steuern einer Batterieladevorrichtung (200) mit einer geschlossenen Regelkreis-Architektur, aufweisend eine Erfassungseinrichtung (230) zum Erfassen einer Betriebsgröße des Geräts, eine Einrichtung (245) zum periodischen Steuern der Erfassungseinrichtung zum Nachführen der Betriebsgröße während einer Nachführphase und zum Halten der Betriebsgröße während einer Haltephase in einander abwechselnder Weise in jeder Periode, und eine Ansteuereinrichtung (240) zum Bereitstellen eines Regelsignals zum Regeln der Betriebsgröße in rückgekoppelter Weise, wobei das Regelsignal in Abhängigkeit von einem Vergleich zwischen der erfassten Betriebsgröße und einem Referenzwert geschaffen wird,

dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die Schaltung ferner eine Einrichtung (245) zum Erweitern der Haltephase in jeder Periode bis zu einem Startpunkt der Nachführphase der nachfolgenden Periode sowie eine Einrichtung (245; 485 - 490) zum Veranlassen der Ansteuereinrichtung zum Halten des Regelsignals während dieser erweiterten Haltephase in jeder Periode aufweist.
Schaltung (225) nach Anspruch 1,

wobei die Einrichtung zum Erweitern der Haltephase (245) eine digitale Einrichtung (245) zum Bereitstellen eines Taktsignals an die Ansteuereinrichtung (240) aufweist, wobei die Ansteuereinrichtung das Regelsignal in Abhängigkeit von einem Arbeitszyklus des Taktsignals hält.
Schaltung (225) nach Anspruch 2,

wobei die Erfassungseinrichtung (230) ein Fehlersignal liefert, das den Vergleich zwischen der erfassten Betriebsgröße und dem Referenzwert anzeigt, und wobei die Ansteuereinrichtung (240) einen Verstärker zum Erzeugen des Regelsignals unter Verstärkung des Fehlersignals aufweist, wobei der Verstärker eine Eingangsstufe (403) zum Empfang des Fehlersignals und eine Ausgangsstufe (457) zum Liefern des Regelsignals, eine kapazitive Einrichtung (470), die mit der Ausgangsstufe rückgekoppelt ist, sowie eine auf das Taktsignal ansprechende Einrichtung (485 - 490) zum Trennen der Ausgangsstufe von der Eingangsstufe aufweist.
Batterieladevorrichtung (200) mit einer geschlossenen Regelkreis-Architektur, das eine Steuerschaltung (225) nach einem der Ansprüche 1 bis 3 und eine Einrichtung (205 - 215) zum Regeln der Betriebsgröße in Abhängigkeit von dem Regelsignal aufweist. Tragbares elektronisches System (100) mit einer Funktionseinheit (125), einer Batterie (130) zum Speisen der Funktionseinheit und einer Batterieladevorrichtung (200) nach Anspruch 4 zum Laden der Batterie. Verfahren zum Steuern einer Batterieladevorrichtung mit geschlossener Regelkreis-Architektur, das folgende Schritte aufweist: Erfassen (Ts) einer Betriebsgröße der Vorrichtung durch periodisches Nachführen (Tst) der Betriebsgröße während einer Nachführphase und Halten (Tsh) der Betriebsgröße während einer Haltephase in einander abwechselnder Weise in jeder Periode, und Bereitstellen (Ts) eines Regelsignals zum Regeln der Betriebsgröße in rückgekoppelter Weise, wobei das Regelsignal in Abhängigkeit von einem Vergleich zwischen der erfassten Betriebsgröße und einem Referenzwert bereitgestellt wird, gekennzeichnet durch den Schritt, dass in jeder Periode die Haltephase bis zu einem Startpunkt der Nachführphase der nachfolgenden Periode erweitert wird und das Regelsignal während dieser erweiterten Haltephase gehalten (The) wird.
Anspruch[en]
A circuit (225) for controlling a battery-charger device (200) with a closed-loop architecture including sensing means (230) for sensing an operative quantity of the device, means (245) for periodically controlling the sensing means to track the operative quantity during a tracking phase and to hold the operative quantity during a holding phase alternately in each period, and driving means (240) for providing a regulation signal for regulating the operative quantity in feedback, the regulation signal being provided according to a comparison between the sensed operative quantity and a reference value,

characterized in that

the circuit further includes means (245) for extending the holding phase in each period to a starting part of the tracking phase of the following period, and means (245;485-490) for causing the driving means to hold the regulation signal during this extended holding phase in each period.
The circuit (225) according to claim 1, wherein, the means for extending the holding phase (245) include digital means (245) for providing a clock signal to the driving means (240), the driving means holding the regulation signal according to a duty-cycle of the clock signal. The circuit (225) according to claim 2, wherein the sensing means (230) provides an error signal indicative of the comparison between the sensed operative quantity and the reference value, and wherein the driving means (240) includes an amplifier for generating the regulation signal amplifying the error signal, the amplifier including an input stage (403) for receiving the error signal and an output stage (457) for providing the regulation signal, capacitive means (470) connected in feedback to the output stage, and means (485-490) responsive to the clock signal for disconnecting the output stage from the input stage. A battery-charger device (200) with a closed-loop architecture including the control circuit (225) according to any claim from 1 to 3 and means (205-215) for regulating the operative quantity in response to the regulation signal. A portable electronic system (100) including a functional unit (125), a battery (130) for supplying the functional unit, and the battery-charger device (200) according to claim 4 for charging the battery. A method of controlling a battery-charger device with a closed-loop architecture including the steps of: sensing (Ts) an operative quantity of the device by periodically tracking (Tst) the operative quantity during a tracking phase and holding (Tsh) the operative quantity during a holding phase alternately in each period, and providing (Ts) a regulation signal for regulating the operative quantity in feed-back, the regulation signal being provided according to a comparison between the sensed operative quantity and a reference value, characterized by the step of

in each period, extending the holding phase to a starting part of the tracking phase of the following period, and holding (The) the regulation signal during this extended holding phase.
Anspruch[fr]
Circuit (225) pour commander un dispositif chargeur de batterie (200) à architecture en boucle fermée incluant un moyen de détection (230) pour détecter une quantité opérative du dispositif, des moyens (245) pour commander périodiquement les moyens de détection pour suivre la quantité opérative pendant une phase de suivi et pour maintenir la quantité opérative pendant une phase de maintien de façon alternée à chaque période, et des moyens de commande (240) pour fournir un signal de régulation pour réguler la quantité opérative en réaction, le signal de régulation étant fourni en fonction d'une comparaison entre la quantité opérative détectée et une valeur de référence ;

caractérisé en ce que le circuit comprend en outre des moyens (245) pour allonger la phase de maintien à chaque période jusqu'à une partie de début de la phase de suivi de la période suivante, et des moyens (245, 485-490) pour amener les moyens de commande à maintenir le signal de régulation pendant cette phase de maintien allongée lors de chaque période.
Circuit (225) selon la revendication 1, dans lequel les moyens pour étendre la phase de maintien (245) incluent des moyens numériques (245) pour fournir un signal d'horloge aux moyens de commande (240), les moyens de commande maintenant le signal de régulation en fonction du rapport cyclique du signal d'horloge. Circuit (225) selon la revendication 2, dans lequel les moyens de détection (230) fournissent un signal d'erreur indicatif de la comparaison entre la quantité opérative détectée et la valeur de référence, et dans lequel les moyens de commande (240) incluent un amplificateur pour produire le signal de régulation amplifiant le signal d'erreur, l'amplificateur incluant un étage d'entrée (403) pour recevoir le signal d'erreur et un étage de sortie (457) pour fournir le signal de régulation, des moyens capacitifs (470) connectés en réaction sur l'étage de sortie, et des moyens (485-490) agissant en réponse au signal d'horloge pour déconnecter l'étage de sortie de l'étage d'entrée. Dispositif chargeur de batterie (200) à architecture en boucle fermée incluant le circuit de commande (225) selon l'une quelconque des revendications 1 à 3 et des moyens (205-215) pour réguler la quantité opérative en réponse au signal de régulation. Système électronique portable (100) incluant un module fonctionnel (125), une batterie (130) pour alimenter le module fonctionnel, et le dispositif chargeur de batterie (200) selon la revendication 4 pour charger la batterie. Procédé de contrôle d'un dispositif chargeur de batterie à architecture en boucle fermée incluant les étapes suivantes : détecter (Ts) une quantité opérative du dispositif en suivant périodiquement (Tst) la quantité opérative pendant une phase de suivi et en maintenant (Tsh) la quantité opérative pendant une phase de maintien de façon alternée lors de chaque période ; et fournir (Ts) un signal de régulation pour réguler la quantité opérative en réaction, le signal de régulation étant fourni en fonction d'une comparaison entre la quantité opérative détectée et une valeur de référence ; caractérisé par l'étape consistant, lors de chaque période, à allonger la phase de maintien jusqu'à une partie de début de la phase de suivi de la période suivante, et à maintenir (The) le signal de régulation pendant cette phase de maintien allongée.






IPC
A Täglicher Lebensbedarf
B Arbeitsverfahren; Transportieren
C Chemie; Hüttenwesen
D Textilien; Papier
E Bauwesen; Erdbohren; Bergbau
F Maschinenbau; Beleuchtung; Heizung; Waffen; Sprengen
G Physik
H Elektrotechnik

Anmelder
Datum

Patentrecherche

Patent Zeichnungen (PDF)

Copyright © 2008 Patent-De Alle Rechte vorbehalten. eMail: info@patent-de.com