PatentDe  


Dokumentenidentifikation EP1113985 08.11.2007
EP-Veröffentlichungsnummer 0001113985
Titel HERSTELLUNG VON DISTICKSTOFFMONOXID
Anmelder ExxonMobil Oil Corp., Fairfax, Va., US
Erfinder CHANG, Clarence Dayton, Princeton, NJ 08540, US;
STEVENSON, Scott Andrew, Houston, TX 77094, US;
VARTULI, James Clarke, West Chester, PA 19380, US
Vertreter derzeit kein Vertreter bestellt
DE-Aktenzeichen 69937194
Vertragsstaaten AT, BE, CH, CY, DE, DK, ES, FI, FR, GB, GR, IE, IT, LI, LU, MC, NL, PT, SE
Sprache des Dokument EN
EP-Anmeldetag 03.08.1999
EP-Aktenzeichen 999377625
WO-Anmeldetag 03.08.1999
PCT-Aktenzeichen PCT/US99/17560
WO-Veröffentlichungsnummer 2000010915
WO-Veröffentlichungsdatum 02.03.2000
EP-Offenlegungsdatum 11.07.2001
EP date of grant 26.09.2007
Veröffentlichungstag im Patentblatt 08.11.2007
IPC-Hauptklasse C01B 21/26(2006.01)A, F, I, 20051017, B, H, EP
IPC-Nebenklasse B01J 23/28(2006.01)A, L, I, 20051017, B, H, EP   C07C 37/60(2006.01)A, L, I, 20051017, B, H, EP   

Beschreibung[en]

This invention is directed to the production of nitrous oxide, N2O, from ammonia and nitric oxide, NO, over a catalyst comprising molybdenum oxide that is supported on a Group IVB metal oxide support such as zirconia and that comprises a Group VIIIB metal oxide component such as iron oxide.

One commercial process for making nitrous oxide involves the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate when heated from 200 to 260°C according to the following equation:



        NH4NO3 - N2O + 2H2O



However, extreme caution must be used in handling ammonium nitrate, which may be highly explosive under extreme shock or elevated temperatures. Therefore, improved methods for controlling the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate have been disclosed. For example, the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate in the presence of a melt containing ammonium hydrogen sulfate and ammonium sulfate is described in US-A- 4,154,806 ; the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate into an aqueous, strongly acid reaction liquor containing chloride ions as a catalyst is described in US-A- 4,102,986 ; and the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate in a chloride-containing aqueous solution of nitric acid and the presence of catalytically active ions of manganese, copper, cerium, lead, bismuth, cobalt or nickel, is described in US-A- 3,656,899 .

Another commercial process for producing nitrous oxide involves the reaction of ammonia and air using Mn and Bi oxides as catalysts. For example, Japanese Patent No. 6122507 describes a process for preparing nitrous oxide by the oxidation of ammonia with oxygen in the presence of steam and a CuO/MnO2 catalyst. Other methods for producing nitrous oxide include the reaction of a molten nitrate salt with ammonium chloride and the reaction of ammonia with at least one molten nitrate salt of an alkaline earth metal, as described in US-A- 4,720,377 .

The article "Selective oxidation of ammonia to nitrogen over SiO2 supported MO3 catalysts" by M. de Boer et al in Catalysis Today, 17 (1993) page 189, describes the testing of V2O5, MoO3 and WO3 catalysts on various supports in the selective catalytic reduction of NO. It is observed that minor amounts of N2O are formed. The article proposes a reaction mechanism to explain the formation of N2O.

US-A-5 401 478 provides a catalytic method for converting nitrogen oxides to nitrogen (i.e., N2) in the presence of a catalyst comprising an acidic solid component comprising a Group IVB metal oxide modified with an oxyanion of a Group VIB metal, such as zirconia modified with tungstate.

The present invention is directed to the conversion of ammonia with nitric oxide and/or oxygen into nitrous oxide using a catalyst comprising molybdenum oxide, Group VIII B metal oxide and Group IV B metal oxide. Accordingly, the present invention avoids the dangers associated with the use and handling of ammonium nitrate and is an alternative and novel nitrous oxide synthesis method that is inexpensive and safe.

The present invention is directed to a process for producing nitrous oxide comprising the step of reacting ammonia with nitric oxide and/or oxygen in the presence of a catalyst as specified in claim 1, to produce an effluent mixture comprising nitrous oxide.

The Catalyst

The process of the present invention utilizes a catalyst that comprises the molybdenum oxide and Group VIIIB metal oxide, in combination with the Group IVB metal oxide as a support.

Sources of the molybdenum oxide may include pure molybdenum oxide MoO3, ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate (NH4)6Mo7O24 - 4H2O, and molybdenum halides and oxyhalides.

The Group IVB metal oxide used in the process of the present invention may be an oxide of titanium, zirconium or hafnium. Preferably, the Group IVB metal oxide is zirconia. Sources of the Group IVB metal oxide may include zirconyl chloride and zirconyl nitrate. The weight ratio of the molybdenum oxide to Group IVB metal oxide is from 0.1:1 to 0.3:1.

The Group VIIIB metal oxide may be an oxide of iron. Preferably, the Group VIIIB metal oxide is iron oxide. Sources of the Group VIIIB metal oxide may include iron (II) sulfate heptahydrate FeSO4 · 7H2O, iron halides and iron nitrate. The molar ratio of the Group VIIIB metal oxide to the Group VIB metal oxide is preferably from 0.005:1 to 0.05:1.

Preparation of the Catalyst

The catalyst used in the process of the present invention is prepared by combining a first liquid solution comprising a source of the molybdenum oxide, and a second liquid solution comprising a source of the Group IVB metal oxide and a third liquid solution comprising a source of the Group VIIIB metal oxide, under conditions sufficient to cause precipitation of the catalyst. Examples of the precipitating reagent include ammonium hydroxide, alkylammonium hydroxide and alkaline hydroxides such as sodium hydroxide. Water is a preferred solvent for these solutions.

The temperature at which the liquid solution is maintained during precipitation may be less than 200°C, e.g., from 0 to 200°C. A particular range of such temperatures is from 50 to 100°C. The pH range of the liquid solution during precipitation is from 4 to 11.

The catalyst may be recovered from the liquid solution by filtration, followed by drying. The catalyst may be subjected to a final calcination as described below to dehydrate the catalyst and to confer the required mechanical strength on the catalyst.

Calcination of the catalyst may be carried out, preferably in an oxidizing atmosphere, at atmospheric pressure to 6890 kPa (1000 psi); and at temperatures from 500 to 850°C. The calcination time may be up to 48 hours, e.g., for 0.5 to 24 hours, e.g., for 1.0 to 10 hours.

The Process

Nitric oxide and ammonia are converted to nitrous oxide in the present invention by a reaction which may be described by the following equation:



        4NH3 + 4NO + 3O2 - 4N2O + 6H2O,



although other reactions may also occur.

An additional reaction that occurs when oxygen is present is the oxidation of ammonia with oxygen to form nitrous oxide which may be described by the following equation:



        2NH3 + 2O2 - N2O + 3H2O



The molar feed ratio of nitric oxide to ammonia ranges from 0.01:1 to 10:1; the amount of oxygen fed to the reaction unit ranges from 0.01 to 35 molar %.

The method according to the present invention is carried out at a temperature ranging from 200 to 600°C, and preferably from 300 to 500°C; a pressure ranging from 10.1 kPa to 10.1 MPa (0.1 to 100 atmospheres), and preferably from 50.6 to 506 kPa (0.5 to 5 atmospheres). The gas hourly space velocity for the reaction ranges from 1,000 to 10,000,000 hr-1, and preferably from 20,000 to 1,000,000 hr-1.

The effluent mixture comprises nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, ammonia and the desired product, nitrous oxide. The nitrous oxide may be separated and recovered from the effluent mixture by conventional means known to skilled artisans or the entire effluent may be used as a feed to a separate reactor. Alternatively, the nitrous oxide can be utilized in situ as a selective oxidant for various substrates. For example, benzene could be co-fed with the reactants and phenol product recovered.

The invention will now be more particularly described with reference to the Examples, each of which discloses the conversion of a gaseous mixture containing ammonia together with nitric oxide and/or oxygen, with the balance in each case being helium. Examples IV and XII are according to the invention as claimed.

Example I

Five hundred grams of ZrOCl2.8H2O were dissolved with stirring in 6.0 liters of distilled water. To this, a solution containing 33 grams of (NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O in 500 ml of H2O was added. Finally, a solution containing 263 ml of conc. NH4OH and 500 ml of distilled H2O was added dropwise over a 30-45 minute period. The pH of the solution was approximately 9. This slurry was then placed in a steambox for 72 hours. The product formed was recovered by filtration, washed with excess water; and dried overnight at 85°C. The material was then calcined in air at 700°C for 3 hours. Chemical analysis of the dried materials showed a Mo/Zr ratio of 0.11 (weight basis); this corresponds to a water-free sample composition of approximately 7.3% Mo.

Table 1 shows the activity and selectivity of this sample for the conversion of 500 ppm each of ammonia and nitric oxide into N2O at a space velocity of approximately 600,000 hr-1. At 500°C, 60% of the inlet ammonia and nitric oxide is converted. The selectivity to N2O is approximately 61 %; the remaining 39% of the material is converted to N2. Table 1. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example L 0.050 g catalyst used. Space velocity ∼ 600,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 300 1 500 500 448 447 45 5 9.9% 350 1 500 500 399 397 84 14 14.4% 400 1 500 500 345 345 105 44 29.6% 450 1 500 500 273 288 109 107 49.7% 500 1 500 500 173 230 115 180 61.1%

Example II

This catalyst was prepared in a manner identical to Example I except that it was calcined in air at 830°C for 3 hours. Table 2 shows that calcination of this material at a higher temperature gives higher selectivity to N2O at temperatures of 400°C and below than the catalyst of Example I, but a lower selectivity at 500°C. The selectivity of this sample is much less affected by temperature than that of the catalyst used in Example I. Table 2. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example II. 0.050 g catalyst used. Space velocity ∼ 600,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 300 1 500 500 465 473 14 16 52.7% 350 1 500 500 397 432 37 47 55.7% 400 1 500 500 291 397 70 85 54.8% 450 1 500 500 193 378 101 110 52.2% 500 1 500 500 132 378 124 117 48.5%

Example III

Five hundred grams of ZrOCl2·8H2O were dissolved with stirring in 6.0 liters of distilled water. To this, a solution containing 66 grams of (NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O in 500 ml of H2O was added. Finally, a solution containing 263 ml of conc. NH4OH and 500 ml of distilled H2O was added dropwise over a 30-45 minute period. The pH of the solution was adjusted to approximately 9 by the addition of 146 grams of concentrated NH4OH. This slurry was then placed in a steambox for 72 hours. The product formed was recovered by filtration, washed with excess water, and dried overnight at 85°C. The material was then calcined in air at 600°C for 3 hours. Chemical analysis of the dried materials showed an Mo/Zr ratio of 0.19 (weight basis); this corresponds to a water-free sample composition of approximately 11.4% Mo. Table 3 shows the activity and selectivity of this sample for N2O formation. The higher concentrations of molybdenum gives both higher activities and selectivities than observed in Example I. Table 3. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example III. 0.050 g catalyst used. Space velocity ∼ 600,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 300 1 500 500 385 385 91 15 14.5% 350 1 500 500 322 321 121 50 29.0% 400 1 500 500 252 269 109 125 53.5% 450 1 500 500 167 228 95 205 68.4% 500 1 500 500 92 211 99 250 71.7%

Example IV

Five hundred grams of ZrOCl2·8H2O were dissolved with stirring in 6.0 liters of distilled water. To this, a solution containing 66 grams of (NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O in 500 ml of H2O was added. Another solution containing 7.5 grams of FeSO4·7H2O in 500 ml of H2O was added. Finally, a solution containing 263 ml of conc. NH4OH and 500 ml of distilled H2O was added dropwise over a 30-45 minute period. The pH of the solution was adjusted to approximately 9. This slurry was then placed in a steambox for 72 hours. The product formed was recovered by filtration, washed with excess water, and dried overnight at 85°C. The material was then calcined in air at 600°C for 3 hours. Chemical analysis of the dried materials showed an Mo/Zr ratio of 0.20 (weight basis) and an Fe/Zr ratio of 0.012; this corresponds to a water-free sample composition of approximately 12.1% Mo and 0.72% Fe. Table 4 shows the activity and selectivity of this iron-containing sample. Table 4. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example IV. 0.052 g catalyst used. Space velocity - 600,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 300 1 500 500 387 382 90 19 17.2% 350 1 500 500 310 314 117 62 34.4% 400 1 500 500 220 259 110 145 56.9% 450 1 500 500 132 226 101 216 68.1% 500 1 500 500 70 222 106 246 69.8%

Example V

250 grams of ZrOCl2·8H2O were dissolved with stirring in 1.5 liters of distilled water. This solution was heated to approximately 60°C. To this, a solution containing 33 grams of (NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O and 130 grams of conc. NH4OH in 1250 ml of H2O was added. This solution was also heated to approximately 60°C. The solution containing the zirconyl chloride was slowly added to the second solution with mixing. The pH of the solution was approximately 7. This slurry was then placed in a steambox for 72 hours. The product formed was recovered by filtration, washed with excess water, and dried overnight at 85°C. The material was then calcined in air at 600°C for 3 hours. Chemical analysis of the dried materials showed a Mo/Zr ratio of 0.24 (weight basis); this corresponds to a water-free sample composition of approximately 14.1% Mo. Table 5 shows that catalyst synthesis at a higher temperature results in a sample with slightly higher selectivity to N2O, especially at temperatures of 400°C and below, as compared to Example III. Table 5. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example V. 0.064 g catalyst used. Space velocity - 450,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T (°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 300 1 500 500 371 362 90 30 25.3% 350 1 500 500 272 279 117 93 44.2% 400 1 500 500 162 223 112 185 62.2% 450 1 500 500 78 202 106 246 69.9% 500 1 500 500 32 208 108 265 71.1%

Example VI

This catalyst was prepared in a manner identical to Example V except that it was calcined in air at 700°C for 3 hours. Table 6 shows that calcining at 700°C lowers overall activity somewhat compared to Example V; selectivities to N2O are higher at 400°C and below but are lower at 450 and 500°C. Table 6. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example VI. 0.054 g catalyst used. Space velocity - 600,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T (°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 300 1 500 500 402 403 62 30 32.8% 350 1 500 500 306 330 89 85 49.0% 400 1 500 500 197 280 98 157 61.7% 450 1 500 500 111 260 106 204 65.9% 500 1 500 500 57 261 115 220 65.8%

Example VII

This catalyst was prepared in a manner identical to Example V except that it was calcined in air at 830°C for 3 hours. Table 7 shows that calcining at 830°C lowers both activity and selectivity to N2O. Table 7. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example VII. 0.052 g catalyst used. Space velocity - 600,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 300 1 500 500 449 453 29 21 41.7% 350 1 500 500 376 401 54 57 51.1% 400 1 500 500 276 361 77 102 57.0% 450 1 500 500 183 336 97 140 59.2% 500 1 500 500 115 327 112 161 59.0%

Example VIII

A solution containing 41.4 grams of (NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O and 200 grams of H2O was prepared. The solution was slowly added to 150 grams of silica (HiSil 233) and placed in a polypropylene bottle. This mixture was mixed using a roller overnight. The product formed was recovered by filtration, washed with minimum water, and dried overnight at 85°C. The material was then calcined in air at 540°C for 3 hours. From the preparation we expect this sample to contain approximately 15% Mo by weight. Table 8 shows that this Mo/SiO2 catalyst can also convert nitric oxide and ammonia into N2O, although in this case with a lower selectivity than most of the examples described above. Table 8. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example VIII. 0.147 g catalyst used. Space velocity - 200,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 300 1 500 500 471 472 21 10 31.1% 350 1 500 500 442 442 40 18 31.3% 400 1 500 500 392 401 66 32 32.8% 450 1 500 500 323 351 100 54 35.2% 500 1 500 500 205 280 150 92 38.1%

Example IX

Table 9 shows that bulk MoO3, obtained from the Aldrich Chemical Company, is also an effective catalyst for converting nitric oxide and ammonia into N2O. Compared to the supported catalysts, selectivities at 350°C and below are higher, but fall steadily as temperature increases. Table 9. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example IX. 0.266 g catalyst used. Space velocity ∼ 120,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 300 1 500 500 462 466 10 33 76.0% 350 1 500 500 386 415 29 73 71.4% 400 1 500 500 243 353 72 128 63.9% 450 1 500 500 32 340 151 148 49.5% 500 1 500 500 0 449 194 61 23.8%

Example X

The data shown in Table 10 were collected using the catalyst described in Example III. They show that selectivity to N2O is not a strong function of inlet nitric oxide and ammonia concentration when nitric oxide and ammonia are fed in equimolar amounts. There is no reason to believe that feeding much higher concentrations of nitric oxide and ammonia would not also result in the formation of correspondingly high concentrations of N2O. Table 10. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example III. Effect of variations in inlet NO and NH<sub>3</sub> concentrations. 0.050 g catalyst used. Space velocity ∼ 600,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 500 1 500 500 242 311 63 157 71.4% 500 1 200 200 84 132 25 68 73.4% 500 1 350 350 163 220 45 114 71.7% 500 1 750 750 387 463 95 230 70.9% 500 1 907 907 481 560 115 277 71.6%

Example XI

The data shown in Table 11 were collected using the catalyst described in Example V. They show that significant amounts of N2O are formed even if nitric oxide and ammonia are not fed in equimolar amounts. Table 11 Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example V. Effect of variations in inlet NO and NH<sub>3</sub> concentrations. 0.064 g catalyst used. Space velocity ∼ 450,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 500 1 500 500 32 208 108 265 71.1% 500 1 625 375 54 108 148 260 63.7%

Example XII

The data shown in Table 12 were collected using the catalyst described in Example IV. They show that some N2O is formed even when no nitric oxide is fed, i.e., when only ammonia and oxygen are fed. Selectivities are lower, however, than when equimolar amounts of nitric oxide and ammonia are fed. Table 12. Conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> to N<sub>2</sub>O over catalyst described in Example IV. Effect of feeding only NH<sub>3</sub>. 0.050 g catalyst used. Space velocity ∼ 600,000 hr<sup>-1</sup>. inlet concentrations outlet concentrations selectivity to T(°C) O2(%) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) N2O 445 1 500 0 211 0 119 17 12.5% 445 2 500 0 212 0 124 20 13.9% 445 3 500 0 214 0 127 22 14.5% 550 1 500 0 48 18 149 61 29.0% 550 3 500 0 51 19 143 78 35.3% 550 0.6 500 0 54 14 148 58 28.5% 550 0.6 1000 0 145 12 318 90 22.2% 550 0.8 1840 0 337 9 606 125 17.1%

Example XIII

The data shown in Table 13 were collected using the catalyst described in Example III calcined at 600°C. They show that the conversion and N2O selectivity are increased as increasing amounts of oxygen in the 1-4.5% range are fed Table 13. Effect of oxygen concentration on conversion of NO and NH<sub>3</sub> over Mo/ZrO<sub>2</sub> calcined at 600°C. * defined as (N<sub>2</sub> + N<sub>2</sub>O) / (inlet NH<sub>3</sub> + inlet NO) †defined as (N<sub>2</sub>O)/(N<sub>2</sub> + N<sub>2</sub>O)GHSV: 1,375,000 hr<sup>-1</sup> Feed: NH<sub>3</sub> (500 ppm); NO (500 ppm); O<sub>2</sub> (1-4.5%) Outlet concentrations percent selectivity to T (°C) inlet O2(ppm) NH3(ppm) NO(ppm) N2(ppm) N2O(ppm) conversion* N2O† 450 1 319 347 52 111 32.5 68.3 450 4.5 319 342 53 116 33.8 68.6 475 1 278 326 58 137 38.9 70.4 475 4.5 276 320 57 145 40.4 71.8 500 1 247 310 62 159 44.2 72.0 500 2 240 306 61 167 45.6 73.5


Anspruch[de]
Verfahren zur Herstellung von Distickstoffoxid, bei dem Ammoniak mit Stickstoffmonoxid und/oder Sauerstoff in Gegenwart von Katalysator umgesetzt wird, der Molybdänoxid und Gruppe VIIIB-Metalloxid in Kombination mit Gruppe IVB-Metalloxid als Träger enthält, um eine ausströmende Mischung zu erzeugen, die Distickstoffoxid enthält, wobei der Katalysator hergestellt wird, indem eine erste flüssige Lösung, die eine Quelle für das Molybdänoxid enthält, mit einer zweiten flüssigen Lösung, die eine Quelle für das Gruppe IVB-Metalloxid enthält, und einer dritten flüssigen Lösung, die eine Quelle für das Gruppe VIIIB-Metalloxid enthält, unter Bedingungen miteinander kombiniert wird, die ausreichen, um die Fällung des Katalysators zu bewirken, und das Gewichtsverhältnis von Molybdänoxid zu Gruppe IVB-Metalloxid im Katalysator 0,1 : 1 bis 0,3 : 1 beträgt. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, bei dem das Gruppe IVB-Metalloxid Zirkoniumoxid ist. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, bei dem das molare Verhältnis von Gruppe VIIIB-Metalloxid zu Molybdänoxid im Katalysator 0,001 : 1 bis 0,1 : 1 beträgt. Verfahren nach Anspruch 1, 2 oder 3, bei dem das Gruppe VIIIB-Metalloxid Eisenoxid ist. Verfahren nach einem der vorhergehenden Ansprüche, bei dem die Reaktion von Ammoniak mit Stickstoffmonoxid und/oder Sauerstoff bei einer Temperatur von 300 bis 500 °C, einem Druck von 50,6 bis 506 kPa (0,5 bis 5 atm) und einer stündlichen Gasraumgeschwindigkeit von 20 000 bis 1 000 000 h-1 durchgeführt wird.
Anspruch[en]
A process for producing nitrous oxide comprising the step of reacting ammonia with nitric oxide and/or oxygen in the presence of catalyst comprising a molybdenum oxide and a Group VIIIB metal oxide in combination with a Group IVB metal oxide as a support, to produce an effluent mixture comprising nitrous oxide, the catalyst being prepared by combining a first liquid solution comprising a source of the molybdenum oxide and a second liquid solution comprising a source of the Group IVB metal oxide and a third liquid solution comprising a source of the Group VIIIB metal oxide under conditions sufficient to cause precipitation of the catalyst, and the weight ratio of molybdenum oxide to Group IVB metal oxide in the catalyst being from 0.1:1 to 0.3:1. The process of claim 1 wherein the Group IVB metal oxide is zirconia. The process of claim 1 wherein the molar ratio of Group VIIIB metal oxide to molybdenum oxide in the catalyst is from 0.001:1 to 0.1:1. The process of claim 1, 2 or 3 wherein the Group VIIIB metal oxide is iron oxide. The process of any preceding claim wherein the reaction of ammonia with nitric oxide and/or oxygen is carried out at a temperature of from 300 to 500°C, a pressure of from 50.6 to 506kPa (0.5 to 5 atmospheres) and a gas hourly space velocity of from 20000 to 1000 000 hr-1.
Anspruch[fr]
Procédé de production d'oxyde nitreux comprenant l'étape consistant à faire réagir de l'ammoniac avec de l'oxyde nitrique et/ou de l'oxygène en présence d'un catalyseur comprenant un oxyde de molybdène et un oxyde d'un métal du Groupe VIIIB en combinaison avec un oxyde d'un métal du Groupe IVB comme support, pour produire un mélange effluent comprenant de l'oxyde nitreux, le catalyseur étant préparé en combinant une première solution liquide comprenant une source de l'oxyde de molybdène et une deuxième solution liquide comprenant une source de l'oxyde de métal du Groupe IVB et une troisième solution liquide comprenant une source de l'oxyde de métal du Groupe VIIIB, dans des conditions suffisantes pour provoquer la précipitation du catalyseur, et le rapport pondéral entre l'oxyde de molybdène et l'oxyde de métal du Groupe IVB dans le catalyseur étant de 0,1:1 à 0,3:1. Procédé selon la revendication 1 dans lequel l'oxyde de métal du Groupe IVB est la zircone. Procédé selon la revendication 1 dans lequel le rapport molaire entre l'oxyde de métal du Groupe VIIIB et l'oxyde de molybdène dans le catalyseur est de 0,001:1 à 0,1:1. Procédé selon la revendication 1, 2 ou 3 dans lequel l'oxyde de métal du Groupe VIIIB est l'oxyde de fer. Procédé selon l'une quelconque des revendications précédentes dans lequel la réaction de l'ammoniac avec l'oxyde nitrique et/ou l'oxygène est réalisée à une température de 300 à 500°C, à une pression de 50,6 à 506 kPa (0,5 à 5 atmosphères) et une vitesse spatiale horaire de gaz de 20 000 à 1 000 000 h-1.






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